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What You Need to Know About MOOC's - Technology

What You Need to Know About MOOC's - Technology
We'll be updating this page regularly.Please check back for updates. Call it the year of the mega-class. Colleges and professors have rushed to try a new form of online teaching known as MOOCs—short for "massive open online courses." The courses raise questions about the future of teaching, the value of a degree, and the effect technology will have on how colleges operate. Struggling to make sense of it all? If you'd like to learn more about MOOCs in a condensed format, try reading "Beyond the MOOC Hype: A Guide to Higher Education's High-Tech Disruption," a new e-book by The Chronicle's technology editor. What are MOOCs? MOOCs are classes that are taught online to large numbers of students, with minimal involvement by professors. Why all the hype? Advocates of MOOCs have big ambitions, and that makes some college leaders nervous. These are like OpenCourseWare projects, right? Sort of. So if you take tests, do you get credit? Who are the major players? edX Coursera Udacity Khan Academy Udemy May 2 Related:  moocs und wissenschaftl. theorien

How to Succeed in a Massive Online Open Course (MOOC) by Apostolos Koutropoulos & Rebecca J. Hogue “MOOCs provide a new methodology and modality for teaching and learning. This newness does pose some problems for learners, but also provides for exciting new possibilities. MOOCs require learners to be more proactive in their education and in building their personal learning networks (PLNs). Everyone can be successful in a MOOC, provided that certain steps are taken and strategies devised before, during, and after a MOOC.” In the past couple of years, massive online open courses (MOOCs) have become a trend among many members of the educational online community. The course Connectivism and Connective Knowledge (CCK), by Stephen Downes, has been offered at least three times since 2008, and additional MOOCs have been offered that cater to a variety of learning topics including digital storytelling, mobile learning (mLearning), learning analytics, the future of education, and instructional ideas for online success, just to name a few. The structure and design of each MOOC varies. Questions

Smoke and mirrors mask corruption at Pennsylvania’s largest cyber-charter school By Carmel DeAmicis On August 26, 2013 For the last decade, cyber charter schools have been springing up all over the country. Cyber schools give classes over the Internet to students in grades K-12, who get their education entirely online instead of in a brick-and-mortar location. Despite the lack of research into these schools’ educational quality, in recent years some states have removed limitations to their growth. Pennsylvania is one such state pioneering cyber charter schools. On Friday, the founder of Pennsylvania’s bigger charter school — PA Cyber — was charged with fraud, for funneling $8 million of the school’s funds into his personal companies and holdings. The indictment raises questions about whether regulatory bodies need to monitor cyber schools more closely. Youth cyber school programs are controversial in education. Critics have also pointed to the for-profit motive behind many cyber charter schools that distorts the educational purpose and leads to inflated costs.

Understanding MOOCs from the perspective of Actor Network Theory (ANT): Refraiming pedagogy and unmasking power | markusmind (Nach zwei erfolglosen Versuchen, das Paper bei einer Zeitschrift zu platzieren, stelle ich es nun hier zur Verfügung.) Understanding MOOCs from the perspective of Actor Network Theory (ANT) Refraiming pedagogy and unmasking power Massively Open Online Courses (MOOCs) are without any doubt currently one of the hottest developments in open and flexible learning as indicated by a broad mass media coverage and several scholarly events (conferences, special issues in academic journals etc). Many of the aspects that are on top of controversial debates (drop-out rates, accreditation, quality) re-echo claims and arguments being made over forty years during the time when distance education hit the educational landscape (Peters, 2010). In this sense, MOOCs are portrayed as a “closed technological offering” to be utilized and acted upon according to personal learning goals. With regards to MOOCs, ANT offers a tool to understand how the social and technological are embedded in each other.

Applying Cognitive Psychology to Enhance Educational Practice Edssential article from Robert Bjork : The primary goal of this research, which is funded by the James S. McDonnell foundation, is to promote learning and memory performance within educational contexts through the investigation of principles in cognitive psychology. Studies address issues of transfer-appropriate and material-appropriate processing between encoding and retrieval. Applying tests in order to enhance learning and determining the desirable amount and timing of feedback regarding an individual’s memory performance are methods that are currently under investigation. The overlying theme of “desirable difficulties,” first introduced by Robert Bjork (1994), is also explored through manipulations in the spacing of learning events and the study schedule produced by interleaving various to-be-learned items, such as English-Swahili translated word pairs or prose materials. Read More About the Author Social Share

