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Using @Evernoteschools for Lesson Planning

Using @Evernoteschools for Lesson Planning
Since I started this Experiment to use Evernote in every aspect of my classroom, I wasn't really sure what I was going to discover. I was sure there would be some way that Evernote was not going to meet my needs and I would be forced to add another tool to my chest while I continue the experiment for the school year. One way I was weary of was lesson planning. I have used the the traditional planner book for years and it has always been very good to me. I could easily flip back and see what I what I did the year before as I planned the upcoming school year. Here is a shot of my desktop version of Evernote. Within the notebooks for the specific classes, I have scanned and uploaded various assignments I had in paper form only and added them to new notes. Since all of my students will have Evernote accounts, I can easily share the assignments with the students in specially created notebooks. I have also created notebooks that contain notes on tech tips for using the various tools. Related:  interactive teaching

6 different ways of getting student feedback in your iPad lesson. Update 14-09-2012: Syncing Notability with Dropbox is possibly the easiest and best way of keeping track of your students’ work. One of the most difficult challenges for the teachers at my school is changing from workbooks and worksheets to get students to work and monitor their answers on the iPad. There are many ways to go about it. 1. This one, is my go to tool form creating questionnaires. 2. In my mentor class last year there were almost no students who did not have a twitter account. 3. Socrative allows you to fire questions at students in a game like setting. 4. iBooks Widgets I’ve previously written a post about making worksheets in iBooks. 5. Nearpod is the most advanced educational app I have used yet. 6. Keynote is often overlooked as a workbook app. Related posts:

How To Kill A Learner's Curiosity In 10 Easy Steps How To Kill Learner Curiosity In 12 Easy Steps by Terry Heick Ed note: This has been updated from a 2012 post that you may or may not have already read. So, there’s that. Killing a learner’s natural curiosity doesn’t happen overnight. Learning environments focused on standards, assessment, and compliance allow for the implementation of research-based strategies in pursuit of streams of data to prove that learning is happening. And who ever qualified for a job by demonstrating how strong their curiosity is anyway? Below are twelve tips to help stifle learner curiosity and keep the learning nice and tidy in your classroom this school year. Step 1. Whether physical or digital, individual or group, you’re the teacher (or “district curriculum coordinator”). Step 2. Voice and choice sound great in theory, but who knows better what a learner needs than the teacher. Step 3. Right is right. Step 4. Again, see #3. Step 5. Step 6. Collaboration is the stuff of legend. Step 7. Step 8. Step 9. 12.

Ofsted 2012: Questioning to promote learning — From Good to Outstanding: Helping you to achieve outstanding and creative teaching and learning. Have you ever noticed that often, when someone is being interviewed, they say “That’s a good question.”? It’s usually when it’s a question they can’t answer quickly and easily. Indeed, “good” questions are ones that generally need thinking about. Inspectors must consider whether: “teachers use questioning and discussion to assess the effectiveness of their teaching and promote pupils’ learning” School inspection handbook from September 2012 Notice, in this instance it does not say “ASSESS” learning, although clearly this is undeniably a major purpose for questioning. Questions that are easy to answer don’t move learning on; they might indicate that learning has happened, or that at least something has been noticed, thought about or memorised, but they don’t promote learning. How do questions promote learning? Questioning can fail because: Questioning succeeds when: What kinds of questions do you routinely ask, and how do you ask them ? E.g. E.g. T: How might you describe a hexagon? E.g. Applying

The Teacher’s Survival Kit for Lesson Planning! Tips & 1000s of Free Lesson Plans Posted by Shelly Terrell on Saturday, August 18th 2012 Goal 16: Plan An Engaging Lesson of The 30 Goals Challenge for Educators I cannot teach anybody anything, I can only make them think. – Socrates Lesson planning is stressful and time-consuming, but is important in giving us an action plan for the entire school year. The way we design our curriculums and the activities we use will determine how successful our learners will be in grasping new knowledge. Lesson design and planning is important. A Few Tips … When planning a lesson, I think we need to keep objectives in mind but there are other factors that make up a great lesson. G- group dynamic R- relevance to learners’ lives and needs E-emergent language and ideas focus A- attentiveness T- thoughtfulness To this list I would add flexibility. Templates Some of us will need a framework from which to build our lessons. Structured Templates: Another idea: Map our your lesson plan in a mindmap More Lesson Planning Tips: 1000s of Free Lesson Plans

