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New Age

The New Age movement is a Western spiritual movement that developed in the second half of the 20th century. Its central precepts have been described as "drawing on both Eastern and Western spiritual and metaphysical traditions and infusing them with influences from self-help and motivational psychology, holistic health, parapsychology, consciousness research and quantum physics".[2] The term New Age refers to the coming astrological Age of Aquarius.[1] The movement aims to create "a spirituality without borders or confining dogmas" that is inclusive and pluralistic.[3] It holds to "a holistic worldview",[4] emphasising that the Mind, Body, and Spirit are interrelated[1] and that there is a form of monism and unity throughout the universe.[5] It attempts to create "a worldview that includes both science and spirituality"[6] and embraces a number of forms of mainstream science as well as other forms of science that are considered fringe. History[edit] Origins[edit] Development[edit]

Marilyn Ferguson Marilyn Ferguson, circa 1980. Marilyn Ferguson (April 5, 1938 in Grand Junction, Colorado – October 19, 2008) was an American author, editor and public speaker, best known for her 1980 book The Aquarian Conspiracy and its affiliation with the New Age Movement in popular culture. A founding member of the Association of Humanistic Psychology,[citation needed] Ferguson published and edited the well-regarded science newsletter Brain/Mind Bulletin from 1975 to 1996. She eventually earned numerous honorary degrees, served on the board of directors of the Institute of Noetic Sciences, and befriended such diverse figures of influence as inventor and theorist Buckminster Fuller, spiritual author Ram Dass, Nobel Prize-winning chemist Ilya Prigogine and billionaire Ted Turner. Ferguson's work also influenced Vice President Al Gore, who participated in her informal network while a senator and later met with her in the White House. Youth and early writing career[edit] The Aquarian Conspiracy[edit]

130 Positive Personality Adjectives For Your Next Job Interview Last week, I asked you if you could describe yourself in one word. In anticipation of that personality-testing job interview question, here’s some adjective help that will also make you happier. When Scott Adams asked his readers to look at themselves, he made an interesting discovery with the results. Other useful resources in this series Subscribe to JobMob via RSS or email and follow me on Twitter for more happiness-increasing job search advice. --Jacob Share The Job Tips Newsletter Will Teach You How To Find A Job NOW Discover how your resume can attract more interviewsSupercharge your interview skills to get more job offersDownload the Ultimate Twitter Job Search Guide FREEBest of all - the newsletter is also FREEJoin now! How To Share This Article With Your Readers Simply copy and paste the code below into your website (Ctrl+C to copy)It will look like this: 130 Positive Personality Adjectives For Your Next Job Interview

Simply Satisfied, Part 1 by Renee Miller - explorefaith Simply Satisfied A series of articles on developing a life of simplicity by The Rev. Canon Renée Miller Installment 1 Slipping into Simplicity "All I'm asking you to do is to set a mock 'fire' for me," I said to my friend. "What are you talking about?" she replied. "Well, if my house really caught on fire, I would not be able to choose what to let go of and what to keep. With a healthy mixture of compassion and hesitancy, my friend did as I asked, and when I returned, I could see that most of what I had owned before the weekend was gone. " That's my L.L. "Oh, yes," he replied. This mock 'fire' was a startling way for me to slip into simplicity, and it was a powerful prescription for helping me to begin to exercise a kind of detachment from my personal possessions. When we first begin to think about simplicity, we leap headlong into the pool of possessions. One might well ask, "Well, if it is so difficult, why begin at all?" Second, those who live simply live on the edge of miracle.

Findhorn Ecovillage Findhorn Ecovillage is an experimental architectural community project based at The Park, in Moray, Scotland, near the village of Findhorn.[1] The project's main aim is to demonstrate a sustainable development in environmental, social, and economic terms. Work began in the early 1980s under the auspices of the Findhorn Foundation but now includes a wide diversity of organisations and activities.[2][3] Numerous different ecological techniques are in use, and the project has won a variety of awards, including the UN-Habitat Best Practice Designation in 1998.[4] A recent independent study[5] concludes that the residents have the lowest ecological footprint of any community measured so far in the industrialised world and is also half of the UK average.[6] Although the project has attracted some controversy, the growing profile of environmental issues such as climate change has led to a degree of mainstream acceptance of its ecological ethos.[7][8][9] Beginnings[edit] Eco-architecture[edit]

