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History of architecture starts when first time men though to build beautifully. A building without beauty is merely a structure, not an art. Utilitarian considerations of a building, stability and strength are works of engineers. It’s the work of architects to add the beauty to it. Architecture is actually an art which guides us to harmonize in a building both the beauty and utility requirements of a building. Architecture stands at top in the category of useful arts.

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archdaily The design of the new Swiss Embassy in Yaoundé, designed by Matteo Cainer Architects, pays tribute to its renewed presence in the Cameroon and a respect for the uniqueness of the site. The resulting proposal is an elegant ensemble that encapsulates the identity and self-image of the Swiss people and their values. The calm external simplicity of the proposal conceals an inner complexity while achieving a sustainable design, which was another key in the process. Architecture - Sweet Station Shingle House by Ramella Architects Concepts for the Shingle House are drawn from the American roofed houses, included the request for a large Bay-Window with roof Shingles. The sloping lines of the coverage, form a sloping wall that gives a movement in the facades, and the roof touch the ground. The pillars are extended and bent to the outside to form a set. Noteworthy are the colors gray to the roof type and predominantly white finishes like paint and flooring natural stones. The classic model of Bay-Window requested by the owners, was stylized to create effects internally and followed the coverage.

Architecture Fieldwork Design & Architecture have collaborated with the Nike Workplace Brand Design group to design some feature walls for the NIKE expansion buildings. The wall is constructed of salvaged maple gym flooring, and creates a branded, meaningful statement of arrival at the office in Beaverton, Oregon. Continue Reading » cityofsound The primary interface between the UK’s planning system and the people and places it serves is a piece of A4 paper tied to a lamppost in the rain. OK, not always rain. But rain often enough. The paper is a public notice describing a planning application for some kind of ‘development’ somewhere in the vicinity. If it’s a significant development, and very close to your property, you may also get a notification in the post.

Dezeen UK designers David Ben Grünberg and Daniel Woolfson have devised a concept for a shape-shifting house that morphs to deal with changing times of day, seasons and weather conditions (+ movie). Woolfson and Grünberg launched The D*Haus Company to develop the concept for the experimental house, which would fold into different configurations so that it can take on up to eight different shapes. The house was first conceived as part of Grünberg's graduation project. "It was originally devised as a home for Lapland to deal with extreme temperatures," Woolfson told Dezeen. "Not many people know it, but they have warm summers and also really cold winters." He went on to explain how they've since developed the concept so that the house could be used anywhere in the world.

Daily tonic ‘Jellies Family’ tableware by Patricia Urquiola for Kartell ‘Jellies Family’ is a line of plates, trays, glasses, bowls and carafes made of brilliant coloured and transparent PMMA designed by Patricia Urquiola, part of a designer series of tableware for Kartell known as Kartell in Tavola. (more…) Chez Carl Tapas & BBQ by Jean de Lessard, photo: © Adrien Williams Montreal-based Jean de Lessard has created a restaurant interior inspired by fractal theory, an interpretation of nature’s geometry and its irregularities, matched with vibrant colours and complemented with natural materials. archidose A couple weeks ago I featured The Boxwood Winery by Hugh Newell Jacobsen on my weekly page, the fifth of such a building type that I've featured. Boxwood and thefourotherprojects are a varied mix that illustrates the relative freedom given architects for a fairly new building type that sits somewhere between the pastoral and the commercial. The Novelty Hill-Januik Winery in Woodinville, Washington by Seattle's Mithun is another notable winery that balances building and landscape to "celebrate wine's agrarian roots." The building itself is a balance of expansive, industrial concrete surfaces, soft woods and large glazed areas that make the winery an inviting location that doesn't gloss over its industrial context (the building sits between two railroad lines and just south of numerous large industrial buildings) or the industrial mechanisms that make large-scale winemaking possible.

Modative Modative Interview by Business of Architecture Posted by Derek Leavitt on Tue, Apr 15, 2014 @ 08:05 AM Last year we had the pleasure of having Enoch Sears from the Business of Architecture visit our office and conduct an on-camera interview. We've always really appreciated Enoch's approach of focusing on the business side of architecture, something that has been a vital part of our practice. So, last week, Enoch published the interview on his website and we are very happy with the results. It's an open and honest depiction of the critical issues we've faced in the last few years, which include (taken from Business of Architecture's website):

Worldarchitecturenews This exquisite market hall in Ghent, Belgium is the work of a partnership between Robbrecht en Daem Architecten and Marie-Jose Van Hee Architecten. The barbed structure spikes across a 24,000 sq m site formerly home to a desolate parking lot in the centre of Ghent, commanding the space between the spires of St Nicholas Church, the Belfry and a Cathedral. Designed to encourage local residents to convene in the market square for social gatherings and public events, the pavilion above ground marks the location of the brasserie, bicycle park and public toilets below ground, accessible through a new lower ‘green’.

Dream Homes In designing the project, NY-based architecture firm GRADE responded to two disparate conditions of the site: the expansive views of Chesapeake Bay and the mystic wooded area on which it resided. The objective was to reconcile the client’s need for a studio in which to design and create while not rendering the space hermetic and closed off to its surroundings. GRADE brought nature’s elements indoors, establishing a foundation of earthy textures including natural mahogany wood and a curved zinc rooftop, complemented by imported materials such as Italian marble. Through thoughtful design, the house became an apparatus for filtering the views of the water, with the curved roof allowing the scale of the beachside room to expand the closer one’s proximity to the bay. I just love the mirror mosaic – so glam…

admnetwork Mont de Marsan Mediatheque, Mont de Marsan (France), 2012 Project by archi5 A covered cultural square, a place of discovery, gatherings and exchanges. The Media Library is a strong cultural symbol for the Marsan urban area. It is a place of discovery, gatherings and exchanges for its users. Architecture Spectacular scenery – and sheep – are the first things that come to mind for most of us when we think of New Zealand. For an architect, spectacular scenery is always both a challenge and an opportunity. This was very much the situation for David Ponting, founder of Ponting Fitzgerald (in 1998) of Ponsonby, Auckland, New Zealand, when he saw the site for what his affluent client hoped would be a “sanctuary.” The site was breathtaking with unbelievable views of Lake Wakatipu in Queenstown, New Zealand, and the mountains beyond.

mocoloco A little wild: 25hours Bikini Berlin Hotel by Studio Aisslinger is 149 rooms of seamless urban jungle theme: eclectically furnished public spaces bursting with plants; each room's decor keyed to the view, warm and natural for the side overlooking the elephants and monkeys in the Berlin Zoo, harder-edged when facing the West Berlin cityscape. (Click the images below for full sized images) Details: Just opened in the historic Bikini-Haus building, the seventh in the 25hours designer hotel group. Architectural features of the natural-meets-urban theme include a rooftop restaurant in a greenhouse with a 360° view. Spaces include the Working Lab, Bikini Island, the Monkey Bar and a DJ corner. Designer: Studio Aisslinger, in Berlin, is home to Werner Aisslinger, whose wide-ranging work includes products, furniture and architecture, firsts in new material use, clients from Mercedes-Benz to Hugo Boss, and objects in permanent collections at MoMA and other museums around the world.

Order, Formulas, and Rules by Frank Cunha III It seems like when you finally get it right in Architecture, Art, Music, Fashion, etc, you become a “sellout.” So what is Right? How can we get it right? Will anyone know the difference?

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