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George Orwell

George Orwell
Eric Arthur Blair (25 June 1903 – 21 January 1950),[1] known by his pen name George Orwell, was an English novelist, essayist, journalist and critic. His work is marked by lucid prose, awareness of social injustice, opposition to totalitarianism, and commitment to democratic socialism.[2][3] Commonly ranked as one of the most influential English writers of the 20th century and as one of the most important chroniclers of English culture of his generation,[4] Orwell wrote literary criticism, poetry, fiction and polemical journalism. He is best known for the dystopian novel Nineteen Eighty-Four (1949) and the allegorical novella Animal Farm (1945). His book Homage to Catalonia (1938), an account of his experiences in the Spanish Civil War, is widely acclaimed, as are his numerous essays on politics, literature, language, and culture. In 2008, The Times ranked him second on a list of "The 50 greatest British writers since 1945".[5] Life[edit] Early years[edit] Playing fields at St.

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George Orwell George Orwell [pseudonym of Eric Arthur Blair] (1903-1950), journalist, political author and novelist wrote Animal Farm (1945) and Nineteen Eighty-Four (1949); “It was one of those pictures which are so contrived that the eyes follow you about when you move. BIG BROTHER IS WATCHING YOU, the caption beneath it ran.” Nineteen Eighty-Four History and title[edit] A 1947 draft manuscript of the first page of Nineteen Eighty-Four, showing the editorial development. The Last Man in Europe was an early title for the novel but in a letter dated 22 October 1948 to his publisher Fredric Warburg, eight months before publication, Orwell wrote about hesitating between The Last Man in Europe and Nineteen Eighty-Four.[14] Warburg suggested changing the main title to a more commercial one.[15] Copyright status[edit] The novel will be in the public domain in the European Union and Russia in 2021 and in the United States in 2044.[21] It is already in the public domain in Canada;[22] South Africa,[23] Argentina[24] Australia,[25] and Oman.[26] Background[edit]

Alan Moore Alan Moore (born 18 November 1953) is an English writer primarily known for his work in comic books including Watchmen, V for Vendetta, and From Hell.[1] Frequently described as the best graphic novel writer in history,[2][3] he has been called "one of the most important British writers of the last fifty years".[4] He has occasionally used such pseudonyms as Curt Vile, Jill de Ray, Translucia Baboon and The Original Writer. Moore is an occultist, ceremonial magician,[6] and anarchist,[7] and has featured such themes in works including Promethea, From Hell, and V for Vendetta, as well as performing avant-garde spoken word occult "workings" with The Moon and Serpent Grand Egyptian Theatre of Marvels, some of which have been released on CD. Early life[edit] Democratic socialism Democratic socialism is a political ideology advocating a democratic political system alongside a socialist economic system. This may refer to extending principles of democracy in the economy (such as through cooperatives or workplace democracy), or may simply refer to trends of socialism that emphasise democratic principles as inalienable from their political project. There is no exact definition of democratic socialism.

George Orwell - Author, Journalist George Orwell was an English novelist, essayist, and critic most famous for his novels Animal Farm (1945) and Nineteen Eighty-four (1949). Synopsis Born Eric Arthur Blair in Motihari, Bengal, India, in 1903, George Orwell, novelist, essayist and critic, went on to become best known for his novels Animal Farm and Nineteen Eighty-Four. Early Life Born Eric Arthur Blair, George Orwell created some of the sharpest satirical fiction of the 20th century with such works as Animal Farm and Nineteen Eighty-Four. He was a man of strong opinions who addressed some of the major political movements of his times, including imperialism, fascism and communism.

Big Brother (Nineteen Eighty-Four) In the society that Orwell describes, every citizen is under constant surveillance by the authorities, mainly by telescreens. The people are constantly reminded of this by the phrase "Big Brother is watching you", the maxim ubiquitous on display. Since the publication of Nineteen Eighty-Four, the term "Big Brother" has entered the lexicon as a synonym for abuse of government power, particularly in respect to civil liberties, often specifically related to mass surveillance. Additional speculation from Douglas Kellner of UCLA argued that Big Brother represents Joseph Stalin and that the novel portrayed life under totalitarianism.[1][2] In the novel, it is never made clear whether Big Brother was a real person or an invention by the Party to personify itself. In Party propaganda, Big Brother is presented as one of the founders of the Party, along with Goldstein.

V for Vendetta Publication history[edit] When the publishers cancelled Warrior in 1985 (with two completed issues unpublished due to the cancellation), several companies attempted to convince Moore and Lloyd to let them publish and complete the story. In 1988, DC Comics published a ten-issue series that reprinted the Warrior stories in colour, then continued the series to completion. List of democratic socialist parties and organizations - Wikipedia From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia This is a list of parties and organizations that are either explicitly democratic socialist or include significant numbers of democratic socialist members (although many do not specifically include the term "Democratic Socialist" in their name). List[edit]

Animal Farm Themes Animal Farm is a satire of totalitarian governments in their many guises. But Orwell composed the book for a more specific purpose: to serve as a cautionary tale about Stalinism. It was for this reason that he faced such difficulty in getting the book published; by the time Animal Farm was ready to meet its readers, the Allies were cooperating with the Soviet Union. The allegorical characters of the novel represent specific historical figures and different factions of Imperial Russian and Soviet society. Michael Lewis Early life[edit] Lewis was born in New Orleans, to corporate lawyer J. Thomas Lewis and community activist Diana Monroe Lewis. He attended the college preparatory Isidore Newman School in New Orleans. He then attended Princeton University where he received a BA degree (cum laude)[1] in Art History in 1982 and was a member of the Ivy Club. He went on to work with New York art dealer Daniel Wildenstein.

Bryan Lee O'Malley Bryan Lee O'Malley (born 21 February 1979)[1] is a Canadian cartoonist, best known for the Scott Pilgrim series. He is also a musician using the alias Kupek. Career[edit] Bryan Lee O'Malley started in Film Studies at the University of Western Ontario, but dropped out before completing.[1] Prior to having his own material published, O'Malley illustrated the Oni Press miniseries Hopeless Savages: Ground Zero, written by Jen Van Meter. He also lettered many Oni comics, including the majority of Chynna Clugston's output between 2002 and 2005.

Why Socialism? - Wikipedia "Why Socialism?"[1] is an article written by Albert Einstein in May 1949 that appeared in the first issue of the socialist journal Monthly Review.[2] Contents[edit] According to Einstein, the profit motive of a capitalist society, in conjunction with competition among capitalists, leads to unnecessary cycles of booms and depressions, and ultimately encourages selfishness instead of cooperation.[3] In addition, the educational system of such a society would be severely undermined because people will educate themselves only to advance their careers. What is the main theme in Animal Farm by George Orwell? The weakness of all Utopias is this, that they take the greatest difficulty of man and assume it to be overcome, and then give an elaborate account of the overcoming of the smaller ones. C. K. Chesterton, Heretics I think the above quote states pretty accurately what Orwell had in mind. Changing institutions does not change human nature, which is "the greatest difficulty of man."

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