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Wockets: Open Source Accelerometers for Phones Sensors and Software for Real-Time Activity Recognition on Mobile Phones The goal of this open source project is to create software and hardware that permits automatic, 24/7 physical activity and context detection on common mobile phones. We are doing this by iteratively designing and testing Wockets -- miniature, low-cost hardware devices that will measure human motion using accelerometers. Wockets will send data to mobile phones that are processed by software running on the phone to automatically detect type, duration and intensity of physical activity. The software that uses Wockets will be free and open source. This project is a collaboration between the Northeastern University Personal Health Informatics program, MIT House_n, and the Stanford Prevention Research Center. To receive occasional updates on the project, please join the project mailing list.

Bartle's Taxonomy of Player Types (And Why It Doesn't Apply to Everything) Richard Bartle co-created MUD (Multi-User Dungeon), the text-based precursor to today's MMORPGs, while studying at Essex University. He ended up formulating the theory that all MUD players could be broken down into four main types: killers, achievers, explorers, and socializers. This theory has since been used in all sorts of game design situations where it doesn't apply - let's look at what exactly it does tell us. MUD is a text-based adventure game (no graphics at all, only text) that had the then-unique attribute of being able to be played alongside other human players. It was one of the first online persistent worlds created, and you can still grab a MUD client today, connect to a server and play. It's a simplified version of pen and paper role-playing games in that the player has to imagine the world according to the information the Game Master (the server and the writer of the game, in this case) provides. Summary of Bartle's player types. Bartle calls it a bandwagon.

Here Is A Great Tool for Creating Educational Video Games to Use in Class February 10, 2016Pixel Press is an excellent application that enables you to draw your own video games. Teachers can create educational video games to use in class without the need for any coding skills. The process is very simple: use pen and paper to draw your game, take a picture of it via your iPad’s camera and Pixel Press does the rest and bring your game to life. You can either create on paper with ‘Draw-on-Paper’ and take a picture of it or use ‘Draw-in-App’ to directly draw on screen. When your game is created, you can then share it with the entire community in the ‘Arcade’. There is also a section in Pixel Press that provides free downloadable lesson plans for teachers.

GameMaker: Studio | YoYo Games Last updated: 02/04/2019 We (meaning YoYo Games Limited, company number 05260718) use technologies on our website and mobile services (which we'll call the Services) to collect information that helps us improve your online experience. We refer to these technologies, which include cookies, collectively as “cookies.” This policy explains the different types of cookies used on the Services and how you can control them. We hope that this policy helps you understand and feel more confident about our use of cookies. Cookies are small text files that are stored on your computer or mobile device. Below we list the different types of cookies we may use on the Services. Essential Cookies. Essential cookies on the Services may include: Performance Cookies. Performance cookies on this Services may include: Functionality Cookies. Targeting or Advertising Cookies. Banner Advertising On Other Websites Targeting and advertising cookies on this Services may include: Google Adwords Facebook Twitter Google Facebook

Tululoo HTML5 Game Maker The Game Creators - Make Your Own Game - Computer - Design and Making Software

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