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Super Easy Survival Bread : BeSurvival.com

Super Easy Survival Bread : BeSurvival.com
Like all things survival you need to LIVE IT day to day, not just stick it in a closet and hope you never have to use it! If you’re storing wheat and all hell breaks loose….what do you do? Bake bread of course! But do you know how? If you are new to baking your own bread it can seem like a daunting task but it really isn’t. You don’t need yeast, sugar, baking soda, or really anything but flour and water. Super Easy Survival Bread (SESB) 1 cup of fine whole wheat flour (buy from store or grind your own) 2 tbsp. of olive oil (optional, also regular vegetable oil works too) 1 tsp. salt (optional, add more or less to taste) 1/2 cup of water Mix all the ingredients in a bowl and scoop it togther into a ball. Powers out? This will serve about 3-4 people if eaten as a side with a meal, or make about 2 sandwiches. Nutritional info without olive oil Nutritional info with olive oil Recommended Posts: How to Save Money While Buying your Survival, Prepping, and Homestead Gear Related:  Survival/Homesteading

Top 40 Blogs for Survivalists » Homeland Security Degree By admin on The Internet has given survivalists a chance to interact and share tips on a self-sustainable lifestyle. Whether you’re stockpiling canned food for a natural disaster or going all the way and attempting to live off the grid, these blogs will give you tips on self-defense, skinning animals, navigating a route and coming out alive after a long duration of time away from standard civilizations. Top Survivalist Blogs These blogs show you how to become a survivalist and also discuss ideas on how to handle questions or inquiries from family or loved ones who see the survivalist lifestyle as extreme. The Suvivalist Tribe At this messageboard you’ll find tips on keeping in shape during the winter months and whether stockpiling guns is true to survivalist form. Self-Sustainable Blogs Most survivalists look to be self-sustainable in everything they need to survive. Survivalist and Self-Sustainable Forums

Living Off the Land: 52 Highly Nutritious Wild-Growing Plants digg HJ: Organic is awesome, but there is nothing quite like wild growing foods. Quite simply, foods that grow wild have the absolute highest life force energy and nutritional and medicinal benefits available. Despite major advances in growing methods in the last few hundred years, humans still cannot replicate the wisdom of Mother nature exactly. Either way, learning to be able to identify these plants connects us to that primal, natural essence that we all contain, no matter how disconnected from it we may be. - Truth 52 Wild Plants That Can Also Be Eaten Suntactics We all know which vegetables and fruits are safe to eat, but what about other wild edibles? Blackberries: Many wild berries are not safe to eat, it’s best to stay away from them. Dandelions: The easiest to recognize if the dandelion, in the spring they show their bright yellow buds. Asparagus: Elderberries: Gooseberries: Mulberries: Mulberry leaves have two types, one spade shape and a 5 fingered leaf. Pine: Kudzu: Daylily: Peacans:

Snares And Traps Disclaimer: Traps are presented for information purposes only, they are dangerous, some lethally so. Using them is also illegal in all likelihood. Don't use them except in a survival situation. SPRING SNARE: Game running through the snare disengages the trigger bar,and the prey is flung off the ground. Use on game trails or in gaps through rocks or hedges. Cut a notch in triggerbar (a) to fit upright (b). BAITED SNARE: Construct as for spring snare but using the release mechanism shown. LEG SNARE : Push a natural fork or two sticks tied together into the ground. PLATFORM TRAP: Site over a small depression on the game trail. FIGURE 4 DEADFALL : A simple and effective deadfall trap, can be made to any size. TRIPWIRE DEADFALL : A heavy log is suspended over a busy game trail, trips the wire and pulls a retaining bar from under two short pegs secured in a tree trunk. BAITED HOLE NOOSE : This trap is very useful for scavengers, drive 4 sharpened sticks into the pit, through the edges.

Tasty Backpacking Recipes Backpacking Recipes for Supper Dining out tonight? Follow Chef Glenn's backpacking recipes to create healthy, hearty, homemade meals for the trail. How to Make Backpacking Meals: Cook a big pot of chili or stew, dehydrate and divide into individual servings.Dehydrate vegetables, meat and beans separately and assemble into meals.Enhance store-bought boxed meals with additional dried meat and vegetables.Create saucy backpacking meals by blending and dehydrating starchy foods like potatoes and beans into bark.Dehydrate tomato sauce for Italian style meals. All of the backpacking recipes linked below are for a single serving. Increase the ingredients proportionally by 1.5 or 2 times if you have a large appetite or you are cooking for two in the same pot. Chili & Stews Beef & Bean Chili Cook a big batch, dehydrate, and divide into meal size portions. Root Bark Stew Heat and eat for supper or munch out of the bag while hiking. Ratatouille Assembled Backpacking Meals Macaroni and Cheese Recipes Lasagna

s Basic Recipes - Biscuits and No-Yeast Breads - by Robert Wayne Atkins, P.E. Copyright © 1976,2007 by Robert Wayne Atkins, P.E. All Rights Reserved. Yeast causes the bread to rise and become light. Eggs add protein, color, and bulk to the bread. The following recipes don't require yeast or eggs. Pancakes (No Eggs) Mix all ingredients together well, and then fry the pancakes on medium heat in a skillet, turning once. Flour Tortillas (14 six-inch Tortillas) Preparation: Sift flour and salt together. Salt-Rising Bread (Recipe One) Preparation: Bring milk almost to a boil. Salt-Rising Bread (Recipe Two) Preparation: Bring milk almost to a boil. Irish Soda Bread Substitution: 2 tsp. baking powder can be used to replace both the baking soda and the cream of tartar.Preparation: Mix flour, baking soda, tartar, and salt in a bowl. Choctaw Indian Fry Bread (Requires no sugar) (14 Pieces) or Navaho Indian Fry Bread (Add 1 tsp. Preparation: Sift flour, salt, and baking powder into a bowl (with the optional sugar). Baking Powder Biscuits Camp Biscuits or Biscuit Twists

