background preloader

Color: Meaning, Symbolism and Psychology

Color: Meaning, Symbolism and Psychology
Green occupies more space in the spectrum visible to the human eye and is second only to blue as a favorite color. Green is the pervasive color in the natural world that is an ideal backdrop in interior design because we are so used to seeing it everywhere. The natural greens, from forest to lime, are seen as tranquil and refreshing, with a natural balance of cool and warm (blue and yellow) undertones. Green is considered the color of peace and ecology. However, there is an "institutional" side to green, associated with illness or Government-issued that conjure up negative emotions as do the "slimy" or bilious greens. How the color green affects us physically and mentally * Soothing * Relaxing mentally as well as physically * Helps alleviate depression, nervousness and anxiety * Offers a sense of renewal, self-control and harmony For more information see "All About the Color Green"

Berkeley on Biphasic Sleep If you see a student dozing in the library or a co-worker catching 40 winks in her cubicle, don’t roll your eyes. New research from the University of California, Berkeley, shows that an hour’s nap can dramatically boost and restore your brain power. Indeed, the findings suggest that a biphasic sleep schedule not only refreshes the mind, but can make you smarter. Students who napped (green column) did markedly better in memorizing tests than their no-nap counterparts. Conversely, the more hours we spend awake, the more sluggish our minds become, according to the findings. “Sleep not only rights the wrong of prolonged wakefulness but, at a neurocognitive level, it moves you beyond where you were before you took a nap,” said Matthew Walker, an assistant professor of psychology at UC Berkeley and the lead investigator of these studies. In the recent UC Berkeley sleep study, 39 healthy young adults were divided into two groups — nap and no-nap.

16 Personality Factors The Sixteen Personality Factor Questionnaire (or 16PF),[1] is a multiple-choice personality questionnaire which was developed over several decades of research by Raymond B. Cattell, Maurice Tatsuoka and Herbert Eber. Beginning in the 1940s, Cattell used the new techniques of factor analysis (based on the correlation coefficient) in an attempt to try to discover and measure the source traits of human personality (Cattell, 1946)(Nevid, 2009).[2][3] The questionnaire measures the 16 primary traits, and the Big Five secondary traits,[4][5] which have become popularized by other authors in recent years. The test is an integral part of Cattell's comprehensive theory of individual differences. Outline of Test[edit] The 16PF Fifth Edition contains 185 multiple-choice items which are written at a fifth-grade reading level. When I find myself in a boring situation, I usually "tune out" and daydream about other things. Raymond Cattell's 16 Personality Factors[edit] Factor Analytic Strategy[edit]

Color symbolism Color symbolism in art and anthropology refers to the use of color as a symbol in various cultures. There is great diversity in the use of colors and their associations between cultures[1] and even within the same culture in different time periods.[2] In fact, the same color may have very different associations within the same culture at any time. For example, red is often used for stop signs[3] or danger.[4] At the same time, red is also frequently used in association with romance, e.g. with Valentine's Day.[5] White variously signifies purity, innocence, wisdom or death. Symbolic representations of religious concepts or articles may include a specific color with which the concept or object is associated.[6] There is evidence to suggest that colors have been used for this purpose as early as 90,000 BC.[7] Extensive associations for each color are listed in their respective articles. See also[edit] References[edit] External links[edit]

Neuroscience Neuroscience is the scientific study of the nervous system.[1] Traditionally, neuroscience has been seen as a branch of biology. However, it is currently an interdisciplinary science that collaborates with other fields such as chemistry, computer science, engineering, linguistics, mathematics, medicine and allied disciplines, philosophy, physics, and psychology. It also exerts influence on other fields, such as neuroeducation[2] and neurolaw. The term neurobiology is usually used interchangeably with the term neuroscience, although the former refers specifically to the biology of the nervous system, whereas the latter refers to the entire science of the nervous system. Because of the increasing number of scientists who study the nervous system, several prominent neuroscience organizations have been formed to provide a forum to all neuroscientists and educators. History[edit] The study of the nervous system dates back to ancient Egypt. Modern neuroscience[edit] Human nervous system

11 cheap gifts guaranteed to impress science geeks Science comes up with a lot of awesome stuff, and you don't need a Ph.D, a secret lab, or government funding to get your hands on some of the coolest discoveries. We've got a list of 11 mostly affordable gifts that are guaranteed to blow your mind, whether or not you're a science geek. Click on any image to see it enlarged. 1. Also known as frozen smoke, Aerogel is the world's lowest density solid, clocking in at 96% air. Aerogel isn't just neat, it's useful. Price: $35 2. Inside these sealed glass balls live shrimp, algae, and bacteria, all swimming around in filtered seawater. EcoSpheres came out of research looking at ways to develop self-contained ecosystems for long duration space travel. Price: $80 3. NASA has been trying to figure out how to get a sample of rock back from Mars for a while now. Every once in a while, a meteorite smashes into Mars hard enough to eject some rocks out into orbit around the sun. Price: $70+ 4. Price: $150 5. So what's next year's new color going to be? 6.

