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Your Clever Password Tricks Aren't Protecting You from Today's Hackers

Your Clever Password Tricks Aren't Protecting You from Today's Hackers
Related:  Security - Privacy - Back Ups - Hacking - DownloadingCyber Securityfuncshun

Which VPN Providers Really Take Anonymity Seriously? As detailed in yesterday’s article, if a VPN provider carries logs of their users’ activities the chances of them being able to live up to their claim of offering an anonymous service begins to decrease rapidly. There are dozens of VPN providers, many of which carry marketing on their web pages which suggests that the anonymity of their subscribers is a top priority. But is it really? Do their privacy policies stand up to scrutiny? Over the past two weeks TorrentFreak contacted some of the leading, most-advertised, and most talked about VPN providers in the file-sharing and anonymity space. 1. 2. This article does not attempt to consider the actual quality of service offered by any listed provider, nor does it consider whether any service is good value for money. P2P Supporting VPN providers BTguard Response to Q1: “It’s technically unfeasible for us to maintain log files with the amount of connections we route,” BTguard explain. Response to Q2: “The jurisdiction is Canada. TorGuard 1. 2.

xkcd Password Generator The button below will generate a random phrase consisting of four common words. According to yesterday’s xkcd strip, such phrases are hard to guess (even by brute force), but easy to remember, making them interesting password choices. It’s a novel idea, but xkcd stops short of actually recommending such passwords, and so will I. Use at your own peril! I’m not responsible for anything that happens as a result of your password choice. In case you missed the strip, here it is: Other generators have popped up online, but unlike most of those, this generator only uses common English words. The xkcd strip suggests 11 “bits of entropy” per word, which can be achieved using a list of 211 = 2048 words. It’s hard to be convinced about every detail in the strip, but it really had me thinking. What do you think? As far as password management goes, I’ve personally found KeePass to be an excellent solution.

What the Tech | Your Place for Tech Questions Welcome to What the Tech - Register now for FREE A community of volunteers who share their knowledge, and answer your tech questions. Register now to gain access to all of our features, it's FREE and only takes one minute. Once registered and logged in, you will be able to create topics, post replies to existing threads, give reputation to your fellow members, get your own private messenger, post status updates, manage your profile and so much more. Create an AccountLogin to Account <div class='message error'><strong>Javascript Disabled Detected</strong><p>You currently have javascript disabled. Toggle Spyware / Malware / Virus RemovalSpyware / Malware / Virus Removal Toggle SoftwareSoftware Toggle HardwareHardware Toggle DiscussionDiscussion

mashable An encryption flaw called the Heartbleed bug is already being dubbed one of the biggest security threats the Internet has ever seen. The bug has affected many popular websites and services — ones you might use every day, like Gmail and Facebook — and could have quietly exposed your sensitive account information (such as passwords and credit card numbers) over the past two years. But it hasn't always been clear which sites have been affected. Mashable reached out to some of the most popular social, email, banking and commerce sites on the web. We've rounded up their responses below. Some Internet companies that were vulnerable to the bug have already updated their servers with a security patch to fix the issue. Although changing your password regularly is always good practice, if a site or service hasn't yet patched the problem, your information will still be vulnerable. We'll keep updating the list as new information comes in. Social Networks Other Companies Email Stores and Commerce Other

Is Usenet Safer than BitTorrent? Shhh... Stick to bittorrent kid. Usenets the devil and I highly recommend against it. Geez. Thanks for the unneeded publicity. Flagged seriously? Good lord thank you for saying this. All this "the first rule of Usenet" BS has gone on for decades - give it up people, EVERYONE ALREADY KNOWS ABOUT USENET. Sorry "everyone" doesn't know about USENET. Like I mentioned to someone else in the same thread - the only barriers to everyone using usenet the same way everyone uses Bittorrent are inconvenience and cost - the fact that it's not easy, and most ISPs don't support binary newsgroups anymore. Sourceless numbers about p2p file sharing (numbers that clearly don't include BitTorrent) are beside the point, and make the assumption that the only use for Usenet is piracy, which I think is an argument you're not trying to make, are you? The percentage of the U.S. The number supplied pertains to sharing music, but one can safely assume the numbers hold for other types of file sharing.

