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Loki

Loki
Loki, from an 18th-century Icelandic manuscript In both the Poetic Edda and the Prose Edda, the goddess Skaði is responsible for placing a serpent above him while he is bound. The serpent drips venom from above him that Sigyn collects into a bowl; however, she must empty the bowl when it is full, and the venom that drips in the meantime causes Loki to writhe in pain, thereby causing earthquakes. With the onset of Ragnarök, Loki is foretold to slip free from his bonds and to fight against the gods among the forces of the jötnar, at which time he will encounter the god Heimdallr and the two will slay each other. Loki is referred to in the Poetic Edda, compiled in the 13th century from earlier traditional sources; the Prose Edda and Heimskringla, written in the 13th century by Snorri Sturluson; the Norwegian Rune Poems, in the poetry of skalds, and in Scandinavian folklore. Names The etymology of the name Loki has yet to be solved. The name Hveðrungr (Old Norse '? Attestations Poetic Edda Related:  Things that make me go hmmmAsatru

Norse Mythology: Ragnarok Ragnarök All of the other stories in this section tell of what has already happened. This story tells of what is yet to come. Ragnarök is the doom of the gods, and the end of the world. It begins with three winters of wars in Miðgarð. Then Fimbulvetr follows, the winter of winters, with bitter frosts and biting winds. Then the end will begin. Cocks will crow to raise the dead in Hel's realm and the giants in Jötenheim. Meanwhile, the gods, roused by Heimdall's horn, will meet in council. On the field of battle, Óðin will engage Fenrir, while Þór will be attacked by Jörmangandr. Loki and Heimdall will meet again and cause each other's death. Surtr will fling fire in all directions. The earth will rise again out of the water, fair and green. Víðar and Váli, sons of Óðin, will still be alive and will make their way back to Iðavöll, the shining plain where the halls of the gods once stood. Two humans, Líf and Lífðrásir, who hid themselves deep within Yggdrasil, will see light.

Sign of the horns A demonstration of the Sign of the Horns The sign of the horns is a hand gesture with a variety of meanings and uses in various cultures. It is formed by extending the index and little fingers while holding the middle and ring fingers down with the thumb. Superstition[edit] In Italy and some Mediterranean cultures, when confronted with unfortunate events, or simply when these events are mentioned, the sign of the horns may be given to ward off bad luck. It is also used traditionally to counter or ward off the "evil eye" (malocchio). In Peru one says contra (against). Offensive gesture[edit] European and North American popular culture[edit] Contemporary use by musicians and fans[edit] [edit] Ronnie James Dio was known for popularizing the sign of the horns in heavy metal.[7][8] He claimed his Italian grandmother used it to ward off the evil eye (which is known in Southern Italy as malocchio). Terry "Geezer" Butler of Black Sabbath can be seen "raising the horns" in a photograph taken in 1971.

Trickster Mythology[edit] Loki cuts the hair of the goddess Sif. Frequently the Trickster figure exhibits gender and form variability, changing gender roles and even occasionally engaging in same-sex practices. Such figures appear in Native American and First Nations mythologies, where they are said to have a two-spirit nature. Loki, the Norse trickster, also exhibits gender variability, in one case even becoming pregnant. He shares the ability to change genders with Odin, the chief Norse deity who also possesses many characteristics of the Trickster. In some cultures, there are dualistic myths, featuring two demiurges creating the world, or two culture heroes arranging the world — in a complementary manner. British scholar Evan Brown suggested that Jacob in the Bible has many of the characteristics of the Trickster: Coyote[edit] Coyote often has the role of trickster as well as a clown in traditional stories. More often than not Coyote is a trickster, but he is always different. Archetype[edit]

Thor In Norse mythology, Thor (/θɔr/; from Old Norse Þórr) is a hammer-wielding god associated with thunder, lightning, storms, oak trees, strength, the protection of mankind, and also hallowing, healing and fertility. The cognate deity in wider Germanic mythology and paganism was known in Old English as Þunor and in Old High German as Donar (runic þonar ᚦᛟᚾᚨᚱ), stemming from a Common Germanic *Þunraz (meaning "thunder"). Ultimately stemming from Proto-Indo-European religion, Thor is a prominently mentioned god throughout the recorded history of the Germanic peoples, from the Roman occupation of regions of Germania, to the tribal expansions of the Migration Period, to his high popularity during the Viking Age, when, in the face of the process of the Christianization of Scandinavia, emblems of his hammer, Mjölnir, were worn in defiance and Norse pagan personal names containing the name of the god bear witness to his popularity. Name[edit] Attestations[edit] Roman era[edit] Post-Roman Era[edit]

