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Marissa Mayer's 9 Principles of Innovation

Marissa Mayer's 9 Principles of Innovation
"There are two different types of programmers. Some like to code for months or even years, and hope they will have built the perfect product. That's castle building. Companies work this way, too. Apple is great at it. If you get it right and you've built just the perfect thing, you get this worldwide 'Wow!' I tell them, 'The Googly thing is to launch it early on Google Labs and then iterate, learning what the market wants--and making it great.' "We have this great internal list where people post new ideas and everyone can go on and see them. "Since around 2000, we let engineers spend 20% of their time working on whatever they want, and we trust that they'll build interesting things. "Eric [Schmidt, CEO] made this observation to me once, which I think is accurate: Any project that is good enough to make it to Labs probably has a kernel of something interesting in there somewhere, even if the market doesn't respond to it. "I used to call this 'Users, Not Money.'

http://www.fastcompany.com/702926/marissa-mayers-9-principles-innovation

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The Science of Great UI Driving to the airport, I stop to fill my car with fuel. I look at the pump and see the buttons shown in Figure 1. On the left button, the word Regular has been all but destroyed by people pushing it repeatedly in hopes of getting a response. I, too, push that big yellow Regular button for a while until I spot the relatively tiny Push Here button below, which has apparently been deemed insufficient by the masses. HOW TO MAKE GAMES WITH TWINE What's TWINE? Twine is a program that lets you generate interactive stories that are kind of like Choose Your Own Adventure Books. Why is Twine so wonderful? Twine was created by Chris Klimas. You can download it here. Some people have told me the Mac version is buggy - some people have told me it isn't!

VALS™ Survey Take the US VALS™ Survey! Find the link below. To Take the Survey: Click "Take The Survey" below (it will open in a separate browser window). untitled Ellen Domb, Ph.D. The TRIZ Institute, 190 N. Mountain Ave., Upland, CA 91786 USA (909)949-0857 FAX (909)949-2968 e-mail ellendomb@compuserve.com

Twine, the Video-Game Technology for All Photo Perhaps the most surprising thing about “GamerGate,” the culture war that continues to rage within the world of video games, is the game that touched it off. Depression Quest, created by the developers Zoe Quinn, Patrick Lindsey and Isaac Schankler, isn’t what most people think of as a video game at all. For starters, it isn’t very fun. Its real value is as an educational tool, or an exercise in empathy. Aside from occasional fuzzy Polaroid pictures that appear at the top of the screen, Depression Quest is a purely text-based game that proceeds from screen to screen through simple hyperlinks, inviting players to step into the shoes of a person suffering from clinical depression.

Bill Gross IdeaLabs a different kind of incubator Bill Gross has started over 75 companies and invested in many more. Thirty five of his companies have been acquired and 8 have gone the IPO route. Some of those companies include; Goto.com, Overture, CitySearch, NetZero, Tickets.com, CarsDirect.com, Shopping.com, eToys, Compete, Picasa (acquired by Google), InsiderPages, WeddingChannel.com, eSolar, Duron Energy, dotTV, Desktop Factory, Evolution Robotics, and UberMedia. Bill started IdeaLabs in 1996, long before the idea of startup incubators was popular. How the Brain Learns—A Super Simple Explanation for eLearning Professionals How the Brain Learns—A Super Simple Explanation for eLearning Professionals In his book, The Art of Changing the Brain, Dr. James Zull , notably suggested how David Kolb's famous four-phase model of the learning cycle can be mapped into four major brain processes. He believed that better understanding the learning processes that occurs in the brain encourages a more flexible approach to learning. It does, by extension, help us become better eLearning developers and learners.

TRIZ - What Is TRIZ? By Katie Barry, Ellen Domb and Michael S. Slocum Projects of all kinds frequently reach a point where all the analysis is done, and the next step is unclear. Brain-based Learning Definition This learning theory is based on the structure and function of the brain. As long as the brain is not prohibited from fulfilling its normal processes, learning will occur. Please note: since this article was published, Geoffrey and Renate Caine, leaders in brain-based learning research, have modified their principles on the topic. Please visit this Funderstanding article to learn about their updated views on brain based learning, which they are referring to as Brain/Mind Principles of Natural Learning. Discussion

TRIZ for Solutions Ellen Domb, Ph.D. The PQR Group, 190 N. Mountain Ave., Upland, CA 91786 (909)949-0857 Fax (909)949-2968 E-mail: EllenDomb@compuserve.com This paper was first presented at the Invention Machine Users Group Conference, Feb. 3-4, 1997, in New Orleans, LA USA. TRIZ as practiced in the late 1990's is a large, complex system consisting of a wide variety of tools and techniques. Neuro Myths: Separating Fact and Fiction in Brain-Based Learning New research on educational neuroscience tells us how kids learn -- and how you should teach. Credit: iStockphoto You've surely heard the slogans: "Our educational games will give your brain a workout!" Or how about, "Give your students the cognitive muscles they need to build brain fitness."

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