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The Role of Questions in Teaching, Thinking and Le

The Role of Questions in Teaching, Thinking and Le
One of the reasons that instructors tend to overemphasize "coverage" over "engaged thinking" is that they assume that answers can be taught separate from questions. Indeed, so buried are questions in established instruction that the fact that all assertions — all statements that this or that is so — are implicit answers to questions is virtually never recognized. For example, the statement that water boils at 100 degrees centigrade is an answer to the question "At what temperature centigrade does water boil?" Hence every declarative statement in the textbook is an answer to a question. Hence, every textbook could be rewritten in the interrogative mode by translating every statement into a question. To my knowledge this has never been done. Thinking is Driven by Questions Thinking is not driven by answers but by questions. Questions define tasks, express problems and delineate issues. This is why it is true that only students who have questions are really thinking and learning.

http://www.criticalthinking.org/pages/the-role-of-questions-in-teaching-thinking-and-learning/524

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Slang of the Fifties Slang has always been the province of the young. Words come in and out of favor in direct proportion to the speed with which they travel through the age ranks. Once college kids know that high school kids are using a term, it becomes passe. Noam Chomsky Avram Noam Chomsky (born December 7, 1928) is an American linguist, philosopher, political activist, author, and lecturer. He is an Institute Professor and professor emeritus of linguistics at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology. Linguistics[change | edit source] Chomsky created the theory of generative grammar.

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