Did You Know?: The Meaning of Colors - Color Symbolism Just imagine how this world would be without colors or better still imagine yourself living in a world that is only in black and white. Would life be as beautiful, enjoyable and splendid as how it is now with regards to color? The beautiful blue sky would lose its unique color, trees and flowers their splendid colors just to name a few. Our behavior towards a lot of things that control our present lives would not exist. Color symbolism can vary dramatically between various cultures around the world that perceive colors completely different. RedExcitement, energy, passion, desire, movement, speed, strength, health, good fortune, vigor, power, heat, love, all things intense and passionate. Negative: aggression, danger, fire, blood, war, violence, lust, stop, revolution, overwhelming and agitated. Associations:Holiday: Yule (Christmas)Planet: MarsDay: TuesdayAstrological: Scorpio Some Cultures :Asia - sacred, imperial.Western cultures - joy, happiness. Some Cultures : Negative: mourning

10 Practical Uses For Psychological Research in Everyday Life | People love to give each other advice. The web is full to bursting with all types of pseudo-psychological advice about life. The problem is, how much of this is based on real scientific evidence? Well, here on PsyBlog we’ve got the scientific evidence. So here’s my top 10 list of what you can learn practically from the psychological research discussed here recently. 1. 2. 3. 4. 5. 6. 7. 8. 9. 10. Detect Lies Matchmaker and Dating Expert This article was co-authored by Maria Avgitidis. Maria Avgitidis is the CEO & Matchmaker of Agape Match, a matchmaking service based out of New York City. Co-authors: 252 Updated: June 4, 2020 Views: 4,240,713 Article SummaryX To detect if someone is lying, watch to see if they touch their nose or cover their mouth while they're talking, which could be a sign that they're not telling the truth. Did this summary help you?

Color & Meaning In Advertising COLOR & MEANING IN ADVERTISING Source: Red Red is the color of fire and blood, so it is associated with energy, war, danger, strength, power, determination as well as passion, desire, and love. Red is a very emotionally intense color. It enhances human metabolism, increases respiration rate, and raises blood pressure. It has very high visibility, which is why stop signs, stoplights, and fire equipment are usually painted red. Red brings text and images to the foreground. Light red represents joy, sexuality, passion, sensitivity, and love.Pink signifies romance, love, and friendship. Orange Orange combines the energy of red and the happiness of yellow. To the human eye, orange is a very hot color, so it gives the sensation of heat. Orange has very high visibility, so you can use it to catch attention and highlight the most important elements of your design. Yellow Yellow is the color of sunshine. Green Green is the color of nature. Blue Purple

The Ten Most Revealing Psych Experiments Psychology is the study of the human mind and mental processes in relation to human behaviors - human nature. Due to its subject matter, psychology is not considered a 'hard' science, even though psychologists do experiment and publish their findings in respected journals. Some of the experiments psychologists have conducted over the years reveal things about the way we humans think and behave that we might not want to embrace, but which can at least help keep us humble. 1. The Robbers Cave Experiment is a classic social psychology experiment conducted with two groups of 11-year old boys at a state park in Oklahoma, and demonstrates just how easily an exclusive group identity is adopted and how quickly the group can degenerate into prejudice and antagonism toward outsiders. Researcher Muzafer Sherif actually conducted a series of 3 experiments. 2. This infamous experiment to plumb the depths of evil in human hearts ended up affecting its lead researcher as much as its subjects. 3. 4.

100 Things Personality Test - VisualDNA VisualDNA brings a new layer of information to the world of technology that will help bring it closer to the people who use it – making it more enjoyable and relevant. Technology provides businesses with a surfeit of DATA – what and when. However it provides very little in the way of UNDERSTANDING – who did things, and why they did them. We see this effect in all areas of business from marketing to financial services. Despite all the targeting and site metrics, digital marketing isn’t getting any more effective. And despite all the data gathering there’s a limit to what credit histories can tell financial services about customers and potential customers. We have a different approach. In the financial sector this approach has led to a five-fold increase in ROI, in media we have seen 35% improvement in click rates. Watch a short video about VisualDNA. Learn more about our solutions for business:

Color Symbolism Theories (Article source: Color Logic for PowerPoint) Color conveys meanings in two primary ways - natural associations and psychological symbolism. No, it’s not mind control. The truth of the matter is that people are comfortable when colors remind them of similar things. For example, a soft shade of blue triggers associations with the sky and a psychological sense of calm. Successful design requires an awareness of how and why colors communicate meaning. As a starting point, the communicative properties of a color can be defined by two categories: natural associations and psychological (or cultural) associations. Natural Associations Occurrences of colors in nature are universal and timeless. Psychological or Cultural Associations Color may generate another level of meaning in the mind. Furthermore, color may have both positive and negative symbolism. Advertisement 1. 2. 3. 4. 5. More about color symbolism > Color Symbolism Influences Don't miss this section:The Meanings of Colors at Color Matters.

An On-Off Switch for Anxiety With the flick of a precisely placed light switch, mice can be induced to cower in a corner in fear or bravely explore their environment. The study highlights the power of optogenetics technology—which allows neuroscientists to control genetically engineered neurons with light—to explore the functions of complex neural wiring and to control behavior. In the study, Karl Deisseroth and collaborators at Stanford University identified a specific circuit in the amygdala, a part of the brain that is central to fear, aggression, and other basic emotions, that appears to regulate anxiety in rodents. They hope the findings, published today in the journal Nature, will shed light on the biological basis for human anxiety disorders and point toward new targets for treatment. “We want to conceptualize psychiatric disease as real physical entities with physical substrates,” says Deisseroth.

Related: