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Book-A-Minute Bedtime

The kids want a bedtime story again? Kids love it when their parents read to them at bedtime. But let's face it. In today's society, time is of the essence. There's only so much you can do in a day, and there isn't a lot of time left to spend with your children and a good book. Never fear. "That's nice," you say, "but I don't believe you." And, on Book-A-Minute SF/F... If you liked Book-A-Minute Bedtime, try our other Book-A-Minute pages: And try our companion site: RinkWorks Book-A-Minute Bedtime is a RinkWorks production. Talk Back Talk to us! Legalese Titles and trademarks are the property of their owners. Related:  Reading, Books, English-y Stuff

Mark - Night light bookmark. | relogik.com Project info Type:Personal, conceptField:Product designDate:June, 2008Phase:concept, visual prototypeShare: twitter facebook delicious digg stumbleupon friendfeed tumblr Awards / Publications:/Info / Description:Lampmark is a LED powered lamp for night reading. It automatically shuts off when covered with a book while at the same time it serves as a very intuitive bookmark. Other projects Teacher's Top 100 Books for Children The following list was compiled from an online survey in 2007. Parents and teachers will find it useful in selecting quality literature for children. Charlotte’s Web by E.B. White Where the Wild Things Are by Maurice Sendak The Giving Tree by Shel Silverstein Green Eggs and Ham by Dr. Seuss Good Night Moon by Margaret Wise Brown I Love You Forever by Robert N.

100 Best Novels « Modern Library ULYSSES by James Joyce Written as an homage to Homer’s epic poem The Odyssey, Ulysses follows its hero, Leopold Bloom, through the streets of Dublin. Overflowing with puns, references to classical literature, and stream-of-consciousness writing, this is a complex, multilayered novel about one day in the life of an ordinary man. Initially banned in the United States but overturned by a legal challenge by Random House’s Bennett Cerf, Ulysses was called “a memorable catastrophe” (Virginia Woolf), “a book to which we are all indebted” (T. Click here to read more about ULYSSES THE GREAT GATSBY by F. Set in the Jazz Age, The Great Gatsby tells the story of the mysterious millionaire Jay Gatsby, his decadent parties, and his love for the alluring Daisy Buchanan. A PORTRAIT OF THE ARTIST AS A YOUNG MAN by James Joyce Published in 1916, James Joyce’s semiautobiographical tale of his alter ego, Stephen Dedalus, is a coming-of-age story like no other. LOLITA by Vladimir Nabokov 1984 by George Orwell

Great Books Index - List of Titles An Index to Online Great Books in English Translation To obtain an index of an author's works, including any known online editions of each work, and online articles about that author, select the author's name. To obtain an index of online editions of a particular work, select the name of that work. Then you will be able to scroll up and down to see other works by that author and articles about the author. Authors are listed here in order of their birthdates (insofar as known). The Bible -- Homer -- Aeschylus -- Sophocles -- Euripides -- Herodotus -- Thucydides -- Hippocrates -- Aristophanes -- Plato -- Aristotle -- Euclid -- Archimedes -- Apollonius -- Lucretius -- Virgil -- Tacitus -- Epictetus -- Nicomachus -- Plutarch -- Ptolemy -- Marcus Aurelius -- Galen -- Plotinus -- St Augustine -- The Quran -- St Thomas Aquinas -- Dante -- Chaucer -- Erasmus -- Machiavelli -- Copernicus -- Rabelais -- John Calvin -- Montaigne -- William Gilbert -- Cervantes -- Francis Bacon -- Galileo -- William Shakespeare -- Johannes Kepler -- A.N.

On the difference between Good Dogs and Dogs That Need a Newspaper Smack. « Sindelókë Today I’m feeling 101-y, I guess, so let’s talk about privilege. It’s a weird word, isn’t it? A common one in my circles, it’s one of the most basic, everyday concepts in social activism, we have lots of unhelpful snarky little phrases we like to use like “check your privilege” and a lot of our dialog conventions are built around a mutual agreement (or at least a mutual attempt at agreement) on who has privilege when and how to compensate for that. But nonetheless fairly weird, opaque even if you’ve never used it before or aren’t part of those circles. It’s also, the way we use it, very much a cultural marker – like “Tolkienesque” or “Hall-of-famer” or “heteronormative,” you can feel fairly assured that a large number of people will immediately stop listening and stop taking you seriously the moment you use it. The fact that people are stupid isn’t news, however. At this point maybe I should actually start talking about what privilege is, huh? This is the basic heart of the idea. Well.

