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Contour Crafting: Automated Construction: Behrokh Khoshnevis at TEDxOjai

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=JdbJP8Gxqog

Related:  3D Printing (old)

The Entire Country of Bahrain has Been 3D Printed in a Huge 1:10,000-scale Model 3D Printed Cerbarco Building When it comes to 3D printing, we are used to seeing the technology used on a small scale. It isn’t too often that we see it utilized in creating anything much larger than a basketball. Metro Makeovers for the Abandoned Stations of Paris Anyone who wants to make a swimming pool out of an abandoned metro station neglected for 75 years, has definitely got my attention. The ghosts of the Parisian underground could soon be resurrected if city voters play their cards right in the upcoming mayoral elections. Promising candidate, Nathalie Koziuscot-Morizet, who would become the first female to ever hold the post in the capital, has released the first sketches of her plans to reclaim the city of light’s abandoned stations. (Update: Nathalie Koziuscot-Morizet did not win the election, but this is still pretty cool anyway). Up on the candidate’s drawing board we have several proposals to revive the stations from their solitude, including my personal favourite, the swimming pool (just imagine doing laps down an old subway track), a theatre (think of the acoustics), a restaurant, an art gallery and a nightclub.

Our Invisible Revolution Republished from truthdig.com By Chris Hedges “Did you ever ask yourself how it happens that government and capitalism continue to exist in spite of all the evil and trouble they are causing in the world?” the anarchist Alexander Berkman wrote in his essay “The Idea Is the Thing.” Tech: Free Software Released to 3D Print Objects Larger Than Printer’s Build Volume Over the past several months we have seen many extremely large 3D printers come to market. This stems from the desire to print objects larger than what typical FDM 3D printers can handle. After all, what fun is a 3D printer when you are limited to printing only smaller objects? Neri Oxman who plans to ‘3D print’ buildings wins Vilcek Prize Feb.1, 2014 Neri Oxman, a designer, architect, artist and head of the MIT Media Lab's Mediated Matter research group has been named the 2014 recipient of the Vilcek Prize in Design. Oxman resides in Boston, where she is the Sony Corporation Career Development professor and assistant professor of Media Arts and Sciences at the MIT Media Lab. She is the founder and director of the Mediated Matter design research group. Neri Oxman was raised in Israel and relocated to the United States in 2005.

How Do We Act in the Face of Climate Chaos? The Warning As described by the United Nations Advisory Group on Greenhouse Gases in 1990, temperature rise “beyond 1 degree C may elicit rapid, unpredictable and non-linear responses that could lead to extensive ecosystem damage”. We’ve clearly triggered the types of positive feedbacks the United Nations warned about in 1990. Yet my colleagues and acquaintances think we can and will work our way out of this horrific mess with permaculture (which is not to denigrate permaculture, the principles of which are implemented at the mud hut). Reforestation doesn’t come close to overcoming combustion of fossil fuels, as pointed out in the 30 May 2013 issue of Nature Climate Change.

King Richard III’s Entire 3D Printed Skeleton Unveiled For Museum Opening The ability of 3D printers to make near exact replicas of objects have led to a variety of amazing applications, especially for the use within museum exhibits. Over the last several months, we have covered numerous stories detailing how museums worldwide are utilizing 3D printing technology to make copies of their most valuable pieces. By doing so they are able to oftentimes provide museum attendees the option to interact with the replicas in a whole new way, allowing them to actually touch the objects in some cases.

The incredible hulks: Jonathan Meades' A-Z of brutalism Asplund The term nybrutalism, new brutalism, was the jocular coinage of architect Hans Asplund. He applied it to a small house in Uppsala, in his native Sweden, designed in 1949 by his contemporaries Bengt Edman and Lennart Holm and built of bricks. Were it not for that material, the house might stand as the very example of the light, ascetic, prim, nordic modernism that afflicted Britain for some years after the war.

Here is my interview to Enrico Dini about his and Koshnevis' work: (content in italian). Here is its Google Translate version: by cloudscene Jan 13

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