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A Software Defined Radio in C#

SDR# (read SDR Sharp) is a high performance Software Defined Radio application. It is written in C# with both object design correctness and performance in mind. The project started as a simple proof of concept program to get hands into DSP techniques and has evolved to what it is today: A fully featured SDR capable of handling samplerates from kHz level soundcards up to multi hundred MHz dedicated samplers, thanks to its multi-core architecture. The source code is disclosed for educational purposes and for reference to those who want to build their own plugins. Do you still think C# is too slow for DSP? Give it a try and compare with some Intel’s IPP powered concurrents out there.

http://sdrsharp.com/

Related:  GNU_RadioSDRSDR - Software Defined Radio

R820T Archives Over on the SDRSharp Yahoo group, HB9AJG has posted an interesting report in a PDF file containing some measurements (Note you will need to be a member of the group to download the file titled “Some Measurements on E4000 and R820 Tuners.pdf”. Here is a Direct Mirror of the file.) quantifying the performance of both the E4000 and R820T RTL-SDR DVB-T dongles. See the discussion in the Yahoo group here. These results confirm the feeling that many RTL-SDR users have had: that the E4000 is more sensitive in the lower frequencies, and that the R820T is more sensitive in the higher frequencies, which is why it is recommended for ADS-B.

Upconverter Comparison: Nooelec Ham it Up vs SDR Up 100 A few weeks ago Akos from the SDR for Mariners blog did a review of the SDR Up 100 Upconverter, and he promised to compare it with the Nooelec Ham-it-up Upconverter when it arrived. He has now done the comparison, and written about it on his blog. For each test he used a gain of 0dB and the same 20 foot random wire antenna. Interestingly, his results show that the SDR Up 100 significantly outperforms the Ham-it-up upconverter. We believe that this may be as the SDR Up 100 has an LNA built into it whereas the Ham it up does not. kochmorse - Koch Morse Tutor for Linux KochMorse is a easy to use morse tutor (trainer) for Linux using the Koch-mehtod. It provides a clean and modern graphical interface. The current release (version 0.99.x) is full featured and stable. I've tested it under Fedora and Ubuntu and it works well. If you have trouble to get it running or you like to see any features added, please contact me by mail: hmatuschek [at] gmail [dot] com .

Beginner Antennas Antenna size depends on the frequency you want to hear: higher frequency (bigger number) - smaller antenna. You need an antenna that receives signals from all directions - called omnidirectional.Materials make no difference: any type of wire is good, as long as it keeps its shape. Metal coat hangers are popular, multi-stranded or solid makes no difference. I'm a fan of No 10 house grounding wire. You need to connect your antenna to your RTL stick: coax cable is needed, read my hardware guide for details. Recommended beginner antenna rtl-sdr – OsmoSDR DVB-T dongles based on the Realtek RTL2832U can be used as a cheap SDR, since the chip allows transferring the raw I/Q samples to the host, which is officially used for DAB/DAB+/FM demodulation. The possibility of this has been discovered by Eric Fry (​History and Discovery of RTLSDR). Antti Palosaari has not been involved in development of rtl-sdr.

operation with a Realtek RTL2832U USB dongle DVB-T receiver | GNSS-SDR - An Open Source Global Navigation Satellite System Software Defined Receiver Introduction This article describes what is probably one of the cheapest ways for experimenting with real-life signals and GNSS-SDR. This is product from a combined effort of many people, so let us only mention (to our knowledge) the very original source, the V4L/DVB kernel developer Antti Palosaari, who discovered an undocumented operation mode for some USB DVB-T dongles based on the Realtek RTL2832U chipset, enabling them to be used as a cheap Software Defined Radio (SDR) front-end. The key feature is that the chip allows transferring raw I/Q samples to the host, that in principle is the responsible for DAB/DVB+/FM demodulation. This is great news for a GNSS software receiver, since it covers the targeted frequency bands. The RTL2832U outputs 8-bit I/Q-samples with a baseband sample-rate up to 3.2 MSPS, according to the specifications.

How to build a satellite receiving station using a Raspberry Pi Space and satellites are something that only few people are fortunate enough to interact with. However, this is starting to change due to the rapid growth in capability of consumer electronics. In fact, you can receive and decode transmissions from satellites using only a Raspberry Pi, a USB software-defined radio receiver, and a few other cheap parts. In this blog post, I'll describe in detail how to put together such a system. Experimenting with receiving satellite signals is a lot of fun.

bladeRF - USB 3.0 Software Defined Radio by Nuand As wireless technologies become ubiquitous, Software Defined Radios (SDR) are gaining popularity. Unlike most radios transceivers found in phones, WiFi devices, remote controls, etc. that can only communicate using specific wireless modulation schemes, Software Defined Radios are completely software based, which allows them to communicate with devices across the RF spectrum. Besides interacting with existing wireless devices, SDRs allow for the development of new wireless systems and protocols using intuitive software tools and APIs. bladeRF is a platform designed to enable a community of hobbyists, and professionals to explore and experiment with the multidisciplinary facets of RF communication.

Amateur Radio Exam Generator - Spectrum Management and Telecommunications Amended April/2007 Amateur Radio Service Home Page a learning aid for prospective amateurs an administrative tool for accredited examiners

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