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Henry Miller on Reading, Influence, and What's Wrong with Education

Henry Miller on Reading, Influence, and What's Wrong with Education

How Higher Education Uses Social Media [INFOGRAPHIC] Schools are on a short list of organizations that have been notoriously slow to adopt emerging tech. But within the last few years, as social media becomes more integral to students' lives, educational institutions are finally catching on, and catching up. When it comes to higher ed, there are not only opportunities for digital learning, but digital marketing too. Some schools have taken the reigns on both sides, with mixed results. SEE ALSO: 5 Free Homework Management Tools for the Digital Student The infographic below takes a look at how schools have fared with social media over the last few years — what platforms are best, where they've succeeded, and the challenges that lay ahead. Does your alma mater use social media effectively in the classroom and in the recruitment office? Infographic by onlineuniversities.com. Image courtesy of iStockphoto, YinYang

The Role of Intuition and Imagination in Scientific Discovery and Creativity: A 1957 Guide by Maria Popova “Those who do not know the torment of the unknown cannot have the joy of discovery.” Last week, we took in some timeless vintage wisdom on the role of serendipity and chance-opportunism in creativity and scientific discovery, culled from the 1957 gem The Art of Scientific Investigation (public library; public domain) by Cambridge University animal pathology professor W. I. B. Today, as promised, we revisit Beveridge’s hefty tome to examine his ideas on the role of intuition and the imagination. Beveridge cites philosopher, psychologist, and educational reformer John Dewey‘s seminal 1933 book, How We Think, outlining Dewey’s model for conscious thinking: First we become aware of the difficulty or problem, which provides the stimulus; then, a suggested solution pops into the conscious mind; finally, a reason evaluates the idea to reject or accept it — if the idea is rejected, the mind goes back to the previous step and repeats. Indeed, Einstein himself put it thusly:

15 Ways to Live, and Not Merely Exist post written by: Marc Chernoff Email As Jack London once said, “The proper function of man is to live, not to exist.” Far too often we travel through life on autopilot, going through the motions, accepting what is, and having every day pass like the one before it. Everything seems relatively normal and comfortable, except that constant twitch in the back of your mind that’s saying, “It’s time to make some changes.” Here are 15 simple suggestions for those who want to break free from the mold and truly live more of their life – to experience it and enjoy it to the fullest, instead of settling for a mere existence. Appreciate the great people and things in your life. – Sometimes we don’t notice the things others do for us until they stop doing them. Photo by: Toni Blay If you enjoyed this article, check out our new best-selling book. And get inspiring life tips and quotes in your inbox (it's free)...

Nikhil Goyal, Teen Author, Shares Thoughts On How To Reform America's School System Fox Business interviewed 17-year-old Nikhil Goyal to get the teen author’s thoughts on how to go about reforming the nation’s school system. Goyal recently wrote a book about the problems with American schools titled “One Size Does Not Fit All: A Student’s Assessment of School,” due out in September. Included in Goyal’s recommendations for how to fix schools is repealing No Child Left Behind, abolishing Race to the Top and “reinventing the teaching profession.” He also takes issue with testing, referring to it as “harmful and inappropriate.” Goyal spoke to the importance of changing the model of the school system, which he claims still resembles the industrial model of the early 20th century, making it the one American institution that hasn’t changed. (Former Republican presidential hopeful Rick Santorum has also deemed the American school system an artifact of the Industrial Revolution.)

10 Rules for Students and Teachers (and Life) by John Cage and Sister Corita Kent by Maria Popova “Nothing is a mistake. There’s no win and no fail, there’s only make.” Buried in various corners of the web is a beautiful and poignant list titled Some Rules for Students and Teachers, attributed to John Cage, who passed away twenty years ago this week. The list, which can be found in Sister Corita’s Learning by Heart: Teachings to Free the Creative Spirit (public library), touches on a number of previously discussed themes and materials, including Bertrand Russell’s 10 commandments of teaching, the importance of embracing uncertainty, the pivotal role of work ethic, the intricate osmosis between intuition and intellect, and the crucial habit of being fully awake to everything. RULE ONE: Find a place you trust, and then try trusting it for awhile.RULE TWO: General duties of a student — pull everything out of your teacher; pull everything out of your fellow students.RULE THREE: General duties of a teacher — pull everything out of your students. Donating = Loving

How to Find Your Purpose and Do What You Love “Find something more important than you are,” philosopher Dan Dennett once said in discussing the secret of happiness, “and dedicate your life to it.” But how, exactly, do we find that? Surely, it isn’t by luck. I myself am a firm believer in the power of curiosity and choice as the engine of fulfillment, but precisely how you arrive at your true calling is an intricate and highly individual dance of discovery. Still, there are certain factors — certain choices — that make it easier. Every few months, I rediscover and redevour Y-Combinator founder Paul Graham’s fantastic 2006 article, How to Do What You Love. What you should not do, I think, is worry about the opinion of anyone beyond your friends. More of Graham’s wisdom on how to find meaning and make wealth can be found in Hackers & Painters: Big Ideas from the Computer Age. Alain de Botton, modern philosopher and creator of the “literary self-help genre”, is a keen observer of the paradoxes and delusions of our cultural conceits.

