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2 Apps to Embed Writing into Student’s Life

2 Apps to Embed Writing into Student’s Life
by John Hardison (from gettingsmart.com) I can’t even begin to quantify how many times I have been blessed with the challenge of working with a reluctant writer. During 14 years in the Language Arts classroom, I have heard “I hate writing” a thousand times. Sure, everybody loves those students who scan the writing prompt a couple of times just before their minds and hearts connect with the pens and bleed ink onto the paper in an effortless representation of creativity and mastery of rhetorical strategies. Taking natural writers to the next level is also a daunting task, but I will forever be grateful for those who stare at the paper with confusion and anxiety while hoping words will magically fill up the empty lines. How to Ignite Passion Into Reluctant Writers Some of my attempts to ignite a passion for writing in my students have failed, and no doubt various students have left my class on the last day of school still detesting the writing process. “So, you hate writing, huh?” Related:  LiteracyAcademic writing

Literacy » primaryedutech.com Toontastic is a fantastic cartoon creation tool on your iPad. This is a very accessible tool that can be used by children as young as five and be enjoyed just as much by big kids such as myself. Toontastic’s interface is separated into 5 easy steps to create your own cartoon. Step 1: Story Arc In the Story Arc you develop your story structure. Step 2: Setting Once you have chosen a scene to edit from the ‘Story Arc’, it is time to choose a setting for that scene. Step 3: Characters After you have chosen your setting you then need to pick your characters. Step 4: Animation This is the most exciting bit, animating your characters and giving them a voice. Step 5: Music After animating your scene you a brought to the ‘Music’ section. Once you have finished with your cartoon you can sit back and enjoy what you have created. I can see ‘Toontastic’ being used successfully in a classroom to assist students with developing their narrative story telling skills.

Story Map The Story Map interactive includes a set of graphic organizers designed to assist teachers and students in prewriting and postreading activities. The organizers are intended to focus on the key elements of character, setting, conflict, and resolution development. Students can develop multiple characters, for example, in preparation for writing their own fiction, or they may reflect on and further develop characters from stories they have read. After completing individual sections or the entire organizer, students have the ability to print out their final versions for feedback and assessment. The versatility of this tool allows it to be used in multiple contexts. Grades K – 2 | Lesson Plan | Standard Lesson Collaborative Stories 1: Prewriting and Drafting Students hone their teamwork skills and play off each other's writing strengths as they participate in prewriting activities for a story to be written collaboratively by the whole class. Grades K – 2 | Lesson Plan | Unit back to top

Wonderful Free Templates to Create Newspapers for your Class Earlier this year we wrote about web tools teachers can use to for their classrooms. This post turned We have selected for you today a host of awesome templates for your Power Point presentations. These are basically newspaper templates provided by Newspaper.net for free. If you want to create a newspaper for your class, you can do it through one of these templates. The procedure is very easy. 1- Newspaper Template for Word Download it HERE 2- Free Illustrator Newspaper Template Download it HERE 3- Adobe Illustrator Newspaper Template Download it HERE 4- Microsoft Word Newspaper Template Download it HERE 5- School Newspaper Template Download it HERE 6- Free Word Newspaper Template Download it HERE 7- Free Newspaper Template Download it HERE

Alternatives to Book Reports Being able to consume, critique, and create media is so important for our 21st century students. While I love to write about books in my book reviews, lots of children don't share my enthusiasm. If your kids or students groan at the mere mention of writing a book report, consider some alternative ideas. Instead of a book report, have your kids make a book trailer! If you're not sure where to start, check out this article by Kim Chatel, Making a Digital Story with Kids. You can find many examples of downloadable book trailers suitable for children at Book Trailers - Movies for Literacy. Making a book trailer or any short video with your kids/students is a perfect time to discuss copyright with them. Instead of a book report, have your kids design a poster. Instead of a book report, have your kids design an advertisement for the book. Instead of a book report, have your kids design a cartoon or comic. Instead of a book report, kids can turn their family, pets and friends into stars.

70 useful sentences for academic writing Back in the late 90s, in the process of reading for my MA dissertation, I put together a collection of hundreds of sentence frames that I felt could help me with my academic writing later on. And they did. Immensely. After the course was over, I stacked my sentences away, but kept wondering if I could ever put them to good use and perhaps help other MA / PhD students. So here are 70 sentences extracted and adapted for from the original compilation, which ran for almost 10 pages. Before you start:1. Arguea. Claima. Data a. Debate a. Discussion a. Evidence a. Grounda. Issue a. Premisea. Researcha.This study draws on research conducted by ___.b. If you found this list useful, check out The Only Academic Phrasebook You’ll Ever Need, which contains 600 sentences, as well as grammar and vocabulary tips.

8 Strategies for Teaching Academic Language "Change your language and you change your thoughts." -- Karl Albrecht Understanding Academic Language Academic language is a meta-language that helps learners acquire the 50,000 words that they are expected to have internalized by the end of high school and includes everything from illustration and chart literacy to speaking, grammar and genres within fields. Think of academic language as the verbal clothing that we don in classrooms and other formal contexts to demonstrate cognition within cultures and to signal college readiness. Where to Start It would be a mistake to think that academic language is a garbage pail category involving any word, depending on the context. If you are new to incorporating academic language into your lessons, a good place to begin is with Tier 2, high-frequency, general instruction words (such as paraphrase, summarize, predict and justify) that learners need to know for completing an activity, but that are not a lesson's primary learning objective. 1. 2. 3.

Ten Ways to Cultivate a Love of Reading in Students As a teacher, I was obsessed with cultivating a love of reading in my students. I love to read, loved it as a kid too. I'm equally compelled to ensure that my own child loves reading -- and he does. I well aware that I'm on a mission -- but I also know it's a worthy one! Here are ten suggestions for how any teacher, teaching any subject can participate in this mission, and how parents and administrators can help. Read. There's so much more we can all do -- from the superintendent to the classroom teacher, the custodian to the parent's association. Teaches, how do you cultivate a love of reading?

Timeline JS - Beautifully crafted timelines that are easy, and intuitive to use. Using StoryWorks and Edmodo for Debate and Persuasive Writing Tagged with: elementary schoolLanguage Arts This is a guest post from Lindsey Fuller, a 6th grade Elementary School Teacher in Decatur, Illinois. The full version of her post can be found on her blog at 6thgradetales.com. Connect with Lindsey on Edmodo or follow her @linlin8! My students really resist writing. Scholastic To The Rescue To teach persuasive writing, I recently shared an article with my students “Should Girls Play on Boys’ Sports Teams?” Taking Sides and Using Edmodo to Foster & Teach Debate In subsequent class periods, I then asked the students to choose a side and divided the class into groups that included people supporting both sides of the argument. Using Edmodo, I polled the class about their opinions. This allowed us to begin the debate on a small scale, and gave us some time to discuss debate etiquette and guidelines. The debate worked very well on Edmodo. Throughout the debate, I was able to follow along, participate, and moderate as necessary. Extending the Argument

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