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100 Sci-Fi/Fantasy Novels to Geek Out Over - Half Price Books Blog - HPB.com

100 Sci-Fi/Fantasy Novels to Geek Out Over - Half Price Books Blog - HPB.com
If your answer to every question is 42. If you can quote the three laws of Robotics. If you want to say “my precious” every time you see a gold band. Then this list is for you. We asked our 3,000 bibliomaniacs what their favorite SciFi/Fantasy novels were, and here are their top 100 answers. Now, Dune has been on my reading list for a while, but I am definitely going to have to read Ender's Game. You can find these books and more at your local Half Price Books. -- Julie

http://blog.hpb.com/hpb-blog/2012/8/21/100-sci-fifantasy-novels-to-geek-out-over.html

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