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Patterns in nature

Patterns in nature
Natural patterns form as wind blows sand in the dunes of the Namib Desert. The crescent shaped dunes and the ripples on their surfaces repeat wherever there are suitable conditions. Patterns in nature are visible regularities of form found in the natural world. These patterns recur in different contexts and can sometimes be modelled mathematically. Natural patterns include symmetries, trees, spirals, meanders, waves, foams, arrays, cracks and stripes.[1] Early Greek philosophers studied pattern, with Plato, Pythagoras and Empedocles attempting to explain order in nature. The modern understanding of visible patterns developed gradually over time. In the 19th century, Belgian physicist Joseph Plateau examined soap films, leading him to formulate the concept of a minimal surface. Mathematics, physics and chemistry can explain patterns in nature at different levels. History[edit] The American photographer Wilson Bentley (1865–1931) took the first micrograph of a snowflake in 1885.[10]

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Patterns_in_nature

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Golden ratio Line segments in the golden ratio In mathematics, two quantities are in the golden ratio if their ratio is the same as the ratio of their sum to the larger of the two quantities. The figure on the right illustrates the geometric relationship. The 83 best infographics Every picture tells a story, as they say, but sometimes it takes a clever combination of words and pictures to tell a story quickly, concisely and in an entertaining fashion. The best infographics may look like they were simple to create in Photoshop, but designing an effective piece of data visualization is usually anything but. There are several great tools to create infographics, but to these examples of infographics from around the web will show you how you can take it a step further and add a bit of style and personality to your data. A few of these are now several years out of date but they can still provide some inspiration for those of you looking to create an infographic from scratch.

Essential Math for Games Programmers As the quality of games has improved, more attention has been given to all aspects of a game to increase the feeling of reality during gameplay and distinguish it from its competitors. Mathematics provides much of the groundwork for this improvement in realism. And a large part of this improvement is due to the addition of physical simulation. Creating such a simulation may appear to be a daunting task, but given the right background it is not too difficult, and can add a great deal of realism to animation systems, and interactions between avatars and the world. This tutorial deepens the approach of the previous years' Essential Math for Games Programmers, by spending one day on general math topics, and one day focusing in on the topic of physical simulation. It, like the previous tutorials, provides a toolbox of techniques for programmers, with references and links for those looking for more information.

Snowflake Snowflake viewed in an optical microscope A snowflake is either a single ice crystal or an aggregation of ice crystals which falls through the Earth's atmosphere.[1] They begin as snow crystals which develop when microscopic supercooled cloud droplets freeze. Snowflakes come in a variety of sizes and shapes. Complex shapes emerge as the flake moves through differing temperature and humidity regimes, such that individual snowflakes are nearly unique in structure. Snowflakes encapsulated in rime form balls known as graupel. Snowflakes appear white in color despite being made of clear ice.

14 Ways to Present Information Visually Lots of information to share? Making an infographic? Here are 14 ways to visually organize your information, with examples and tips on when to use them. There are two ways to discover the best way to go about presenting information or a story visually: L-system L-system trees form realistic models of natural patterns Origins[edit] 'Weeds', generated using an L-system in 3D. As a biologist, Lindenmayer worked with yeast and filamentous fungi and studied the growth patterns of various types of algae, such as the blue/green bacteria Anabaena catenula. Originally the L-systems were devised to provide a formal description of the development of such simple multicellular organisms, and to illustrate the neighbourhood relationships between plant cells.

Sacred geometry As worldview and cosmology[edit] The belief that God created the universe according to a geometric plan has ancient origins. Plutarch attributed the belief to Plato, writing that "Plato said God geometrizes continually" (Convivialium disputationum, liber 8,2). In modern times the mathematician Carl Friedrich Gauss adapted this quote, saying "God arithmetizes".[2]

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