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The Sequence of Archetypes in Individuation

The Sequence of Archetypes in Individuation
DynaPsych Table of Contents James Whitlark Professor of English Texas Tech University Scattered throughout Jung’s writings are a few references to the sequence of archetypes associated with stages of individuation. These archetypes constitute the configurations of the unconscious at various points in human development. The meeting with oneself is, at first, the meeting with one’s own shadow.… Whoever looks into the water sees his own image, but behind it …[s]ometimes a nixie gets into the fisherman’s net.… The nixie is an even more instinctive version of a magical feminine being whom I call the anima.… Only when all props and crutches are broken, and no cover from the rear offers even the slightest hope of security does it become possible for us to experience an archetype that up to then had hidden behind the meaningful nonsense played out by the anima. —C. The above description of the archetypes’ sequence sprawls over twenty-two, highly metaphorical paragraphs.

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