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Smart Gamification: Seven Core Concepts for Creating Compelling Experiences

Smart Gamification: Seven Core Concepts for Creating Compelling Experiences

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=F4YP-hGZTuA

Related:  Design PrinciplesGamification

How to build habit-forming products, part 3: closing the loop Facebook. Twitter. Pinterest. These popular apps are part of my daily life (and yours, too, I bet). But I use Wunderlist, Google Maps, and Pocket just as much. Products that infiltrate our daily routine aren’t just beautiful or addictive—many are also functional. Meaningful Play - coding conduct Meaningful Play Meaningful Play. Getting »Gamification« Right. The Magic Potion of Game Dynamics Michael Wu, Ph.D. is Lithium's Principal Scientist of Analytics, digging into the complex dynamics of social interaction and group behavior in online communities and social networks. Michael was voted a 2010 Influential Leader by CRM Magazine for his work on predictive social analytics and its application to Social CRM.He's a regular blogger on the Lithosphere's Building Community blog and previously wrote in the Analytic Science blog.

SessionM Gamification Tools Increase Engagement By 250 Percent With gamification being a great way to retain and engage users, a new study by SessionM shows that their tools helped increase retention by 35 percent and increased engagement by 250 percent. This is a huge jump for mobile publishers who continue to have a difficult time keeping users entertained and using their apps. SessionM helps developers add game mechanics to their apps including mPoints, a rewards system. Through analyzing publisher data and performing A/B testing while comparing SessionM users to non-users, they found that using their tools led to a large increase in engagement, and that users were forty times more likely to perform in-app activities such as checking in or sharing content.

Five Essential Steps for Gamifying Education Whether you are considering gamifying a single lesson, an entire curriculum, or a whole school, it can be a daunting and confusing process. Those who try their hand at integrating game mechanics into the classroom setting may meet with less than stellar results and give up after just one attempt. But effective gamification is a complex undertaking that requires both the motivation to work harder at making learning engaging for students and the dedication to experience, accept, and learn from failures when doing so. I have spent the past year gamifying my college-level composition courses and, while I am still by no means an expert at gamifying education, I have, in the process, learned a few things from my own failures. In reviewing these lessons while preparing the next iterations of two of my classes, I realized that they can be categorized into five distinct processes that will make the task of gamifying learning less daunting and will lead to more effective results. 1.

Gamification from a Company of Pro Gamers Michael Wu, Ph.D. is Lithium's Principal Scientist of Analytics, digging into the complex dynamics of social interaction and group behavior in online communities and social networks. Michael was voted a 2010 Influential Leader by CRM Magazine for his work on predictive social analytics and its application to Social CRM.He's a regular blogger on the Lithosphere's Building Community blog and previously wrote in the Analytic Science blog. You can follow him on Twitter at mich8elwu.

How Video Games Are Infiltrating Jesse Schell peered out at the 400 or so attendees of last February's DICE (design, innovate, communicate, entertain) Summit, the video-game industry's answer to TED. Dressed in a crinkly button-down shirt and chinos, the 40-year-old game designer and Carnegie Mellon professor had no idea how his speech would be received. Organizers had invited him to share insights about his work at Disney Imagineering, where he had helped design large-scale theme-park rides such as Pirates of the Caribbean, but he knew the Mouse would have his head if he violated any nondisclosure agreements. So the day before, on the flight from Pittsburgh to Las Vegas, he'd sketched out something radically different, something he titled "Beyond Facebook."

Gabe Zichermann: Gamification: The Hard Truths Gamification -- or the use of game, loyalty and economic concepts to engage consumers and employees -- has its fair share of detractors. Many of their criticisms dismiss gamification as a fad, criticize its use of game concepts, suggest its methods are shallow or believe its sole use is for marketing "evil." More often than not critics trot out examples of gamification that "failed" without any facts beyond their own personal opinion of the design. Our industry embraces these dissenting voices more than most -- we regularly invite skeptics to headline at GSummit, our industry's main conference. However we believe good criticism should be grounded in facts and a shared desire to make the world a better place.

Will Wright on Gamifying the World: From SimCity to the Future Will Wright Shares His Experience on Gamifying Systems and Simulations One of the most phenomenal experiences of GSummit SF 2013 happened with Will Wright’s keynote talk. As the creator of SimCity and countless other games and simulations, Wright’s talk goes deeply into games’ and their effect on us as humans in society and what that means for gamification in the grand scheme of things. He touches on the lessons can we take from games — and decades of experience designing for fun — to create engagement for large audiences with complex models and issues? How can we make simple everyday interactions more compelling and use them as teachable moments to energize society?

6 principles for designing trustworthy learning experiences. You know that feeling when you discover something in an app, or in a device, that makes you go “Wow, that’s cool!” while at the same time, feels slightly unnecessary for that something to exist? Maybe you can’t fully articulate why it just feels right or why it just works. At this point you’re thinking about ‘delight’. But keep in mind, delight is a brief event, and a fading emotion. Over time, delight slowly turns into something else. Persuasive Games: Exploitationware In the meantime, there's another lesson to learn from Frank Luntz: don't let the opposition set the terms of the debate. Instead, concoct better concepts with which to oppose them. In addition to his many verbal offensives, Luntz is also the architect of defensive phrases like "death tax," which invokes considerably more dissatisfaction than "estate tax."

5 examples of great gamification Here, we discover why gamification is an important aspect of web design and take a look at the best examples from around the web. What is gamification anyway? Gamification is the concept of bringing game mechanics or design to something that isn't usually considered game-like, whether it's a website, web app or native app. The goal is to make that traditional platform more engaging by adding a gaming edge to it. There are many different aspects of gaming that can be brought to a website or app. Some examples are: achievements, hidden bonuses, countdowns, progression, questing and status type information such as leader-boards.

Playing games for employment: Defining the mission Young people dig into the problems they face when looking for jobs. Photo: Emerson College In one of our previous blog posts, we showed why we want to tackle the problem of youth unemployment in Moldova by playing games. We want to share some of our first steps of defining the game – together with our partners from Emerson College and the National Youth Council of Moldova. Step 1: Meet CommunityPlanIt For the purpose of our project, we decided to adapt the CommunityPlanIt platform, successfully run by Emerson College in the US.

How to manufacture desire Type the name of almost any successful consumer web company into your search bar and add the word “addict.” Go ahead, I’ll wait. Try “Facebook addict” or “Twitter addict” or even “Pinterest addict” and you’ll get a slew of results from hooked users and observers deriding the addictive properties of these websites. How can these companies seemingly control users’ minds with little more than bits of code displayed on a screen?

Related:  Gamification