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Typing Practice for Programmers

Typing Practice for Programmers
Practice typing the awkward characters in code. No drills — type through open source code in JavaScript, Ruby, C, C++, Java, PHP, Perl, Haskell, Scala, and more. Eliminate the mistyped keys delaying every edit-compile-test iteration. Your browser does not support the JavaScript and CSS features required by typing.io. However, you can enable these features without switching browsers by installing Google Chrome Frame. The installation does not require admin access and will only affect sites like typing.io that explicitly opt in.

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Google partners with Udacity to offer Nanodegree in Android development Google has launched a new effort, in partnership with online learning service Udacity, to help developers become more skilled and capable at developing for the Android platform. The company has created a new credential called a Nanodegree based on a curriculum designed to take 9 to 12 months to complete. The coursework can be completed on your own schedule, but Google suggests at least 10 hours per week be devoted to the effort. The fee is $200 per month although a one week free trial is currently being offered as part of the launch. In addition to the traditional coursework, students will be engaged in several projects to produce actual apps, add features and capabilities, prepare them for production, and implement Material design concepts.

The Rise of ``Worse is Better'' Previous: Lisp's Apparent Failures Up: Lisp's Apparent Failures Next: Good Lisp Programming is Hard I and just about every designer of Common Lisp and CLOS has had extreme exposure to the MIT/Stanford style of design. The essence of this style can be captured by the phrase ``the right thing.'' To such a designer it is important to get all of the following characteristics right:

How to Debug One of the painful parts of teaching a lab-based embedded systems course is that over and over I have to watch a team with a relatively simple bug in their code, but who is trying to fix it by repeatedly making random changes. Generally they start with code that’s pretty close to working and break it worse and worse. By the end of the lab they’re frustrated, aren’t any closer to finding the bug, and have made a complete mess of their code, forcing them to go back to the previous day or week’s version. A typical Computer Science curriculum fails to teach debugging in any serious way. I’m not talking about teaching students to use debugging tools.

Bokeh, quietly logging memories Facebook is great for extroverted folks who want to broadcast their thoughts and photos to a lot of people. A new service called Bokeh, though, is geared for those who want something closer to a private journal -- though not too close. Michael Zhang and Mike Zupan just launched Bokeh on Tuesday, offering the inevitable iOS app with an online site where people can store photos and thoughts. It's a spinoff from PetaPixel, the photography blog Zhang founded and of which he's now editor in chief. There are plenty of journaling services available, but Zhang generally thinks they're too private.

Coding Horror: Cultivate Teams, Not Ideas How much is a good idea worth? According to Derek Sivers, not much: It's so funny when I hear people being so protective of ideas. (People who want me to sign an NDA to tell me the simplest idea.) To me, ideas are worth nothing unless executed. They are just a multiplier. Learn To Code, Learn To Think : 13.7: Cosmos And Culture Is learning to code software a valuable skill? Is it one that prepares people to join the workforce of the future? On the one hand, the popularity of computer science as a college major and the proliferation of coding bootcamps suggest the answer is decidedly "yes." Code.org, a non-profit that encourages education and diversity in computer science, currently invites visitors to its homepage to join over a million others in agreeing with the following statement:

What “Worse is Better vs The Right Thing” is really about I thought about this one for a couple of years, then wrote it up, and left it untouched for another couple of years. What prompted me to publish it now - at least the first, relatively finished part - is Steve Yegge's post, an analogy between the "liberals vs conservatives" debate in politics and some dichotomies in the professional worldviews of software developers. The core of his analogy is risk aversion: conservatives are more risk averse than liberals, both in politics and in software. I want to draw a similar type of analogy, but from a somewhat different angle. My angle is, in politics, one thing that people view rather differently is the role of markets and competition. Some view them as mostly good and others as mostly evil.

Netflix Open Sources “Resilience Engineering” Code Library Hystrix: it’s the genus name for “Old World” porcupines, and it’s also the latest release from Netflix. But you won’t see it in their catalog of movie and TV titles, and you can’t add it to your queue, because it’s not content–it’s how Netflix makes sure its content is highly available. Now, Netflix has made Hystrix open source, for anyone using Amazon Web Services (AWS) to implement in their own cloud applications. Read on for details on this “resilience engineering” code library. Mention Netflix, and most people will think of the company’s DVD-rental-by-mail service or its growing library of “Watch Instantly” streaming video titles. But Netflix has developed internal infrastructure to supplement the AWS cloud, on which many Netflix services run, and has started releasing some of that code under open source licenses for any developer to use.

Live.pics.io lets you narrate online slideshows in the moment Miss the days of real-world slideshows, when your guests would come by to see your vacation photos and hear you tell the story behind the shots? Ukrainian startup TopTechPhoto launched a service called Live.pics.io on Wenesday that aims to reproduce the experience online. The service works over a private chat room on the Web, but the company plans to launch a Facebook app in a week or two that uses the service, too. Sites such as Flickr or Facebook are fine for sharing photos, but they aren't set up for a live conversational tour of a photo gallery. Screen-sharing services can help, but they can mean lousy resolution -- the last thing you want while looking at photos. "Basically, it's live collaborative image sharing: images are accompanied with the voice of the session host in a real-time," said Konstantin Shtondenko, chief business development officer.

5 Great Resources To Learn How To Code However, more often than not, there seems to be a problem of actually finding good content online that can teach you to code. Experimenting with a language can only get you so far. To master it, you need to have proper guidance from people who actually know what they are talking about. So where can you find expert guidance without shelling out a fortune for it? You could start with checking out the websites below: Coding in the Classroom: 16 Top Resources As cool as technology is, its intricacies and inner workings are sometimes intimidating, especially for young people who may be more interested in what technology can do for them rather than what they can do with technology. However, when students hurdle that obstacle and see the value of computer science — specifically coding — they gain a broadened perspective and the potential for a rewarding career in the tech field. The following resources will help you teach your students the basics of coding and will provide tips on how to keep kids interested as you go. Tools to Use in Class Can you make coding fun for your students? Absolutely!

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