STEAM Ahead: Merging Arts and Science Education Akua Kouyate, Wolf Trap’s senior director of education (Courtesy of Teddy Wolff) During tough economic times, arts and music programs are often some of the first programs cut in schools. But at Wolf Trap’s Institute for Early Learning Through the Arts , investing in arts education has been a priority for the past 31 years. A study by the National Endowment for the Arts shows that students from lower socio-economic backgrounds who actively participated in the arts tended to score better in science and writing, and were more likely to aspire to college. The study used survey data gathered over 20 years that followed socially and economically disadvantaged students, from kindergarten into their early twenties. At Wolf Trap’s Institute of Education, they are trying something different by incorporating art with math and science. It’s a difficult assertion to make when the U.S. is falling further behind in math and sciences as compared to other countries. Video courtesy of Wolf Trap

Maira Kalman on Identity, Happiness, and Existence by Maria Popova “How are we so optimistic, so careful not to trip and yet do trip, and then get up and say OK?” In this wonderful short video, Maira Kalman — the remarkable artist, prolific author, unmatched storyteller, and one of my favorite hearts and minds in the world — shares some wisdom on identity, happiness, and existence. Watch and take notes. The idea that you’d have to say ‘goodbye’ to all this — even though it’s infuriating and maddening and frightening and horrible, some of the time — is even more infuriating and maddening and horrible: How do you spend this time without perpetually being so broken-hearted about saying the eventual goodbye? I usually say, in the end, okay, it’s love and it’s work — what else could there possibly be? Speaking to the fluidity of character and the myth of fixed personality, Kalman observes: How do you know who you are? Here are some of the beautiful, poignant quotes Kalman reads and shows from her published works. How do you know who you are?

Live an Exceptional Life - Robin Sharma How do you craft an exceptional life? Ultimately, life goes by in a blink. And too many people live the same year 80 times. Exercise daily.Get serious about gratitude.See your work as a craft.Expect the best and prepare for the worst.Keep a journal.Read The Autobiography of Benjamin Franklin.

Joel Klein, Sal Khan And Sebastian Thrun On Inventing The Future Of Education, At Disrupt SF Three trailblazing figures in educational technology are showcasing the future of learning at our upcoming annual conference, Disrupt San Francisco. Former New York education Chancellor, Joel Klein, will get into more of the details about the recently announced Amplify project, News Corp’s ambitious venture to create tailored, digital learning for the American education system. Bill Gates’ “favorite teacher”, Sal Khan, who founded the Youtube-based Khan Academy, will speak about his pioneering work in the “flipped classroom” and launch a new feature to his site. And Google fellow and CEO of Udacity, Sebastian Thrun, will discuss how he opened the walled garden of American higher education free of charge to students around the world. These education leaders will join an all-star lineup at Disrupt SF Sept 8-12, including Yahoo CEO Marissa Mayer, Marc Benioff, Ron Conway, Kevin Rose, Matt Cohler, TechCrunch founder Michael Arrington, Vinod Khosla and many others. In January 2011, Joel I.

Which Is Bigger: A Human Brain Or The Universe? : Krulwich Wonders... This is one of those fun-to-think-about questions. A brain isn't much to look at, after all. It's about the size of your two fists put together, three pounds to hold, but oh my, what it can do. Robert Krulwich/NPR With our brains, we can think backwards, imagine forwards, conjure, create things that don't exist, leap vast distances. ...let's you and I rocket off the Earth and keep going, out past Neptune, then past the nearest star, then on and on across a patch of cold empty space until we reach an interstellar gas cloud glowing pale blue, and when we get there, let's fly to the top, hover near a small baby star softly glowing, and move in closer to see it peeking out from the top of the cloud... Can you see this with me? If a brain can make crazy leaps across the cosmos and bring extra passengers along (like you when you listen to me), then in a metaphorical way, the brain is bigger than what's around it, wrote 19th century poet Emily Dickinson. I like her confidence. That's Silly

The science behind what motivates us to get up for work every day 2.6K Flares Filament.io 2.6K Flares × The following post is a guestpost by Walter Chen, founder of a unique new project management tool IDoneThis. More about Walter at the bottom of the post. So, here is the thing right at the start: I’ve always been uncomfortable with the traditional ideal of the professional — cool, collected, and capable, checking off tasks left and right, all numbers and results and making it happen, please, with not a hair out of place. An effective employee, no fuss, no muss, a manager’s dream. I admit that I’ve never been able to work that way. Feelings provide important feedback during our workday. What does emotion have to do with our work? It turns out, quite a lot. Psychologists Teresa Amabile and Steven Kramer interviewed over 600 managers and found a shocking result. 95 percent of managers misunderstood what motivates employees. “The larger the monetary reward, the poorer the performance. – money doesn’t motivate us, at all, instead emotions do.”

Investment in K-12 education innovation is soaring, but it’s not all rosy When it comes to public education, it looks like private investors and entrepreneurs are ready to rally like it’s 1999. After several years of relative drought, K-12 education, which has long been seen as a tough nut to crack for private business, is starting to draw investment at nearly record levels, outpacing higher education financing for the first time in several years. According to GSV Advisors, a Chicago-based investment firm that specializes in education, in 2011, transactions in K-12 education climbed to $389 million, which is up from a low point of $13 million in 2005 and more than three times the investment in the sector in 2010. By comparison, even though online education startups like Coursera, Udacity, 2tor and others have attracted big buzz for major funding rounds, higher education as a whole received about $271 million in financing in 2011, a decline of 13 percent since 2010. Policy changes, ed startup accelerators, technological shifts drive growth

How To Design a Lucky Life I'm no extrovert and I apply most of these to my life already. being an extrovert is no requirement: generosity, humbleness, asking questions, getting to know your neighbors, never speaking negatively...none of these are "extrovert" activities. Sure it might help with asking questions, etc, but sometimes we gotta suck it up and do uncomfortable things. I clearly wasn't talking about the ones where extroversion isn't a requirement. I'm talking about things like "never eat alone". Also, asking questions and getting to know your neighbors? My point: I didn't say what I said because I refuse to "suck it up", I said it because instructions like those and "be social" are given as if it's not a difficult and stressful thing for a lot of people to do. I hear you. It's sad that saying how important you are can be more beneficial than actually being important.

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