Foxhole radio - ZombieSquadWiki From ZombieSquadWiki Work in Progress The traditional foxhole radio is made out of scavenged parts by some soldiers during World War II. This page documents that radio as well as improvements to help it work better. The construction of the radio is not very difficult and most people age 6 and up should be able to make one. Basic Radio The basic radio is simply a diode, crystal earpiece (piezo electric), and an antenna. The antenna is the top left triangle looking thing. The coil is the spring looking thing Ground is the right triangle The headphones are the ear muff looking things The diode is the triangle with the line on the left side Making the coil Items required About 50 feet of wire bottle or other non-conducting form about 6 inches in length and about 2 inches in diameter pen, nail, stick to make taps Where to scavenge parts from Wire You can use any wire, it must have a non-conductive insulation. Bottle This can be any empty shampoo bottle, contact lens cleaner bottle, or even pvc pipe.

FREE FOOD - Free Living 101 (SD).mp4 6 Widerness Survival Shelters During most outdoor survival situations, shelter is going to be one of your top concerns. In fact, when it comes to common ways that people die during a wilderness emergency, hypothermia, a drop in core body temperature, and hyperthermia, an increase in the body’s temperature, are right at the top of the list. That’s why knowing how to construct a wilderness shelter is such an important skill for anyone who spends any amount of time in the great outdoors. Here are some actual real-world Survival Shelters; these shelters should give you a good idea of what’s possible and can give you a good starting point to go out there and practice. A-Frame Shelters One of the most common, and easy to build types of shelters is the traditional A-Frame. Here is a great example of an easy Aframe shelter, covered with leaves and debris for added insulation and waterproofing. Swamp Bed Under a Lean To Here’s a quick and easy swamp bed that can help get you up off the ground in cold, wet, or damp environments.

Bannock Bannock has been a staple food of wilderness explorers, prospectors, soldiers, and trappers for centuries. Portable, nutritious, tasty and easy to make while surviving in the outdoors, bannocks legendary reputation continues as one of the best survival foods you can bring into the wilderness. Bannock is high in carbohydrates and complements the proteins of pemmican, jerky, the arctic survival ration, and other meats. What is Bannock? Bannock is a bread that you can cook using little more than a fire and a stick though it can also be baked or fried. Bannocks origins are lost in the mists of time, but some believe bannock was first made by the Scotts from the same oat flour that gave their horses great strength and endurance. The most simple bannock recipe consists of just flour of nearly any kind and water. There are a great many other bannock recipies that will make your mouth water and give you the impetus to try your hand at making your own. Survival Topics Bannock on a Green Stick

Survival Food – 56 food supplies from the store When disaster strikes, there’s a pretty good chance your local grocery stores are going to be stripped bare in a matter of hours. From panicked people trying to stock up on last minute supplies, to those who failed to prepare for even short-term disasters and now find themselves facing the prospect of starving, your local grocery store is going to look like a battleground in a post-apocalyptic movie. Most grocery stores have a maximum 3 day supply of goods on hand before they run dry. That means even short-term disasters like hurricanes, floods and earthquakes can cause supply chain problems that will quickly wipe out their inventory. To be prepared to face an emergency situation where food supplies are blocked, you need to invest in a long-term food supply. With the help of suggestions that have come in from our readers, we have compiled a list of the top food items and emergency supplies that you can buy at the grocery store. Survival Food that adds flavor & comfort: Oils: Resources:

Basic Survival Tips Author: Jeff Durham - Updated: 22 April 2014| Comment If you regularly spend time in the woods, wilderness, mountains, on water or in any other places in which you may be faced with emergencies and may have to rely on your ability for survival, it's important to know what to do and what your priorities should be. In fact, it's useful to enrol on even the most basic of survival courses as they will help you become more prepared should you find yourself in a real 'life or death' survival situation. Knowing your priorities is one thing but that will all count for nothing unless you're mentally prepared too. It's important to remain calm, think rationally and sometimes, be creative when it comes to survival in an emergency. A Shelter For Survival A shelter is crucial on a number of levels. Fire Once you have built your shelter, the next thing to do is to light a fire. Water And Survival Water is your next survival priority. First Aid Administration Food And Survival Navigation and Rescue Title:

Mother of all mushrooms discovered in China China's Yunnan province is known as the "Kingdom of Mushrooms" for its rich diversity of more than 600 species of edible fungi. But even the hungriest of mushroom fans might find this monster mushroom, recently discovered in Yunnan, a little hard to swallow. Fungi, including mushrooms, are neither plants nor animals and instead form their own group of living organisms that generally reproduce by spores and contain nuclei with chromosomes. Perhaps surprisingly due to their plantlike appearance, fungi are more closely related to animals than to plants. China's mushroom industry is a multimillion-dollar operation, with sales equivalent to $44 million in 2005, according to The Diplomat. The giant mushroom discovered in China might not be safe to eat; many mushrooms are poisonous. On the other hand, there may be some therapeutic benefits to certain mushrooms. Related on LiveScience and MNN: This story was originally written for LiveScience and was republished with permission here.

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