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Best Gothic Books Of All Time (249 books)

Best Gothic Books Of All Time (249 books)
Related:  Can there be delight in horror?Why not write your own Gothic Novel or Short StoriesGothic Fiction

How to Write a Gothic Tale | Writerly Life Ghosts, vampires, and werewolves are experiencing a resurgence in fiction nowadays. Vampire lit is back in fashion, as is the kind of bleak, gripping horror writing that first found popularity with Edgar Allen Poe almost two centuries ago. Gothic writing is masterful when it’s done right, and it’s important to know the rules in order to do this genre justice. Mood and Terror The first thing to remember about gothic writing is that it is all about crafting mood and terror. Read and study the masters When embarking on a genre work like a gothic story, it’s important to study the masters and understand how they do what they do. After the jump: understanding the rules of the gothic genre. Understand the rules of gothic writing. The unique and often disquieting aspect of gothic stories is that they create a whole world similar to our own but a bit off. Remember this strong sense of justice when you try writing a gothic story.

The Gothic Novel: What is Gothic Literature? In many ways, the Gothic novel is a direct response to eighteenth century ideals of formal realism, which is why it is essential to understand formal realism first before defining Gothic literature. Formal realism is about creating a reality through the experience of one single character. Its focus lies in the internal drama of the individual rather than the external and explores individual consciousness and perception. Furthermore, formal realism uses diction that is less elaborate and ornate than the literature of the past in order to reflect everyday life. Its overall goal is to educate the reader on both how to read and how to behave. In Ian Watt's The Rise of the Novel, he claims that Samuel Richardson, Henry Fielding, and Daniel Defoe are the authors of works that were the very beginnings of formal realism and the rise of the novel in eighteenth century England. Pamela is about a servant girl, Pamela, who finds herself in the service of a gentleman who attempts to seduce her.

The Romantic Age: Topic 2: Overview The Gothic begins with later-eighteenth-century writers' turn to the past; in the context of the Romantic period, the Gothic is, then, a type of imitation medievalism. When it was launched in the later eighteenth century, The Gothic featured accounts of terrifying experiences in ancient castles — experiences connected with subterranean dungeons, secret passageways, flickering lamps, screams, moans, bloody hands, ghosts, graveyards, and the rest. By extension, it came to designate the macabre, mysterious, fantastic, supernatural, and, again, the terrifying, especially the pleasurably terrifying, in literature more generally. Closer to the present, one sees the Gothic pervading Victorian literature (for example, in the novels of Dickens and the Brontës), American fiction (from Poe and Hawthorne through Faulkner), and of course the films, television, and videos of our own (in this respect, not-so-modern) culture. My own agitation and anguish was extreme during the whole trial.

The Gothic Novel David De Vore Anne Domenic Alexandra Kwan Nicole Reidy I. Introduction "Gothic" has come to mean quite a number of things by this day and age. It could mean a particular style of art, be it in the form of novels, paintings, or architecture; it could mean "medieval" or "uncouth." It could even refer to a certain type of music and its fans. A. The Goths, one of the many Germanic tribes, fought numerous battles with the Roman Empire for centuries. B. Centuries passed before the word "gothic" meant anything else again. II. The Gothic novel took shape mostly in England from 1790 to 1830 and falls within the category of Romantic literature. As Ann B. The setting is greatly influential in Gothic novels. The Gothic hero becomes a sort of archetype as we find that there is a pattern to their characterization. The plot itself mirrors the ruined world in its dealings with a protagonist's fall from grace as she succumbs to temptation from a villain. III. IV. A. B. Works Cited: Evans, Bertrand.

How to write a book - Now Novel Elements of the Gothic Novel Robert Harris Version Date: June 15, 2015 The gothic novel was invented almost single-handedly by Horace Walpole, whose The Castle of Otranto (1764) contains essentially all the elements that constitute the genre. Walpole's novel was imitated not only in the eighteenth century and not only in the novel form, but it has influenced the novel, the short story, poetry, and even film making up to the present day. Gothic elements include the following: 1. The castle may be near or connected to caves, which lend their own haunting flavor with their darkness, uneven floors, branchings, claustrophobia, and mystery. Translated into the modern novel or filmmaking, the setting might be in an old house or mansion--or even a new house--where unusual camera angles, sustained close ups during movement, and darkness or shadows create the same sense of claustrophobia and entrapment. 2. In modern novels and filmmaking, the inexplicable events are often murders. 3. 4. 5. 6. 7. 8. 9. 10. 1. 2. 3. 4. 5. 6.

