background preloader

NoteStar : A Project Based Learning Research Tool

NoteStar : A Project Based Learning Research Tool

15 Great Timeline Creation Web Tools and iPad Apps for Teachers and Students January 28, 2014 The possibilities for the use of timeline tools in the class are endless. Whether you want to teach salient historical incidents, chronological order of events, or explain a developmental process in biology or simply outline the major learning curves for the year, timeline creation tools are the ideal platforms to implement. A timeline is a visual representation that features information in connected sequences over a given period of time. The importance of timelines lies in the fact that they enable students to easily comprehend and internalize information, chronological sequences, and dates.Students can also use these tools to participate actively and in building new learning experiences. They are excellent tools for conducting scholarly research and sharing knowledge. That being said, I have done a lot of scouring and compiled the list below. 1- Timeline Student Interactive 2- Timeline JS This is a relatively new web tool that I am mentioning here for the first time.

A Must Have Google Drive App for Teachers May 8, 2014 Since the introduction of add-ons to Google Drive a few weeks ago, I tried several of these extensions on my Google Drive and I am really impressed by the great service some of them offer. Today, I am sharing with you one of my favourite apps to use on Google Sheets. This add-on is called Doctopus. Doctopus is a handy Spreadhseet script which allows teachers to make copies and hand out google Drive files to students listed in a Google Sheet. Doctopus also allows teachers to keep track of their shared documents with the possibility of providing timely feedback to students right in the spreadsheet itself. Watch the video below to learn more about how to use Doctopus on your Google Sheets. storyful GoConqr - Changing the way you learn eduCanon

Evri Timeline Timeline allows students to create a graphical representation of an event or process by displaying items sequentially along a line. Timelines can be organized by time of day, date, or event, and the tool allows users to create a label with short or long descriptive text. Adding an image for each label makes a timeline more visually appealing. Add, drag, and rearrange items as needed. Saving capability allows students to return to their work and make revisions, and they can share their final work via e-mail. For additional ideas on how to use this tool outside of the classroom, see Timeline in the Parent & Afterschool Resources section. Related Classroom & Professional Development Resources back to top Grades 11 – 12 | Lesson Plan | Standard Lesson A Blast from the Past with Nuclear Chemistry Grades 6 – 8 | Lesson Plan | Standard Lesson Timelines and Texts: Motivating Students to Read Nonfiction Grades 3 – 12 | Student Interactive | Organizing & Summarizing Graphic Map Plot Diagram Timeline

How Teaching Is Changing: 15 Examples How Teaching Is Changing: 15 New Realities Every Educator Faces by Terry Heick It’s tempting to say that no matter how much technology pushes on education, every teacher will always need to know iconic teacher practices like assessment, curriculum design, classroom management, and cognitive coaching. This may end up being true–how education changes in the next 20 years is a choice rather than the inevitable tidal wave of social and technological change it’s easy to sit back and wait for. Think of the very limited change in education since 2000 compared to the automotive industry, computer industry, retail consumer industry, etc. Huge leaps forward are not a foregone conclusion. But it’s probably going to be a bit different than that. We’ve written before about the kinds of “things” modern teachers must be able to do. (Hint: It’s no longer about classroom management, testing, and content delivery.) 1. The Difference: Precision 2. The Old: Numbers, letters, and maybe a bar graph or pie chart

Storyboard That: The World's Best FREE Online Storyboard Creator 6 Tips for Getting Started with Genius Hour Posted 05/22/2014 2:36PM | Last Commented 02/02/2015 11:36AM Genius hour is a great way to allow students to drive their own personalized instruction but where to begin such a big project? How to Get Started There are a lot of resources out there already, and most of the teachers that are embarking on this process are willing to share what they have or help you problem solve. The following all have something to offer: Practical Tips Face to Face time is invaluable: While the students are working independently you are still there helping them focus and problem solve. Apps That Rise to the Top: Tested and Approved By Teachers Michelle Luhtala/Edshelf With the thousands of educational apps vying for the attention of busy teachers, it can be hard to sift for the gold. Michelle Luhtala, a savvy librarian from New Canaan High School in Connecticut has crowd-sourced the best, most extensive list of apps voted on by educators around the country. “I wanted to make sure we had some flexibility because there’s no one app that’s better than all the others,” Luhtala said. Some apps are best for younger students, others are more complicated, better suited for high school students. Many apps do one thing really well, but aren’t great at everything. 30Hands allows a user to make pictures, annotate them, record a voice explainer and then packages it all into a video. Adobe Voice is a recently released education product from Adobe that allows students to narrate a story over an array of digital images. Tellagami is a tool to share quick animated messages. ExplainEverything is another tool for creating video like tutorials.

Reinventing School From the Ground Up For Inquiry Learning By Thom Markham A grave miscalculation exists in the minds of many educators: That inquiry-based learning, project based learning, and 21st century competencies can flourish in industrial model schools. Under this world view, the inquiry goals of the Common Core State Standards are “strategies” to be added to the existing list of classroom techniques, while skills like collaboration, communication, or creativity can be taught despite 43-minute periods, desks in rows, and pacing guides set in stone. In other words, reaching the top of Bloom’s Taxonomy is important, but less so than maintaining regimental order. But what we know—from industry and neuroscience—is that organizational structure, environment, and human performance are deeply intertwined. This redesign issue looms large. But a historical moment has arrived. How to develop this ecosystem? Beyond that, the ecosystem metaphor works. So bravery and imagination might need an ally: Deep inquiry of our own. Related

Related: