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How to make a tool set

How to make a tool set
Life without tools is barbaric. But even simple tools can be expensive in rural parts of developing countries. Import duties bump the costs up higher than they are in the States or elsewhere, and sometimes only low-quality brands are available anyway. So, to hold off future barbarians, we'd like to show how to build a simple tool set on a very low budget. Larry Bentley, the man who figured out how to make these tools, said a wise thing: "Without tools, kids don't take stuff apart, and without taking stuff apart, you don't learn how things work." These tools, Bentley says, could be in the hands of the next William Kamkambwa,who made a working wind power generator from backyard scraps in a village in Malawi. Here's Larry's quick guide to DIY tools. The tools in this guide: Saw Pliers Wooden vice Wood drill bit / star drill bit Chisel Strap hinge vice Related:  Off Off The Grid

Build a Touchless 3D Tracking Interface with Everyday Materials Combine low-tech materials with some high-tech components and build a completely Touchless 3D Tracking Interface. Explore capacitive sensing by using several panels of cardboard lined with aluminum foil. These panels, when charged, create electric fields that correspond to X, Y, and Z axes to create a 3D cube. For Weekend Projects makers looking for an introduction to Arduino, this is a great project to learn from. Once your touchless 3D tracker is up and running, what you do with it is only limited by your own imagination! Make an RGB or HSB color pickerControl video or music parameters; sequence a beat or melodyLarge, slightly bent surface with multiple plates + a projector = “Minority Report” interface Sign up below for the Weekend Projects Newsletter to receive the projects before anybody else does, get tips, see other makers’ builds, and more. More: See all of the Weekend Projects posts Related

Compass Alternatives Compass Instructions and Alternatives ( or How to Find Your Way With or Without a Compass ) Copyright © 1999,2004 by Robert Wayne Atkins, P.E. All Rights Reserved. Click Here for a Microsoft WORD printer friendly copy of this article. A good compass has been a valuable asset to explorers, travelers, and hunters for many centuries. Let's begin be examining the primary function of a compass. On some compasses the letters are on a dial on the outside border of the compass. In the picture of the black compass below, the N, E, S, and W are printed on a floating dial inside the compass. Regardless of which type of compass you have, the relative position of N, E, S, and W in relation to one another is always the same. Many camping supply stores, including WalMart, sometimes carry a small compass that is part of a multi-function unit that usually includes a miniature thermometer and a whistle (and sometimes a folding magnifying glass). The Sun The sun rises in the east and sets in the west.

How to make Char Cord / Char Rope Homemade Lamps from Everyday Objects Having the ability to create light without needing electricity should be part of everyone’s emergency essentials. While flashlights are certainly helpful, batteries quickly die out so having a store of candles on hand can provide the light and morale boost that one needs to make it through a dark night or two. But what if you didn’t have any candles available? Fortunately there are very simple ways to make homemade lamps from everyday objects found around the house. How a Lamp Works Both oil lamps and candles are able to continually burn their fuel (wax or oil) through a process called capillary action. Understanding this is the key to creating many different types of wicks for your homemade lamps. Making a Tuna Fish Can Oil Lamp Here’s a simple example of how to make your own oil lamp using a tuna fish can. Tuna CanVegetable Oil, Olive Oil or any other cooking oilOld Cotton T-Shirt, Rag, or SockNail (or something sharp to poke a hole through the top of the tuna can) Light the wick.

How to Make Char-Twine How To Heat Up Your Room Using Just a Candle: This heater is a multi-core steel and ceramic radiator assembly, suspended above the candle on a solid steel stand. The radiator absorbs and concentrates the thermal energy of the candle and converts it into dry radiant space heat. If you burn candles, now you can add their heat to your home or office. There is also an “electric candle” option that uses a 60 watt quartz halogen lamp; that works out to about 6 cents for 10 hours of “burn” time. “Steel has the ability to approach the temperature of its heat source,” says the inventor, “so the solid steel inner core will go as high as 550° Fahrenheit. That high inner temperature is mitigated to a very warm 160° to 180° on the outer surface. The simple elegant design has no moving parts. What’s new for 2008 is an “electric candle” option that takes advantage of the fact that 90% of the energy that goes into an incandescent lamp is “wasted” as heat. The electric candle is pictured below:

DIY Polygraph Machine: Detect Lies with Tin Foil, Wire and Arduino DIY Polygraph Machine: Detect Lies with Tin Foil, Wire and Arduino Lying is awesome. From a very young age, children learn that flat out denying the truth gets you out of trouble and helps keep you calm in the face of horror. But what happens when you just have to know if someone, say, used your toothbrush? You could ask them to take an expensive and arduous polygraph test. If you're industrious and don't have the dough for a legit polygraph, you can make your very own galvanic skin response (GSR) device. Today, we will make a cheap GSR device and learn if our toothbrush is really safe after all. Materials ArduinoAluminum foilVelcroWire10k resistorBreadboard Step 1 Make the Electrodes GSR machines require an even and consistent connection to the skin in order to function properly. Begin by taping the exposed end of a wires to a sheet of foil. Adhere a strip of Velcro over the tape and cut off the extra foil. Last, add a single piece of Velcro at the end of the foil side. Step 3 Load the Code

Hobo Stove Urban survival is a tricky subject to discuss. There are advantages to urban survival. Anywhere you look there are items in trash cans and dumpsters that can be used to improve a survival situation. Cardboard boxes can be used for shelter, newspapers can be used for insulation and to the practical survivor another persons trash can be a treasure. In this case we will use a coffee can to build a stove. Whether you call it a hobo stove, can stove, or just a survival stove, this is a cheap effective way to both cook and stay warm. Keep an open mind during any survival situation. Whether backpacking, camping, or surviving, having a way to cook can make a huge difference. A coffee can or large vegetable/ravioli can will allow you to build a stove and cook. Items used to build this stove: * Coffee can * Can opener * Tin snips * Drill and drill bits * Metal coat hanger There are many methods that could be used to build this stove. The top side of a coffee can is already opened. Materials:

DIY Urban Sensor Kit Desarrollado en conjunto con el Instituto de Arquitectura Avanzada de Catalunya y Hangar, el DIY Urban Sensor Kit permite obtener los datos medioambientales de temperatura, sonido, luz, co2 y humedad en tiempo real y subirlos a Pachube. El kit fue utilizado por los estudiantes del Master en Arquitectura Avanzada durante el Studio I “Many Slow Cities into a Smart City”. Par ver los resultados del Studio mira este video.

Building a DIY microscope This is a story of what happens when a foolish scientist screws stuff up. It’s the story of a DIY microscope, and how it all went terribly wrong. I tried. I really did. I read the instructions through five times. Last week I came across the instructions to make a do-it-yourself microscope. I went out and got all the parts I would need. Here’s the idea for the microscope, invented by Kenji Yoshino, a Science Learning Center post-baccalaureate fellow at Grinnell College. Figure 2. But mine came out looking very different indeed. We started by trying to drill the wood and the Plexiglas to fit the screws in and make a base and a stage for the microscope. Bad choice. But even if you use masking tape or heat, you have to start with a very small drill bit, and then use larger and larger bits until you get a hole that is the right size. Despite the cracks, in the end we got the holes! And here’s where I made a BIG mistake. So I put the lens in the smaller piece. Finally, we put in the light.

Top 10 Things You Can Upgrade with a Little Electronics Hacking it is a skill to do a good solder joint, it comes with LOTS of practice. so most people who rarely do it will ever get good at it. Bingo. Of course, part of the issue is having a soldering iron at the right temp with a properly tinned tip. Newbies aren't using soldering stations but a cheap iron they got at rat shack (You have questions? We have deer-in-the-headlights... erm... answers!). I don't expect to ever master tricky stuff like smts or even multilayer pcbs so I'm not much better then a newbie, anyway - and I totally suck at sweating pipe joints. Ah, well... SMT is actually a bit better than through-hole once you get the hang of it.

Flower Pot Refrigerator Have you ever wondered what our ancestors did without refrigeration? How were they able to prevent their food from spoiling? Some of our ancient civilizations did in fact have refrigeration and used simple items they had on hand to create it. The zeer, or clay pot refrigeration keeps food cool (icy cold) without electricity by using evaporative cooling. In a short or long-term disaster where power is out, knowing essential skills on how to prevent foods from spoiling will help you survive longer and stay healthier. All that is needed to create a clay pot refrigerator is two terra cotta pots, one larger than the other, as well as some sand, water, and cloth. Rather than re-inventing the wheel, perhaps we could learn a thing or two from our ancient ancestors. This information has been made available by Ready Nutrition Google+ share this article with others related reading featured today Leave A Comment...

Top 10 DIY Tech Gifts @keyboard-vomit: Yeah, but wouldn't it be awesome if some of our not so tech friends actually attempted (and accomplished) one or more of these feats? I mean, when "it's the thought that counts," shouldn't it be a thought about something we'd actually appreciate. Then again, maybe socks are your thing. ;) @HunterShoptaw: That they are, I'm wanting some socks with an integrated HDD, and some USB connectivity. @HunterShoptaw: The thought does count, but it sure would be nice if they enjoyed the gift too. So for this year, I created wishgenies dot com for people who WANT to give good gifts, but don't know what they'll want. @keyboard-vomit: I swear that some day, some how...Google will be able to find my lost socks.

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