background preloader

Photographs of America (1870-1920)

Photographs of America (1870-1920)
NetHugs.com – Inspirational eCards 19Jul/1246 source: shorpy.com Tagged as: America, nostalgia, old photographsLeave a comment Comments comments

http://nethugs.com/interesting/america-1870-1920/

Related:  Photo: 1800 - 1930Photography

20 Photographs From The 1930's I love old photos because this is the only way I can really see our history. I like to check out the details such as clothing, decorations or food products because is not only interesting to see their habits but also how these evolved during decades or centuries. The images below were taken in the ’30s in various circumstances from an ice-skating scene and all the way to a legendary image with Stalin fooling around. I hope that you like them as much as I do. Young skater with safety cushion Welcome to Dream View Website Poetry of nature moods with all its dreaming colors and sense of adventure is what we deeply feel in our heart under a dark crystal-clear starry night. Welcome to the world of dreaming views of nature and night sky. The galleries represent photography by Oshin D. Zakarian and Babak A.

Color Photos of New York from the 1940s A set of rare images captures the city's classic buildings along with its timeless spirit All photos courtesy of the Charles W. Cushman collection at Indiana University Saturn  l  Saturn facts, pictures and information. The Bringer of Old Age Saturn is the sixth planet from the Sun and the second largest: orbit: 1,429,400,000 km (9.54 AU) from Sun diameter: 120,536 km (equatorial) mass: 5.68e26 kg In Roman mythology, Saturn is the god of agriculture. The associated Greek god, Cronus, was the son of Uranus and Gaia and the father of Zeus (Jupiter). Saturn is the root of the English word "Saturday" (see Appendix 5).

The Great Depression in Colored Photographs Color presents an entirely different image. This is a photograph of Faro and Doris Caudill, farmers in Pietown, New Mexico. They lived in a dugout and struggled to survive on Resettlement Administration land. As the 1930s came to a close, Kodak came out with Kodachrome film – the first commercially viable color film available to the general public. The Photographers Society PHOTOGRAPHER FOCUS · Luca Adamo If you ask me for it, I will say that Luca Adamo makes mainly street photography. But it is not easy to define in a univocal way which can be understood as such: it is not even possible to find among photographers who love the genre even an uniform idea about the elements or traits that can define it. For some, it is as simple as picking up the camera, go out and find moments; these everyday situations in which people who pass beside us are usually involved.

Prohibition Prohibition of alcohol, often referred to simply as prohibition, is the legal act of prohibiting the manufacture, storage, transportation and sale of alcohol and alcoholic beverages. The term can also apply to the periods in the histories of the countries during which the prohibition of alcohol was enforced. History[edit] The Drunkard's Progress: A lithograph by Nathaniel Currier supporting the temperance movement, January 1846 The earliest records of prohibition of alcohol date back to the Xia Dynasty (ca. 2070 BC–ca. 1600 BC) in China. Yu the Great, the first ruler of the Xia Dynasty, prohibited alcohol throughout the kingdom.[1] It was legalized again after his death, during the reign of his son Qi. Shred of the Month February 2013 March 2014 - St. Patrick's Day Shred St.

Living Photos by Arthur Mole and John Thomas Taken at the beginning of the 20th century, by English photographer Arthur S. Mole and his American colleague John D. Thomas, these living photographs show thousands of American soldiers posing as symbols of American history. I’ve seen a few of these living photos on the internet before, but it’s nice to finally find some real info about them, like what they represent and how many people were needed to create them. via Telegraph.co.uk The Living Uncle Sam: 19,000 officers and men at Camp Lee, Virginia, January 13, 1919 What makes an outstanding image? (part 1) Apples. Nikon D800E, Zeiss ZF.2 2/100 Makro-Planar Of the 400 or so posts I’ve published up to this point, I recently realized that the one enormously gaping hole I haven’t yet covered deals with the one of the major fundamentals: how do you actually determine if an image ‘works’ or not? What makes it good? What makes it outstanding?

Prohibition in the United States Detroit police inspecting equipment found in a clandestine brewery during the Prohibition era Prohibition in the United States was a nationwide ban on the sale, production, importation, and transportation of alcoholic beverages that remained in place from 1920 to 1933.[1] The dry movement, led by rural Protestants and social Progressives in the Democratic and Republican parties, was coordinated by the Anti-Saloon League. Prohibition was mandated under the Eighteenth Amendment to the U.S. World Clock - Stats POODWADDLE WORLD CLOCKThe World Stats Counter (V 7.0) This minute 250 babies will be born, 100 people will die, 20 violent crimes will be reported, and the US debt will climb $1 million. The World Clock tells more than time. It shows a live picture of our changing world. The World Clock is too large for a single page.

Vintage photographs depict daily life in 19th century Japan Courtesans, geisha, samurai warriors, women playing instruments and traditional games are among the subjects portrayed in the most unique photography series of Edo-era Japan displayed at the London Photograph Fair. The images, dated back to 1865, were taken by Felice Beato and are hand-tinted albumen prints (black and white photos hand painted to appear 'colour'). Beato, who was living in Yokohama at the time, documented Japanese everyday life over the years. He is often considered as one of the world's first photojournalists, who gained his fame as a war photographer. A woman washing herself by Felice Beato, 1865 © : Galerie Verdeau, Paris/The London Photograph Fair

Tracy's Trinkets and Treasures: Angled Photography Ideas I really think this next party is going to be tons of fun. The party will be April 12th so you have plenty of time to snap those photos and create a post. Every time I take a photo I feel like I learn something.

Related: