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How to Make an Interactive Network Visualization

How to Make an Interactive Network Visualization
Networks! They are all around us. The universe is filled with systems and structures that can be organized as networks. Recently, we have seen them used to convict criminals, visualize friendships, and even to describe cereal ingredient combinations. We can understand their power to describe our complex world from Manuel Lima's wonderful talk on organized complexity. Now let's learn how to create our own. In this tutorial, we will focus on creating an interactive network visualization that will allow us to get details about the nodes in the network, rearrange the network into different layouts, and sort, filter, and search through our data. In this example, each node is a song. Try out the visualization on different songs to see how the different layouts and filters look with the different graphs. Technology This visualization is a JavaScript based web application written using the powerful D3 visualization library. jQuery is also used for some DOM element manipulation. Functions

http://flowingdata.com/2012/08/02/how-to-make-an-interactive-network-visualization/

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Directional Force Layout Diagram with varying link opacity Directional Force Layout Diagram with varying link opacity This is a follow-on graph to the Basic Directional Force Layout Diagram and the Directional Force Layout Diagram with Node Highlighting and builds on it by adjusting the opacity of the connecting links based on the value of the link in the force.csv file. index.html# force.csv# Health InfoScape When you have heartburn, do you also feel nauseous? Or if you're experiencing insomnia, do you tend to put on a few pounds, or more? By combing through 7.2 million of our electronic medical records, we have created a disease network to help illustrate relationships between various conditions and how common those connections are. Take a look by condition or condition category and gender to uncover interesting associations. About this data The information used for this visualization is based on 7.2 million patient records from GE's proprietary database, and represents some of the conditions that commonly affect Americans today.

The 3 Phases of Infographic Design Ever wondered about what goes into the process of making an infographic? Try Google-ing “process of creating a data visualization” and you’d be hard pressed to find a good explanation. Maybe the reason why it’s so difficult to find a good resource is because no real formal process exists. 100+ Awesome Open Courseware Links for Artists Posted by Site Administrator in Learning Tools Nov 20th, 2008 By Kelsey Allen Whether you’re into art theory, studying ancient art or making art yourself, you can find a range of online courses and lectures that can help educate you on your field of interest. Check out these open courseware resources to learn more, get fresh perspectives and expand your artistic horizons. Introductory Courses Learn the basics from these courses geared towards the beginner.

Jim Vallandingham Update: I moved the code to its own github repo – to make it easier to consume and maintain. Recently, the New York Times featured a bubble chart of the proposed budget for 2013 by Shan Carter . It features some nice, organic, animations, and smooth transitions that add a lot of visual appeal to the graphic. Sticky Force Layout This example demonstrates how to prevent D3’s force layout from moving nodes that have been repositioned by the user. When the force layout’s drag behavior dispatches a dragstart event, the fixed property of the dragged node is set to true. This prevents the force layout from subsequently changing the position of the node (due to forces).

Graphical visualization of text similarities in essays in a book The problem A collection of essays is collated for readers with visualizing graphics. The graphics should both serve as a thematic and structural overview of each text, and pose the essay in question in relation to the other essays in the book. 10 Steps To Designing An Amazing Infographic Information can be useful—and even beautiful—but only when it’s presented well. In an age of information overload, any guidance through the clutter comes as a welcome relief. That’s one reason for the recent popularity of information graphics. Infographics are visual designs that help to explain complicated data in a simple way (mental-health emergencies at Burning Man, anyone?). But how are they created?

Wikipedia - Web Archiving, Aspects of Curation Web archiving is the process of collecting portions of the World Wide Web to ensure the information is preserved in an archive for future researchers, historians, and the public. Web archivists typically employ web crawlers for automated capture due to the massive size and amount of information on the Web. The largest web archiving organization based on a bulk crawling approach is the Internet Archive which strives to maintain an archive of the entire Web. The International Web Archiving Workshop (IWAW), begun in 2001, has provided a platform to share experiences and exchange ideas. The later founding of the International Internet Preservation Consortium (IIPC), in 2003, has greatly facilitated international collaboration in developing standards and open source tools for the creation of web archives.

Fisheye Distortion It can be difficult to observe micro and macro features simultaneously with complex graphs. If you zoom in for detail, the graph is too big to view in its entirety. If you zoom out to see the overall structure, small details are lost. Focus + context techniques allow interactive exploration of an area of interest (the focus) in greater detail, while preserving the surrounding environment (the context). In the graph above, fisheye distortion magnifies the local region around the mouse, while leaving the larger graph unaffected for context. The localized, circular nature of the distortion can be seen clearly by applying it to a uniform grid:

How To Use Simple Excel Functions for Data Analysis In this series of video tutorials, ICIJ reporter Kate Willson demonstrates four basic yet essential Excel functions to assist with data analysis during investigative reporting. Want to see any other video tutorials about Computer-Assisted Reporting? Please let us know either in the comments below or at contact@icij.org. Interested in viewing more of our investigative reporting video tutorials? Radar graphs: Avoid them (99.9% of the time) Stephen Few doesn't like radar graphs, and he's not the only one who has written against them. In a recent discussion on Twitter, Jon Peltier said that they are "worse than pies" —ouch! Even Andy Kirk, who is usually as polite as a British gentleman can be, doesn't have nice words about this kind of display. Most of the arguments against radar graphs can be summarized in a couple of sentences from this post by Graham Odds: "Even with a common scale between axes, comparing values across them remains cumbersome and error-prone. This is because rather than the simple straight-line comparison our visual perception is hard-wired to perform that is found in “conventional” chart types, comparison in radar charts requires conscious thought to mentally project a sort of arc of rotation to map a value from one axis onto another, something we are not particularly adept at." I agree on that, something that you may find unsurprising if you have read my book already.

Kindling: An Introduction to Spark with Cassandra (Part 1) This is an introduction to the new (relatively) distributed compute platform Apache Spark. The focus will be on how to get up and running with Spark and Cassandra; with a small example of what can be done with Spark. I chose to make this the focus for one reason: when I was trying to learn Spark two months ago I had difficulty finding articles on how to setup Spark to use Cassandra. The process is actually not that difficult, but pulling all the steps together required some searching and investigation.

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