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Using @Evernoteschools for Lesson Planning

Using @Evernoteschools for Lesson Planning
Since I started this Experiment to use Evernote in every aspect of my classroom, I wasn't really sure what I was going to discover. I was sure there would be some way that Evernote was not going to meet my needs and I would be forced to add another tool to my chest while I continue the experiment for the school year. One way I was weary of was lesson planning. I have used the the traditional planner book for years and it has always been very good to me. I could easily flip back and see what I what I did the year before as I planned the upcoming school year. Here is a shot of my desktop version of Evernote. Within the notebooks for the specific classes, I have scanned and uploaded various assignments I had in paper form only and added them to new notes. Since all of my students will have Evernote accounts, I can easily share the assignments with the students in specially created notebooks. I have also created notebooks that contain notes on tech tips for using the various tools.

6 different ways of getting student feedback in your iPad lesson. Update 14-09-2012: Syncing Notability with Dropbox is possibly the easiest and best way of keeping track of your students’ work. One of the most difficult challenges for the teachers at my school is changing from workbooks and worksheets to get students to work and monitor their answers on the iPad. There are many ways to go about it. 1. This one, is my go to tool form creating questionnaires. 2. In my mentor class last year there were almost no students who did not have a twitter account. 3. Socrative allows you to fire questions at students in a game like setting. 4. iBooks Widgets I’ve previously written a post about making worksheets in iBooks. 5. Nearpod is the most advanced educational app I have used yet. 6. Keynote is often overlooked as a workbook app. Related posts:

Ofsted 2012: Questioning to promote learning — From Good to Outstanding: Helping you to achieve outstanding and creative teaching and learning. Have you ever noticed that often, when someone is being interviewed, they say “That’s a good question.”? It’s usually when it’s a question they can’t answer quickly and easily. Indeed, “good” questions are ones that generally need thinking about. Inspectors must consider whether: “teachers use questioning and discussion to assess the effectiveness of their teaching and promote pupils’ learning” School inspection handbook from September 2012 Notice, in this instance it does not say “ASSESS” learning, although clearly this is undeniably a major purpose for questioning. Questions that are easy to answer don’t move learning on; they might indicate that learning has happened, or that at least something has been noticed, thought about or memorised, but they don’t promote learning. How do questions promote learning? Questioning can fail because: Questioning succeeds when: What kinds of questions do you routinely ask, and how do you ask them ? E.g. E.g. T: How might you describe a hexagon? E.g. Applying

He's not the messiah .. - news Comment:5 average rating | Comments (2)Last Updated:23 September, 2012Section:news … but for many policymakers he comes close. John Hattie, possibly the world’s most influential education academic, has the ear of governments everywhere. Professor John Hattie is, quietly, one of the most divisive figures in world education. For someone reputed to be unafraid to speak his mind, Hattie is remarkably blase about both points of view. So what is it that has made Hattie - often referred to the world’s most important educational researcher - the focus of such global attention and controversy? Speaking from Australia, where he has been director of the Melbourne Education Research Institute at the University of Melbourne since March 2011, Hattie initially comes across as relaxed and laid back. It is this characteristic outspokenness that has galvanised many of Hattie’s fiercest critics. Hattie’s confidence in his statements is well founded. Following the evidence “There are critics out there.

Seating plans Excel blog UPDATE September 2013The day after I created and shared this sheet in my department (June 2013) a copy was seen by one of our SLT - I was asked to share it at the following morning's whole school briefing. Since then it's been used by a large number of teachers across the school. It has also been downloaded from the TES website almost 350 times, and I know it is in use in several other schools.I've just been asked by our headteacher (new since September) to share it again across all staff at our school on Monday.The version now available via the link below has been updated following feedback from use both in my department and beyond - it includes the ability to display more data on the plan and seat more students. Original post... Background For all sorts of reasons it's really useful to have student data visible on teacher copies of seating plans. This data will then be placed into correct place in the seating plan tab depending on where you put each individual pupil's number.

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