He's not the messiah .. - news Comment:5 average rating | Comments (2)Last Updated:23 September, 2012Section:news … but for many policymakers he comes close. John Hattie, possibly the world’s most influential education academic, has the ear of governments everywhere. Professor John Hattie is, quietly, one of the most divisive figures in world education. For someone reputed to be unafraid to speak his mind, Hattie is remarkably blase about both points of view. So what is it that has made Hattie - often referred to the world’s most important educational researcher - the focus of such global attention and controversy? Speaking from Australia, where he has been director of the Melbourne Education Research Institute at the University of Melbourne since March 2011, Hattie initially comes across as relaxed and laid back. It is this characteristic outspokenness that has galvanised many of Hattie’s fiercest critics. Hattie’s confidence in his statements is well founded. Following the evidence “There are critics out there.

It's the Pedagogy, Stupid: Lessons from an iPad Lending Program Recently, we were tasked with developing policies and procedures for an equipment lending program initiated within the Faculty Technology Resources Center at the University of Cincinnati. The program was conceived as a method for encouraging the use of technology in the classroom. By loaning equipment to faculty for an academic term, we would encourage them to evaluate—and hopefully innovate—the utility of various "cutting edge" technologies with no financial risks to themselves or their departments. Some colleges and universities are already providing all incoming students with iPads. Generally, these tend to be smaller, private institutions or individual programs within larger ones. We're Here, Now What? Once we decided to implement the lending program we were excited, but also a little nervous. Load iPads with eBooks and then select and assign reading groups for certain books. How to Lend an iPad It's the Pedagogy, Stupid So, Just What Can You Do With an iPad in Class? References

Seating plans Excel blog UPDATE September 2013The day after I created and shared this sheet in my department (June 2013) a copy was seen by one of our SLT - I was asked to share it at the following morning's whole school briefing. Since then it's been used by a large number of teachers across the school. It has also been downloaded from the TES website almost 350 times, and I know it is in use in several other schools.I've just been asked by our headteacher (new since September) to share it again across all staff at our school on Monday.The version now available via the link below has been updated following feedback from use both in my department and beyond - it includes the ability to display more data on the plan and seat more students. Original post... Background For all sorts of reasons it's really useful to have student data visible on teacher copies of seating plans. This data will then be placed into correct place in the seating plan tab depending on where you put each individual pupil's number.

How Educators Are Using Pinterest for Showcasing, Curation Pinterest is the “in” site of 2012, and its phenomenal growth has sparked interest among millions of users. It’s also spread to journalism educators, who are increasingly experimenting with it in the classroom. The social network launched two years ago, but in recent months has drawn red-hot excitement for its unique visual, topic-based curation approach. While its 10 million users, especially women, are drawn to it almost obsessively, brands, media firms and news organizations have also planted flags on the network. Now J-school faculty are increasingly in on the act. From ‘mood boards’ to ‘survival boards’ One early adopter was University of Southern California’s Andrew Lih, who last October, long before he and many others knew the site would become a blockbuster, introduced it to online students in an entrepreneurial class to gather what he called a “mood board” for a project on public art. Aggregating images to share with students is an increasingly common classroom use for the tool. A.

wwwatanabe eThemes eThemes is your source for content-rich, kid-safe online resources that will help enhance your teaching and save you time. eThemes provides free, fast access to over 2,500 collections of websites, on topics ranging from Aerodynamics to Zebras and everything in between! By researching and creating these resources for you, eThemes will save you the time that you used to spend wading through millions of hits on Google, trying to find a few websites that meet your teaching needs. We do the searching for you, giving you more time to improve your lesson plans and actually teach! Teachers and their students, parents and their children, librarians and curriculum specialists — anyone who works in a teaching role can use our extensive database of eThemes knowing the resources are up-to-date and safe. You can either use keywords to search our database or browse the entire list of topics with the links below: No problem!

BYOT Network 21 st Century Educational Technology and Learning | K12 educational transformation through technology Why bother with #BYOD? « Learning Activist Have you wondered how to develop digital literacy in students? Have you wondered how to encourage self-directed learners? How to develop deep research skills? Of course this is all possible without technology, but why would you teach students skills without using the tools that they will need as soon as they leave school? In simple terms a BYOD program is any policy within a school which allows students to bring in their own devices and connect to any combination of the school network or the internet. The questions of “how do you use a device in the classroom?” Entry level BYOD programs might have students using the net to research some topics or students might create a web page within the school network environment. It becomes addictive and soon teachers are designing authentic and immersive learning activities where students are creating their own content and publishing on public web pages or youtube, ezines and powtoons. Like this: Like Loading...

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