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» The No. 1 Habit of Highly Creative People

» The No. 1 Habit of Highly Creative People
“In order to be open to creativity, one must have the capacity for contructive use of solitude. One must overcome the fear of being alone.” ~Rollo May Post written by Leo Babauta. Creativity is a nebulous, murky topic that fascinates me endlessly — how does it work? What habits to creative people do that makes them so successful at creativity? I’ve reflected on my own creative habits, but decided I’d look at the habits that others consider important to their creativity. This was going to be a list of their creative habits … but in reviewing their lists, and my own habits, I found one that stood out. It’s the Most Important Habit when it comes to creativity. After you read the No. 1 habit, please scroll down and read the No. 2 habit — they might seem contradictory but in my experience, you can’t really hit your creative stride until you find a way to balance both habits. The No. 1 Creativity Habit In a word: solitude. Creativity flourishes in solitude. What habit helps his creativity?

http://zenhabits.net/creative-habit/

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10 Things for Conscious People to Focus on in 2013 Dylan Charles, ContributorActivist Post The long anticipated and prophesied year, 2012, has come and gone; yet, the problems and challenges facing mankind and planet earth remain. Those who have put stock in the idea of conscious evolution are now faced with the burden of proof: is there any legitimacy to this idea of a ‘shift?’ Some human experiences prove too extraordinary and too far outside of the purview of science and intellect to effectively put into words. Joy is like a one night stand. I'd love for you to join the tribe of Wishcasters. Every Wednesday we flock to our blogs, we answer a question, and then we all visit each other and leave a comment like "As you wish for yourself, so I wish for you as well." It's a great way to connect, to share, and to bring our wishes one step closer to manifesting.

DIY: Wearable words When I was looking around for tutorials on making paper beads, I found some really striking "book beads" and accessories, now collected in this post. I understand (after all the browsing) that you can make really durable "beads" easily ... very little time, skill or money required. Woohoo! Eric Mazur on new interactive teaching techniques In 1990, after seven years of teaching at Harvard, Eric Mazur, now Balkanski professor of physics and applied physics, was delivering clear, polished lectures and demonstrations and getting high student evaluations for his introductory Physics 11 course, populated mainly by premed and engineering students who were successfully solving complicated problems. Then he discovered that his success as a teacher “was a complete illusion, a house of cards.” The epiphany came via an article in the American Journal of Physics by Arizona State professor David Hestenes. He had devised a very simple test, couched in everyday language, to check students’ understanding of one of the most fundamental concepts of physics—force—and had administered it to thousands of undergraduates in the southwestern United States. Mazur tried the test on his own students.

How the Brain Stops Time One of the strangest side-effects of intense fear is time dilation, the apparent slowing-down of time. It's a common trope in movies and TV shows, like the memorable scene from The Matrix in which time slows down so dramatically that bullets fired at the hero seem to move at a walking pace. In real life, our perceptions aren't keyed up quite that dramatically, but survivors of life-and-death situations often report that things seem to take longer to happen, objects fall more slowly, and they're capable of complex thoughts in what would normally be the blink of an eye. Now a research team from Israel reports that not only does time slow down, but that it slows down more for some than for others. Anxious people, they found, experience greater time dilation in response to the same threat stimuli. An intriguing result, and one that raises a more fundamental question: how, exactly, does the brain carry out this remarkable feat?

The Joyful Heartbeat Checklist : Janet Goldstein Writing, growing our businesses, making a difference can all seem more and more overwhelming and elusive in the noisy, hyper-speedy, competitive, and very public world we live and work in. The worry, confusion, and sheer pushing we do can make us forget that at the heart of our work is our creative spirit. Yet what happens when we forget (knock, knock) that we ourselves are the joyful, creative heartbeat at the center of our our ideas, our projects, and our relationships? How do we tap into, and really listen to, that joyful heartbeat? How can this joyful beat give us clarity and a lighter, happier step for even the hardest things we’re trying to do?

25 Ways Of How To Use Pallets In Your Garden Benches, flower pots, tables, small vertical gardens and even canopies covered with plants. All of them can decorate your garden immediately if you know how to make a simple pallet work. After we’ve shown you how to recycle wooden pallets, we thought it would be a great idea to see a bunch of decorative ideas that can beautify your garden. Web Sound - Rare Audio from Anthology Film Archives Rare Audio from Anthology Film Archives P. Adams Sitney Interviews Kenneth Anger on WNYC's "Arts Forum" (1972) Scholar and Anthology Film Archives co-founder P. Adams Sitney interviews Kenneth Anger for Arts Forum, WNYC. They discuss the recent publication of Anger's book, HOLLYWOOD BABYLON, Anger's years in Paris during the 1950's, his film SCORPIO RISING, the in-progress work LUCIFER RISING and the importance of film preservation.

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