History of the hippie movement The hippie subculture began its development as a youth movement in the United States during the early 1960s and then developed around the world. Its origins may be traced to European social movements in the 19th and early 20th century such as Bohemians, and the influence of Eastern religion and spirituality. From around 1967, its fundamental ethos — including harmony with nature, communal living, artistic experimentation particularly in music, and the widespread use of recreational drugs — spread around the world. Precursors[edit] Classical culture[edit] 19th- and early 20th-century Europe[edit] The symbol of the Wandervogel ("migratory bird") youth movement In fin de siècle Europe, from 1896–1908, a German youth movement known as Der Wandervogel began to grow as a countercultural reaction to the organized social and cultural clubs that centered on German folk music. Beat Generation[edit] 1960–1966[edit] Ken Kesey and the Merry Pranksters[edit] Red Dog Experience[edit] Anti-war protests[edit]

Blind men and an elephant The story of the blind men and an elephant originated in the Indian subcontinent from where it has widely diffused. It has been used to illustrate a range of truths and fallacies; broadly, the parable implies that one's subjective experience can be true, but that such experience is inherently limited by its failure to account for other truths or a totality of truth. At various times the parable has provided insight into the relativism, opaqueness or inexpressible nature of truth, the behavior of experts in fields where there is a deficit or inaccessibility of information, the need for communication, and respect for different perspectives. It is a parable that has crossed between many religious traditions and is part of Jain, Buddhist, Sufi and Hindu lore. The blind men and the elephant (wall relief in Northeast Thailand) The story[edit] In various versions of the tale, a group of blind men (or men in the dark) touch an elephant to learn what it is like. Jain[edit] A king explains to them:

Habits Of Mind Step 1 – Valuing Habits of Mind for yourself: For the Habits of Mind to have meaning for students they have to have meaning for teachers. Exploring and unpacking what is meant by each of the sixteen habits means to you and your colleagues is a great place to begin. Once teachers see the value of the Habits, it is easier and more authentic to help our students see their value. Eg: Persisting: When have you had to persist in your professional work? How do you overcome obstacles, barriers or demanding tasks in your work? Step 2 – Direct instruction in Habits of Mind Teach the students about each of the Habits of Mind in turn. Step 3 – Infuse Step 5 - Habits of Mind across the curriculum No one is expected to focus on all sixteen habits, all of the time. Eg Learning like a mathematician Several years ago I visited a maths departments in a secondary school who were choosing one Habit of Mind to focus on. How can you ensure Habits of Mind are at the centre of learning at your school?

Purify Our Mind The Beatles The Beatles were an English rock band that formed in Liverpool, in 1960. With John Lennon, Paul McCartney, George Harrison and Ringo Starr, they became widely regarded as the greatest and most influential act of the rock era.[1] Rooted in skiffle, beat and 1950s rock and roll, the Beatles later experimented with several genres, ranging from pop ballads to psychedelic and hard rock, often incorporating classical elements in innovative ways. In the early 1960s, their enormous popularity first emerged as "Beatlemania", but as their songwriting grew in sophistication they came to be perceived as an embodiment of the ideals shared by the era's sociocultural revolutions. History 1957–62: formation, Hamburg, and UK popularity In March 1957, John Lennon, then aged sixteen, formed a skiffle group with several friends from Quarry Bank school. Koschmider had converted a couple of strip clubs in the district into music venues, and he initially placed the Beatles at the Indra Club. "British Invasion"

Life review A life review is a phenomenon widely reported as occurring during near-death experiences, in which a person rapidly sees much or the totality of his or her life history in chronological sequence and in extreme detail. It is often referred to by people having experienced this phenomenon as having their life "flash before their eyes". The life review is discussed in some detail by near-death experience scholars such as Raymond Moody, Kenneth Ring, and Barbara Rommer. A reformatory purpose seems commonly implicit in accounts, though not necessarily for earthly purpose, since return from a near-death experience may reportedly entail individual choice. While experiencers, who number up to eight million in the United States,[1] sometimes report that reviews took place in the company of otherworldly beings who shared the observation, they also say they felt unjudged during the process, leaving themselves their own strongest critics. Duration[edit] Scope and clarity[edit] Effect[edit]

7 Lessons From 7 Great Minds Have you ever wished you could go back in time and have a conversation with one of the greatest minds in history? Well, you can’t sorry, they’re dead. Unless of course you’re clairaudient, be my guest. But for the rest of us, we can still refer to the words they left behind. Even though these great teachers have passed on, their words still live, and in them their wisdom. 1. “If you don’t know where you are going, you’ll end up someplace else.” - Lawrence J. In order for us to achieve our dreams, we must have a vision of our goals. Action: Visualize a life of your wildest dreams. 2. “It was a high counsel that I once heard given to a young person, “Always do what you are afraid to do.” - Ralph Waldo Emerson The best way to learn something is to dive right in to it. Action: You must define your fears in order to conquer them. 3. “All that we are is the result of what we have thought. Our thoughts determine our reality. Action: Create a list of your intentions and desires. 4. 5. 6. 7.

º Meaning and Purpose of Life. The Search for Truth; Consciousness, Personal and Spiritual Development

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