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Your ultimate V-Ray material resource

Your ultimate V-Ray material resource
We have recently discovered that some of the latest material-uploads did not include a material file but an infected pif file instead. We have already removed those uploads, scanned & cleaned our whole database and banned the corresponding accounts. Please make sure though that you do NOT open any files that have an .exe, .pif or .scr extension.Please be aware that we have to control every material concerning legal issues. If you notice any copyright-protected textures on this site, please report this immediately to support[at]vray-materials.de. And if you like our site, feel free to donate :D At present there are 634235 registered users and 2446 materials on this site.

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Related:  D.C.C Tools and TechniquesМатериалы

FREE Vray Tutorial - Vray rollouts explained: a basic overview Caustics are light patterns formed by refracted/reflected light. Take a look at the rendered image, these are caustics. There are two types of caustics: GI caustics and direct light caustics. Creating a realistic wood material with V-Ray - Max Underground Introduction We are going to look at some real world photos of antique wood, analyze the main features and use some advanced material creation techniques to re-create that look with V-Ray. Instead of unwrapping all the objects and painting custom maps for them, we are going to use a procedural approach. This method is quicker and the resulting material can be re-used in other projects. The result is also very flexible – since I’ll be using a layered approach, I can turn off or modify features like worn edges or dust. This tutorial is not meant to just show you how to create wood, it’s also meant to show you how you can achieve complex results using some simple V-Ray and 3DS Max maps.

Chaos Group / Chaos Software official website - home - V-Ray® - award winning, production-ready 3D rendering solutions Dear ASGVIS user, Due to the acquisition of ASGVIS by Chaos Group and the merging process you will no longer be able to log in to the ASGVIS.COM website to download builds, materials and watch tutorials, etc. All users’ information has now moved to www.chaosgroup.com. All users’ log-in details have been changed. If you are a new user, please proceed directly to the Chaos Group website and register to download the V-Ray for Rhino / V-Ray for SketchUp FREE TRIAL VERSIONS. If you experience any problems, please contact us at support@chaosgroup.com. sIBL Archive Installation Each thumbnail links directly to an archived sIBL-set. Watch out, these are big downloads. Click to download, then expand the zip achive as a folder and place the folder in your sIBL-Collection.

Skymedias - Blog Content Glass Rendering Tutorial with Vray in 3dsmax Author: Jan Rybar Software: 3dsmax, VRay Author Website: ImagesFX Our work is primarily artistically oriented – we are given plans and sketches, and we are entrusted with the task of making great imagery and movies. Occasionally however, based on the evolution of our software (renderers), clients are requesting for more realism-based images. Material examples The Rougness parameter The Reflection color parameter The Reflection glossiness parameter The Energy preservation mode The Fresnel option The Anisotropy parameter The Anisotropy rotation parameter The Refraction color parameter The Refraction glossiness parameter The Refraction IOR parameter The Refraction depth parameter The refraction Exit color parameter The Fog color parameter The Fog multiplier parameter The BRDF type The Roughness parameter This example demonstrates the effect of the Roughness parameter. Note how as the Roughness increases, the materials appears more "flat" and dusty. The Reflection color parameter This example demonstrates how the Reflection color parameter controls the reflectivity of the material.

Chaos Group / Chaos Software official website - home - V-Ray® - award winning, production-ready 3D rendering solutions Dear ASGVIS user, Due to the acquisition of ASGVIS by Chaos Group and the merging process you will no longer be able to log in to the ASGVIS.COM website to download builds, materials and watch tutorials, etc. All users’ information has now moved to www.chaosgroup.com. All users’ log-in details have been changed. If you are a new user, please proceed directly to the Chaos Group website and register to download the V-Ray for Rhino / V-Ray for SketchUp FREE TRIAL VERSIONS. Hdri Panorama HDRI / 360° Fürstenfeld, Austria HDRI shootetd near Mittersil in Salzburg Austria 78th HDRI Panorama release. Archviz background images HDRI Background Images (no Panoramas) for architectural visualisation. The 28 Pictures have 10Mp Resolution. also downloadable as tif or jpg Images.

VRay Training Manual for RHINO Texture MappingUI types and adjustment Material: Bump Map Add Bump map Material: Transparency Mapping What's Transparency Mapping?The logic of Transparency mapAnother way of using Transparency mapOther uses of transparency Making sense of VRay Settings Recently Ryan Lintott and I went to a VRay training seminar by the man himself Vladimir Koylazo (one of the makers of VRay) who went through a number of facets of VRay including a step by step way of breaking down your render settings into logical steps to get the best combination of quality and speed. I thought this was just too gooder process not to share so have decided to put together the following tutorial taking people through these steps he explained so VRay will hopefully become less complicated, and so you can better critique what is happening within your scenes. The real core of this is every scene is different and has different requirements in terms of detail resolution and Global Illumination. There are many settings posted on the web (I have done a few myself) outlining suitable settings for VRay, and much debate over which setting is best. So here are the steps:

Exponential and linear colour mapping in Vray Within Vray there are various processes and tools that we use to generate what we would consider to be a realistic rendered image. Options such as tone mapping, light intensity and camera exposure are fully configurable and can be moulded into what a 3D visualiser would name as their workflow. There are no right or wrong processes as they all lead to the same goal, to produce a high quality render. If you choose not to use a linear workflow, it may not be physically correct in terms of light intensity but it might look correct and is therefore acceptable.

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