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Anticipédia

Anticipédia

http://www.anticipedia.info/

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Futurology Moore's law is an example of futures studies; it is a statistical collection of past and present trends with the goal of accurately extrapolating future trends. Futures studies (also called futurology and futurism) is the study of postulating possible, probable, and preferable futures and the worldviews and myths that underlie them. There is a debate as to whether this discipline is an art or science. In general, it can be considered as a branch of the social sciences and parallel to the field of history.

Gamification: Finally In Demo Mode? There certainly has been no shortage of attention being given to the topic of gamification in MR lately, but I think we’re about to move from just talking about it to actually doing something to make it a reality. Our content partners at ResearchAccess are doing a series of posts on the topic and I think they are leading up to something very interesting. Frequent contributor Romi Mahajan kicked things off with a post on why he thinks Gameization is Game-Changing: What is a game? In her riveting book “Reality is Broken,” Jane McGonigal outlines 4 defining characteristics of games in general; a game has:1.

Accelerating Future There isn’t enough in the world. Not enough wealth to go around, not enough space in cities, not enough medicine, not enough intelligence or wisdom. Not enough genuine fun or excitement. Not enough knowledge. Not enough solutions to global problems. SXSW 2011: The internet is over If my grandchildren ever ask me where I was when I realised the internet was over – they won't, of course, because they'll be too busy playing with the teleportation console – I'll be able to be quite specific: I was in a Mexican restaurant opposite a cemetery in Austin, Texas, halfway through eating a taco. It was the end of day two of South by Southwest Interactive, the world's highest-profile gathering of geeks and the venture capitalists who love them, and I'd been pursuing a policy of asking those I met, perhaps a little too aggressively, what it was exactly that they did. What is "user experience", really?

Methods of prospective > Softwares > Prospective softwares and toolbox : La prospective Six Problems, Six Tools Although strategic foresight is an intellectual “non-discipline” it nevertheless requires rigor and formalization, which clarify action and lead towards desired futures. The toolbox allows the strategist to ask the right questions and reduce incoherencies and uncertainties. Strategic foresight is an art that requires talents like intuition, unconventional thinking, and common sense. STRATEGIC FORESIGHT METHODS allows one: Rethinking the ESP Game Rethinking the ESP Game Stephen Robertson, Milan Vojnović, and Ingmar Weber September 2009 The ESP Game (Ahn and Dabbish 2004) was designed to harvest human intelligence to assign labels to images - a task which is still difficult for even the most advanced systems in image processing. However, the ESP Game as it is currently implemented encourages players to assign "obvious" labels, which are most likely to lead to an agreement with the partner. But these labels can often be deduced from the labels already present using an appropriate language model and such labels therefore add only little information to the system.

What is Open Foresight We recently introduced the concept of ‘Open Foresight’ as a process we’re developing to analyze complex issues in an open and collaborative way, and to raise the bar on public discourse and forward-focused critical thinking. It’s a work in progress and constantly evolving, but here are some of the basic principles we’ve developed so far.1) What is Open Foresight? In simple terms, open foresight is a process for building visions of the future together. 2) The Big Picture Context If you look around, it’s undeniable that there’s a new global narrative emerging in the way we fundamentally understand ourselves as humanity – how we do business, how we learn, how we generate value together, how we interact. This transformation is being driven both by new communication technologies, and by the emergent behaviors these tools enable.

Human-based computation Human-based computation (HBC) is a computer science technique in which a machine performs its function by outsourcing certain steps to humans. This approach uses differences in abilities and alternative costs between humans and computer agents to achieve symbiotic human-computer interaction. In traditional computation, a human employs a computer[1] to solve a problem; a human provides a formalized problem description and an algorithm to a computer, and receives a solution to interpret. Human-based computation frequently reverses the roles; the computer asks a person or a large group of people to solve a problem, then collects, interprets, and integrates their solutions. Early work[edit]

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