Episodes Archive - A Podcast to the Curious – The M.R. James Podcast In this episode Mike and Will investigate strange goings on in 17th Century Devon in Martin’s Close by M.R. James. Unrequited love, scoundrel squires, courtroom highjinx, bloody judges, amorous yokels and barbarous murder are all on the cards. Don’t forget to check out our Visit to Martin’s Close Video on YouTube. Show notes: Notes on Martin’s Close by Rosemary Pardoe (Ghosts and Scholars) Ghosts and Scholars remains the number #1 source for Jamesian scholarship, and these notes on Martin’s Close are essential reading. Sampford Courtenay, Devon (Wikipedia) In the intro to ‘Complete Ghost Stories’ (1931) James admitted that the village he had in mind for Martin’s Close was Sampford Courtenay in Devon. The New Inn at Sampford Courtenay (www.the-newinn.com) The pub featured in Martin’s Close is a real place, a grade II listed old coaching inn originally build in the 16th Century. Judge George Jeffreys (Wikipedia) The anti-hero of Martin’s Close is the famous ‘bloody judge’ George Jeffreys.

How To Write A Novel Using The Snowflake Method Writing a novel is easy. Writing a good novel is hard. That’s just life. If it were easy, we’d all be writing best-selling, prize-winning fiction. Frankly, there are a thousand different people out there who can tell you how to write a novel. In this article, I’d like to share with you what works for me. This page is the most popular one on my web site, and gets over a thousand page views per day, so you can guess that a lot of people find it useful. Good fiction doesn’t just happen, it is designed. For a number of years, I was a software architect designing large software projects. I claim that that’s how you design a novel — you start small, then build stuff up until it looks like a story. If you’re like most people, you spend a long time thinking about your novel before you ever start writing. But before you start writing, you need to get organized. Step 1) Take an hour and write a one-sentence summary of your novel. Some hints on what makes a good sentence: Shorter is better.

Conventions of the Gothic Genre There are a number of techniques, devices and conventions common to a great deal of Gothic literature: WEATHER: used in a number of ways and forms, some of these being: Mist - This convention in Gothic Literature is often used to obscure objects (this can be related to the sublime) by reducing visibility or to prelude the insertion of a terrifying person or thing; Storms - These frequently accompany important events. Flashes of lightening accompany revelation; thunder and downpours prefigure the appearance of a character or the beginning of a significant event; Sunlight - represents goodness and pleasure; it also has the power to bestow these upon characters.THE SUBLIME: The definition of this key term has long been a contested term, but the idea of the sublime is essential to an understanding of Gothic poetics and, especially, the attempt to defend or justify the literature of terror. This of course is a selection of only a few elements of a novel, and no text is this predictable.

thin-ghost How to Write a Gothic Tale | Writerly Life Ghosts, vampires, and werewolves are experiencing a resurgence in fiction nowadays. Vampire lit is back in fashion, as is the kind of bleak, gripping horror writing that first found popularity with Edgar Allen Poe almost two centuries ago. Gothic writing is masterful when it’s done right, and it’s important to know the rules in order to do this genre justice. Mood and Terror The first thing to remember about gothic writing is that it is all about crafting mood and terror. If you look back at the more famous Poe stories, such as “The Fall of the House of Usher”, you can see that Poe begins to create his mood from the first line, crafting a scene of gray clouds, creepy old houses, and an otherwise forboding landscape. Read and study the masters When embarking on a genre work like a gothic story, it’s important to study the masters and understand how they do what they do. After the jump: understanding the rules of the gothic genre. Understand the rules of gothic writing.

Gothic motifs What does it mean to say a text is Gothic? Professor John Bowen considers some of the best-known Gothic novels of the late 18th and 19th centuries, exploring the features they have in common, including marginal places, transitional time periods and the use of fear and manipulation. Professor John Bowen discusses key motifs in Gothic novels , including the uncanny, the sublime and the supernatural. Gothic is a literary genre, and a characteristically modern one. Strange places It is usual for characters in Gothic fiction to find themselves in a strange place; somewhere other, different, mysterious. Front cover for 1919 edition of Dracula Castle Dracula from the cover of the thirteenth edition of Bram Stoker’s Dracula, 1919. View images from this item (1) Great Expectations illustrated by John McLenan Miss Havisham and the decaying Satis House from Charles Dickens’s Great Expectations, illustrated by John McLenan, 1861. View images from this item (16) Clashing time periods Melmoth the Wanderer

Uncle Montague's Nether Regions

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