Revelation 12 Sign in the heavens of Jesus Birthing His Apostles Chapter 10 This brief study will show that God not only gave a sign in the heavens (the stars) as a witness to His Son Jesus' birth 2000 years ago, but that He is also giving a sign in the heavens (the stars) to our generation who is witnessing another birth: The birth of Jesus restoring modern day apostles to His Church government. When His government is fully established in His people, the spotless Bride of Christ will arise in the power of the Holy Spirit to finish the ministry of Jesus in the earth (see Isaiah 60). The Bride of Christ arising and shining is the beginning of Jesus' return to rule and reign the earth during this new millennium. There is a difference between astronomy and astrology. Genesis 1:14 And God said, Let there be lights in the firmament of the heaven to divide the day from the night; and let them be for signs , and for seasons, and for days, and years. Each number below is shown in the following celestial map: 1) Paula M.

Street Spirit (Fade Out) "Street Spirit (Fade Out)" (commonly referred to as "Street Spirit") is a song by English alternative rock band Radiohead, featured on their second studio album The Bends, which was released in 1995. Noted by singer-songwriter and guitarist Thom Yorke as "one of [the band's] saddest songs" and describing it as "the dark tunnel without the light at the end", "Street Spirit" was released as the band's ninth single and reached number five on the UK Singles Chart, the highest chart position the band achieved until "Paranoid Android" from OK Computer, which reached number three in 1997. Yorke has suggested that the song was inspired by the 1991 novel The Famished Road, written by Ben Okri, and that its music was inspired by R.E.M.[1] The track is built around a soft melody in A minor with an arpeggio (broken chord) guitar part. In 2008, the song was featured on Radiohead: The Best Of, a compilation album.

Sleipnir Additionally, Sleipnir is mentioned in a riddle found in the 13th century legendary saga Hervarar saga ok Heiðreks, in the 13th century legendary saga Völsunga saga as the ancestor of the horse Grani, and book I of Gesta Danorum, written in the 12th century by Saxo Grammaticus, contains an episode considered by many scholars to involve Sleipnir. Sleipnir is generally accepted as depicted on two 8th century Gotlandic image stones; the Tjängvide image stone and the Ardre VIII image stone. Scholarly theories have been proposed regarding Sleipnir's potential connection to shamanic practices among the Norse pagans. In modern times, Sleipnir appears in Icelandic folklore as the creator of Ásbyrgi, in works of art, literature, software, and in the names of ships. Attestations[edit] Poetic Edda[edit] Prose Edda[edit] An illustration of Odin riding Sleipnir from an 18th-century Icelandic manuscript. In chapter 16 of the book Skáldskaparmál, a kenning given for Loki is "relative of Sleipnir 36.

Heimdallr Heimdallr brings forth the gift of the gods to mankind (1907) by Nils Asplund In Norse mythology, Heimdallr is a god who possesses the resounding horn Gjallarhorn, owns the golden-maned horse Gulltoppr, has gold teeth, and is the son of Nine Mothers. Heimdallr is attested as possessing foreknowledge, keen eyesight and hearing, is described as "the whitest of the gods", and keeps watch for the onset of Ragnarök while drinking fine mead in his dwelling Himinbjörg, located where the burning rainbow bridge Bifröst meets heaven. Heimdallr is said to be the originator of social classes among humanity and once regained Freyja's treasured possession Brísingamen while doing battle in the shape of a seal with Loki. Heimdallr and Loki are foretold to kill one another during the events of Ragnarök. Names and etymology[edit] Heimdallr also appears as Heimdalr and Heimdali. Heimdallr is attested as having three other names; Hallinskiði, Gullintanni, and Vindlér or Vindhlér. Attestations[edit]

The Gods and Goddesses of the Norse Religion Meet the Gods and Goddesses of the Norse Pantheon Odin (or, depending upon the dialect Woden or Wotan) was the Father of all the Gods and men. Odhinn is pictured either wearing a winged helm or a floppy hat, and a blue-grey cloak. He can travel to any realm within the 9 Nordic worlds. Thor, or Donnar, also known as the Thunderer, was considered to be a son of Odin by some, but among many tribes Thor actually supplanted Odin as the favorite god. Freya is considered to be the goddess of Love and Beauty, but is also a warrior goddess and one of great wisdom and magick. Freyr (Fro Ingwe) is Freya's twin brother. Tyr (or Tiw, Ziw) is the ancient god of War and the Lawgiver of the gods. Loki, the Trickster, challenges the structure and order of the Gods, but is necessary in bringing about needed change. Heimdall is the handsome gold-toothed guardian of Bifrost, the rainbow bridge leading to Asgard, the home of the Gods. Skadi is the Goddess of Winter and of the Hunt. Astrological Connections

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