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Top 10 Best Cheat Sheets and Tutorials for Linux / UNIX Commands

Top 10 Best Cheat Sheets and Tutorials for Linux / UNIX Commands
Cheat sheet act as a reference tool which provides cut and paste kind of commands to complete a specific task. I often recommend following set of best cheat sheets to students and IT professionals. It include Linux/UNIX command and shell scripting. Unix Toolbox This document is a collection of Unix/Linux/BSD commands and tasks which are useful for IT work or for advanced users. This is a practical guide with concise explanations, however the reader is supposed to know what s/he is doing. => Visit UNIX Toolbox UNIX Tutorial for Beginners A beginners guide to the Unix and Linux operating system. => Visit UNIX Tutorial for Beginners Linux Command and Learning Shell Tutorials You have Linux installed and running. => Visit Learning the shell Learn UNIX in 10 minutes This is something that I had given out to students (CAD user training) in years past. => Visit Learning UNIX in 10 minutes How To Look Like A UNIX Guru => Visit How To Look Like A UNIX Guru Linux command line reference Share this on:

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computers.tutsplus Did you know that you can play Tetris on your Mac? Of course you did, you can play lots of games. But did you know that there's already a Tetris game built in? In fact, if you know your way around Emacs, you can play a whole bunch of awesome retro games like pong and snake. Read on to see how. Create a "mountable" disk image in GNU/Linux In this article I will explain how to create a file that works like a USB drive -- without the "physical" side of a USB disk. The advantage of making such a file is that you can make it encrypted; as a result, nobody will ever be able to see what's in it unless they know the passphrase. As a first step, simply create a file that acts as a plain, un-encrypted container of information. Switching From Windows to Nix or a Newbie to Linux - 20 Useful Commands for Linux Newbies So you are planning to switch from Windows to Linux, or have just switched to Linux? Oops!!! what I am asking! For what else reason would you have been here. From my past experience when I was new to Nux, commands and terminal really scared me, I was worried about the commands, as to what extent I have to remember and memorise them to get myself fully functional with Linux.

Use GNURoot to install a GNU/Linux distribution on your Android device How many times have you been on the go and discovered that you needed to pull off some Linux-fu, but the only piece of tech you had was an Android device? Imagine if you were able to fire up a Linux command prompt on that device and make use of apt-get to install whatever command line tool you needed. Wget? No problem. 40 Terminal Tips and Tricks You Never Thought You Needed - Tuts+ Computer Skills Tutorial The Terminal is an exceptionally powerful tool, providing a command line interface to the underpinnings of OS X. It’s a topic we’ve covered at length before with our popular series Taming the Terminal. There’s a great deal that Terminal can do, from moving large numbers of files to changing preferences that we didn’t even know exist. To demonstrate just how versatile the Terminal is, I’ve rounded up 40 truly excellent Terminal tips and tricks that can come in very handy. All of the Terminal commands I’ll be showing you are perfectly safe to use and, when it comes to changing preferences, are completely reversible. Saying that, the Terminal is a fickle creature and leaves no margin for error so make sure you’re entering the commands exactly as they are written here.

Magic SysRq key The magic SysRq key is a key combination understood by the Linux kernel, which allows the user to perform various low-level commands regardless of the system's state. It is often used to recover from freezes, or to reboot a computer without corrupting the filesystem.[1] Its effect is similar to the computer's hardware reset button (or power switch) but with many more options and much more control. This key combination provides access to powerful features for software development and disaster recovery. In this sense, it can be considered a form of escape sequence. Principal among the offered commands are means to forcibly unmount file systems, kill processes, recover keyboard state, and write unwritten data to disk. With respect to these tasks, this feature serves as a tool of last resort.

10 Terminal Commands That Every Mac User Should Know - Tuts+ Computer Skills Tutorial The Terminal in OS X is often, in my opinion anyway, an overlooked area of the operating system. Most newcomers to Macs look at it with fear, as the sight of anything code-related or advanced is enough to put them off for life. Fortunately, you don't have to be scared of Terminal and think of it as a feature just for the tech-minded.

10 Tools To Add Some Spice To Your UNIX Shell Scripts There are some misconceptions that shell scripts are only for a CLI environment. You can easily use various tools to write GUI and/or network (socket) scripts under KDE or Gnome desktops. Shell scripts can make use of some of the GUI widget (menus, warning boxs, progress bars etc). You can always control the final output, cursor position on screen, various output effects, and so on. With the following tools you can build powerful, interactive, user friendly UNIX / Linux bash shell scripts. Creating GUI application is not just expensive task but task that takes time and patience.

CPU frequency scaling CPU frequency scaling enables the operating system to scale the CPU frequency up or down in order to save power. CPU frequencies can be scaled automatically depending on the system load, in response to ACPI events, or manually by userspace programs. CPU frequency scaling is implemented in Linux kernel, the infrastructure is called cpufreq. Since kernel 3.4 the necessary modules are loaded automatically and the recommended ondemand governor is enabled by default. However, userspace tools like cpupower, acpid, Laptop Mode Tools, or GUI tools provided for your desktop environment, may still be used for advanced configuration. Userspace tools

25 Terminal Tips Every Mac User Should Know Posted 12/11/2008 at 11:40am | by Johnathon Williams From customizing your Mac’s secret system preferences to remotely controlling another Mac or manipulating text files in a handful of sly ways, the terminal utility is more than just a Mac geek’s home base. It’s a place where, with a few expert tricks, all Mac users can feel right at home. If there’s a more neglected or misunderstood Mac utility than the Terminal, OS X’s built-in command-line app, we’ve yet to find it. In an age where Apple’s $200 smart phone offers the most intuitive graphical user interface the world has ever seen, turning to a text-only command-line window can seem stubbornly retro, reminding us of audiophiles who vociferously insist that vinyl records sound better than music CDs. But there are plenty of reasons for using the command line beyond mere nostalgia: speed, flexibility, and familiarity with OS fundamentals, to name a few.

How To Quickly Optimize Jpeg Images on Linux A small cat, a large file-size Let’s say you need to compress and optimize a JPEG image on Linux. How do you do it? Nick Farina - Git Is Simpler Than You Think It was about one year ago that we switched to Git. Previously, we used Subversion, through the Mac app Versions, which (rightly) holds an Apple Design Award. I made the executive decision to leave our comfy world of Versions because it seemed clear that Git was winning the Internet. There was much grumbling from my teammates, who were busy enough doing actual work thank you very much.

11 Unix Commands Every Mac Geek Should Know Posted 01/31/2011 at 2:26pm | by Cory Bohon Just imagine, a little over 20 years ago we were barely able to drag a mouse across the screen, let alone get around a desktop interface without typing in a few command lines. Forunately, things have drastically changed, but the command line still provides a powerful way of interacting with your Mac. Unfortunately, most Mac users never dive into Unix because of how intimidating it can seem at first. But familiarizing yourself with it -- even a little bit -- is a great way to build up your coding arsenal. We rounded up some of the most utilized Unix commands you should know so you can get started tinkering with Terminal.

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