15 Books You Should Have Read in 2010 - Culture Image by Jane Mount, Courtesy 20x200 Yes, we read Freedom this year and yes, it was good. As Esquire put it, it “was one great slab of a book, at a time when most books have given up on greatness.” But there were other books in 2010, books that had to compete for our ever more challenged attention spans and won. So we asked a few members of the GOOD team & some of our good colleagues which book made their best list this past year. 1. Author: Stephen King Recommended by: Ben Jervey, Environment Editor Why read? 2. Author: George R.R. Recommended by: Morgan Clendaniel, Deputy Editor, GOOD Why read? 3. Author: Jan Gehl Recommended by: Alissa Walker, Contributing Editor, GOOD Why read? 4. Author: Tom Rachman Recommended by: Zach Frechette, Editor in Chief, GOOD Why read? 5. Author: Walter Van Tillburg Clark Recommended by: Cord Jefferson, Culture Editor, GOOD Why Read? 6. Author: Colum McCann Recommended by: Nicola Twilley, Food Editor, GOOD Why read? 7. Author: Diane Ravitch Why read? 8. Why read? 9.

Internet Resources - Writers Resources - Writing Links & Writers Unsorted [/writers] James Patrick Kelly - Murder Your Darlings - "When time comes to make that final revision, however, you must harden your heart, sharpen the ax and murder your darlings." Greda Vaso - Determining the Readability of a Book - includes formulas for Gunning's Fog Index, Flesch Formula, Powers Sumner Kearl L. Kip Wheeler - Literary Terms and Definitions L. Style - Grammar - Errors in English [/writers]American Heritage - Book of English Usage - free download Band-Aid AP StylebookPaul Brians - Common Errors in EnglishCJ Cherryh - Writerisms and other Sins The Chicago Manual of Style FAQ Gary N.

30 Very Funny Books--Seriously It's a dreary day, so I thought I'd indulge myself and come up with a list of my favorite comedies. A caveat, however: this is not a fancy English-professor-y list of the finest, most exquisitely crafted, most erudite or intellectually sophisticated works on paper in the language. This is a list of the books that make me laugh until my mascara starts to run. These are books to read over your first cup of coffee or just before you go to sleep . Remember: a day you've laughed is day you haven't wasted--even if you didn't get out of bed. Some days you need a jump-start to get to the funny parts of life. You've probably heard of most of these titles, and maybe you've already read several of them. You ready? 1. 2. 3. 4. 5. 6. 7. 8. 9. 10. 11. 12. 13. 14. 15. 16. 17. 18. 19. 20. 21. 22. 23. 24. 25. 26. 27. 28. 29. 30. And of course this is just the beginning.

Hannah Duston (Dustin) Hannah Duston Despite what Riverdale Elementary School's annual First-Grade Thanksgiving Day Class Play might have you believe, early Colonial America wasn't all one giant super happy mecha fun time made out of maize, delicious roasted turkey breast, and Pocahontas teaching John Smith the meaning of friendship and cooperation by baking pumpkin pies and putting out on the Sabbath – it was a sick, murderous hellhole of suck where freezing temperatures and near-constant warfare meant death was an omnipresent threat every time you stepped foot outside your crappy, poorly-insulated, makeshift shelter. On the one hand you had the Puritans – crazy, whacked-out European religious zealots intent on exerting their inflexible will over the New World one Smallpox-infected blanket at a time. Standing opposed to them were the Native Americans, who voiced their displeasure at this tactic by winging tomahawks into peoples' faces, murdering their families, and torching their settlements to cinders. Main

Flashcards: The world's largest online library of printable flas The 100 Best Books of All Time Many publishers have lists of 100 best books, defined by their own criteria. This article enumerates some lists of "100 best" books for which there are fuller articles. Among them, Science Fiction: The 100 Best Novels (Xanadu, 1985) and Modern Fantasy: The 100 Best Novels (Grafton, 1988) are collections of 100 short essays by a single author, David Pringle, with moderately long critical introductory chapters also by Pringle. For publisher Xanadu, Science Fiction was the first of four "100 Best" books published from 1985 to 1988. Lists[edit] See also[edit] References[edit]

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