Ten Useful Reports on #MOOCs and Online Education Supported by the Norwegian Ministry of Education and Research, the International Council for Open and Distance Education (ICDE) is the leading global membership organization for open, distance, flexible and online education, including e-learning, and draws its membership from institutions, educational authorities, commercial actors, and individuals. ICDE was founded in 1938 in Canada as the International Council for Correspondence Education and today has members from over 60 countries worldwide. Recently, ICDE had provided a digest of reports and papers published over the past year on MOOCs and online education. To check out these useful reports on MOOCs and online education, here is the link. Tagged as: massive open online courses, Mooc, online education, online learning

Don’t Go Back to School: How to Fuel the Internal Engine of Learning by Maria Popova “When you step away from the prepackaged structure of traditional education, you’ll discover that there are many more ways to learn outside school than within.” “The present education system is the trampling of the herd,” legendary architect Frank Lloyd Wright lamented in 1956. Half a century later, I started Brain Pickings in large part out of frustration and disappointment with my trampling experience of our culturally fetishized “Ivy League education.” I found myself intellectually and creatively unstimulated by the industrialized model of the large lecture hall, the PowerPoint presentations, the standardized tests assessing my rote memorization of facts rather than my ability to transmute that factual knowledge into a pattern-recognition mechanism that connects different disciplines to cultivate wisdom about how the world works and a moral lens on how it should work. People who forgo school build their own infrastructures. I learned how to teach myself.

IS UNIT WEB SITE - IPTS - JRC - EC MOOCKnowledge MOOCKnowledge is a 3-year study that aims to develop a knowledge base with a European view on MOOCs through continuous and systematic collection and analysis of data on existing MOOC initiatives to advance scientific understanding of this new phenomenon. The study consists of a series of surveys (in different time periods) of the learners of MOOCs offered by the OpenUpEd partners and other European providers willing to collaborate with the study. Building a knowledge base for European MOOCs The study consortium wants to make agreements with as many MOOC providers as possible to produce large-scale data basis allowing analysing the MOOC-phenomenon from a European perspective based on scientific evidence. Partners The MOOCKnowledge study is funded by the European Commission's Institute for Prospective Technological Studies (IPTS). Contact Project Leader (ICT for Learning & Skills): Yves Punie Project coordinator (MOOCKnowledge): Jonatan Castaño Muñoz

The MOOC Problem The purpose of education is in large part linked to its standing as a social science. Philosophers dating back to Socrates have linked education to a purpose beyond the individual, one where accrual of facts and training in skills is not the outcome or objective for the individual nor society; rather, a deeper relationship with thought and reason is necessary for the development of each person and in turn their community. This is at the heart of much great philosophy: luminaries such as Locke, Milton, Rousseau, Hume and others saw education as a continuation of society through means greater than memory recall and skilled competencies. This is not the methodology from which most outside interests view education. The MOOC in popular discussion is a learning model drowned in tropes and hyperbole where words ignore their historical meanings and commentary is only designed for short-term efficacy. Hybrid Pedagogy uses an open collaborative peer review process.

The Professors Behind the MOOC Hype - Technology Dave Chidley for The Chronicle Paul Gries, of the U. of Toronto, has taught MOOCs on computer science. By Steve Kolowich What is it like to teach 10,000 or more students at once, and does it really work? The largest-ever survey of professors who have taught MOOCs, or massive open online courses, shows that the process is time-consuming, but, according to the instructors, often successful. The survey, conducted by The Chronicle, attempted to reach every professor who has taught a MOOC. Hype around these new free online courses has grown louder and louder since a few professors at Stanford University drew hundreds of thousands of students to online computer-science courses in 2011. Princeton University's Robert Sedgewick is one of them. Like many professors at top-ranked institutions, Mr. His online course drew 80,000 students when it opened last summer, but Sedgewick was not daunted. It paid off. Therefore the positive response may come as a surprise to some observers. Why They MOOC Mr.

14 Articles on MOOCs Size Isn’t Everything – Cathy Davidson – The Chronicle Review – The Chronicle of Higher Education Wired UK raises the possibility that the university may have to restructure itself. That undoubtedly will raise numerous hackles. Online Learning – The Chronicle of Higher Education MOOC Madness. Massive Open Online Courses Views & Research – The Conversation The Conversation about MOOCs. Educause. 7 things you should know about MOOCs. What You Need to Know About MOOCs – Technology – The Chronicle of Higher Education What are MOOCs? The End of the University as We Know It – Nathan Harden – The American Interest Magazine In fifty years, if not much sooner, half of the roughly 4,500 colleges and universities now operating in the United States will have ceased to exist. THE MOOC MODEL FOR DIGITAL PRACTICE: Siemens, Cormier, et alia What is a MOOC? MOOCs chapter of Curt Bonk’s Monster Syllabus great article collection A pedagogy of abundance or a pedagogy to support human beings? 06 Aug 12 25 Jul 12

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