Correct Horse Battery Staple: Better passwords with Vietnamese | Saigonist Inspired by XKCD, this is a password generator for those of you who know English and Vietnamese or another language. Once a random set of words in your languages has been generated, images for those words will be shown to help you visually remember your new password. If the random password seems too hard to remember, you can always spin the wheel a second time! Each time you click, 4 random words from the selected languages will be loaded. I chose the number 4 so as to not overload Google Image search, so you may want to run it twice to get 5 or more words for added security. I find that the images help to visually remember the password. If you still want a password like "! Your Random Password Click that button up there! The other day there was an XKCD strip about password security. A good password should be random. Plenty of software exists to come up with passwords made up of random characters. So a few thousand English words are generally useful.

Free Emergency Kit: Portable malware scanner | Free removal of Viruses, Bots, Spyware, Keyloggers and Trojans Will it run on my PC? Unless you have a rather outdated PC from the late 90s, the answer is most likely yes, assuming that you’re using Windows XP, Vista, 7 or 8 - with the latest service pack installed. From Vista onwards all features are fully functional on x64 systems too. While running, Emsisoft Emergency Kit uses about 200 MB of your RAM which is quite low considering the 10 million signatures that it must load. We're proud of these test results! CNET reviewer awards 5 out of 5 stars: In the right hands, Emsisoft Free Emergency Kit can bring powerful tools to bear on a wide range of PC troubles. PC Mag recommends: If you're the security go-to guy (or gal) in your family, workplace, or neighborhood, stick a copy of Emsisoft Emergency Kit on a USB drive and keep it with you. Editor's Choice It's a very useful and easy to use program!

How to Get One – Google Glass Close Google Glass Thanks for your interest. Keep an eye out for an email from glass-support@google.com. Join the conversation: Join the Glass Explorer Program Want to help shape the future of Glass? Become an Explorer Not ready to become an Explorer? * = Required field. If you are US based, visit us for a demo at one of our Basecamps in San Francisco, Los Angeles or New York. Click "Sign me up" to hear about the latest news and help shape the future of Glass. Privacy & Terms

How to Completely Anonymize Your BitTorrent Traffic with BTGuard KeePass Password Safe U.S. Coding Website GitHub Hit With Cyberattack BEIJING—A popular U.S. coding website is enduring an onslaught of Internet traffic meant for China’s most popular search engine, and security experts say the episode likely represents an attempt by China to shut down anticensorship tools. The attack on San Francisco-based GitHub Inc., a service used by programmers and major tech firms world-wide to develop software, appears to underscore how China’s Internet censors increasingly reach outside the country to clamp down on content they find objectionable. The Cyberspace Administration of China didn’t respond to a request for comment Sunday. Security experts said the traffic onslaught—called a distributed denial-of-service attack in Internet circles—directed huge amounts of traffic from overseas users of Chinese search giant Baidu Inc. to GitHub, paralyzing GitHub’s website at times. Specifically, the traffic was directed to two GitHub pages that linked to copies of websites banned in China, the experts said.

Test your server for Heartbleed (CVE-2014-0160) If there are problems, head to the FAQ Results are now cached globally for up to 6 hours. Enter a URL or a hostname to test the server for CVE-2014-0160. All good, seems fixed or unaffected! Uh-oh, something went wrong: Check what it means at the FAQ. It might mean that the server is safe, we just can't be 100% sure! Here is some data we pulled from the server memory: (we put YELLOW SUBMARINE there, and it should not have come back) Please take immediate action! You can specify a port like this example.com:4433. 443 by default. Go here for all your Heartbleed information needs. If you want to donate something, I've put a couple of buttons here.

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