background preloader

The Best Posts On The “Flipped Classroom” Idea

The Best Posts On The “Flipped Classroom” Idea
Check out my two-part Education Week Teacher series on the flipped classroom here I’m a bit wary/skeptical about whole “Flipped Classroom” idea and how it works in practice. Diana Laufenberg spoke for me, also, in some of her tweets about the concept: But I’m still open to learning, and I invite your suggestions for additions to list. In the meantime, though, here are some posts that some of my questions more eloquently than I could: The Flipped Classroom: Pro and Con is by Mary Beth Hertz and appeared in Edutopia. ‘Flipping’ classrooms: Does it make sense? Three Questions To Consider Before We All Flip is by Richard Byrne. Should You Flip Your Classroom? Flipping for the Flipped Classroom Seems To Be the Trend but Not for Me is by Pernille Ripp. I’ve Copyrighted “Flipped Classroom” is by Troy Cockrum. Flipped classrooms: Let’s change the discussion is by Brian Bennett. Flipped Classroom Resources is a Google Doc from Dan Spencer. Educators Evaluate ‘Flipped Classrooms’ is from Education Week.

http://larryferlazzo.edublogs.org/2012/08/11/the-best-posts-on-the-flipped-classroom-idea/

Related:  Teaching resourcesFlipped2Flipped classroomClasse inversée

Three Good Tools for Building Flipped Lessons That Include Assessment Tools In the right setting the flipped classroom model can work well for some teachers and students. I recently received an email from a reader who was looking for a recommendation for a tool would enable her to add an assessment aspect to her flipped lesson. Here are some tools that can accomplish that goal. eduCanon is a free service for creating, assigning, and tracking your students' progress on flipped lessons. eduCanon allows teachers to build flipped lessons using YouTube and Vimeo videos, create questions about the videos, then assign lessons to their students. Teachers can track the progress of their students within eduCanon. To create lessons start by identifying a topic and objective then searching YouTube and Vimeo from within the eduCanon site.

10 Common Misconceptions About The Flipped Classroom 10 Common Misconceptions About The Flipped Classroom by Kelly Walsh, emergingedtech.com What have you heard about the flipped classroom? That it’s just the latest education fad? This Website Shows You What Reading Is Like When You’re Dyslexic A website created last week is providing a fascinating look into what some forms of dyslexia look like, and the results are a must-see. The goal is for people without dyslexia to appreciate how hard it can be to read or do math for their peers who do. The website isn't an across-the-board view of what it's like to have dyslexia, but it's an eye-opening experience to see words and letters so distorted. “A friend who has dyslexia described to me how she experiences reading.

The Power of Imagery in Teaching and Writing 808 Flares Twitter 9 Facebook 783 Google+ 10 LinkedIn 6 inShare6 808 Flares × Once upon a time there was a girl who had great admiration for trees, paths, and open spaces. She often went on long, lonely walks accompanied by a willful imagination and a quest for ‘ahas’ m-attacks. 32 Apps Dyslexic Students Will Love for Everyday Learning As the days of summer fun come to a close, thoughts of reading assignments, worksheets, and essays return to the forefront of many students’ minds. For students with dyslexia, work that requires reading and writing can be daunting, and it often saps the enjoyment out of school. Fortunately, more and more families and schools are discovering assistive technology (AT) and the ability it has to lessen stress and give children a greater sense of academic independence. While many schools have folded technology into the classroom, students are also increasingly using their own smartphones and tablets. The built-in accessibility features (e.g., text-to-speech, dictation, word prediction) of mobile operating systems have made those devices extremely useful for dyslexic students, and the variety of AT-related apps flooding Apple’s App Store and Google’s Play Store raise the level of assistance to an even higher level. Reading Apps

Engage Students with Flipped Video Tasks The concept of the flipped classroom seems to be gaining ever increasing momentum within the field of education generally. Much of this revolves around the use of video to deliver input / lectures to students who can then come to class and do the more engaging and practical part of their work with some teacher support. One of the major criticisms of this method though is that a dull unengaging content doesn't suddenly become engaging because it's on a video on the web, so how do we get students to engage with the content and make sure they watch it in a challenging and interactive way. Vialogues is a useful tool for attempting to do this (though dull content will always be dull) because it enables you to create interaction around the video that actually gets students to think about and engage with the content. Here's an example Vialogue I created around one of my own (rather old) short videos. I hope you enjoy it.Related links:

What Is The Role Of Content In Flipped Classrooms? In a flipped classroom, students ‘attend’ the lesson outside of the classroom, typically in the form of teacher presentation videos or animated slide shows that can be viewed online, and in more sophisticated instances, followed by some diagnostic tests to indicate the progress of each student in the understanding of the material presented in that lesson. The intent is for students to know enough of the topic (to be taught in class) and, having reflected adequately on the ideas they encountered at home, return to class with questions to clarify their understanding. The benefits of a flipped classroom are progressively recognized and relatively well-documented (Fulton, 2012; Bergmann & Sams, 2013; Bergmann 2011; Ash, 2012). In its ideal state, a flipped classroom can transform the learning experience of students. Why Flip?

The Seven Best Short Animated Films for the Language Classroom - Kieran Donaghy Animated films are ones in which individual drawings, paintings, or illustrations are photographed frame by frame. Traditionally animated films have been associated with children, however, nowadays they are designed to appeal to everyone. With the increased ease of creating animations, there has been a huge rise in the number of animated films being produced, and the vast majority of these are short animations. Many of these short animated films can be exploited in the language classroom as they are short enough to be used in a single session, offer a complete narrative in a short space of time, have a unique capacity of grabbing and holding students’ attention, and deal with contemporary subjects and issues, such as bullying, racism, sexism, homelessness, and human rights, which are relevant to students’ lives. Here are my seven favourite animated short films for the language classroom. Paperman

Related: