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12 Lists That Help You Get Things Done

12 Lists That Help You Get Things Done
At the center of just about every personal productivity system are lists – GTD has it’s context lists, Pomodoro has it’s action inventory and daily to-do lists, todoodlist has, well, the todoodlist, and so on. But there are a lot of different kinds of lists besides your task or to-do list that can help you be more productive. Lists in general are powerful tools – open-ended, constantly growing, and effective at extending our memories past the 7 or so things we can keep on our mind at any given time. Some of the lists that can make you more productive or otherwise make life easier include: Task lists: Naturally, the most obvious is the task list, a simple list of things you have to do. All those lists seems like a lot to juggle, doesn’t it? Actually, it’s not that hard. Pen-and-paper: A notebook (I like Moleskines and Moleskine knockoffs, but whatever works) can be easily modified to make all your lists accessible. Wikis: Wikis are excellent list management tools. Related:  LIFEHACKS

9 Reasons Why Getting Things Done Sucks! Blasthemy! I hope the productivians don’t strike me down ;) Here is my list of issues with GTD that I have picked out. These are a mix of my own and other’s experiences that were shared in a previous post asking the readers what they disliked. This is meant as a one-sided critique and as such is not strictly representative of my true feelings. GTD is David Allen’s system There are so many personal interpretations of GTD. Get It Done App | Getting Things Done GTD software, task manager, and to-do list, and project management. The 80 Best Lifehacks of 2008 - Stepcase Lifehack And so we arrive yet again at the end of another year. 2008 was at best a mixed bag – while the world was electrified by the US election and it’s promise of change, the global economy was shaken to its core as a decade of financial mismanagement and willful blindness finally caught up with us. Gas prices spiked, leading us all to ask some difficult questions about sustainability, efficiency, and consumption – and then plummeted, leaving us feeling somewhat relieved, but baffled by the unpredictability of it all. As we roll into 2009, there is an atmosphere of suspenseful anticipation, of hope mixed with not a little uncertainty. Here at Lifehack, we’ve always followed a path of cautious optimism. Here, then, are the best posts of 2008, selected according to their popularity and the amount of discussion they generated both here on the site and across the blogosphere. Communication Fitness/Health Are You Following the Wrong Exercise Program? Lifestyle Productivity Success/Achievement Technology

Write Here, Write Now, Write Anywhere: 13 Free Web-Based Word Pr Imagine the situation: You’re visiting your parents’ home for the holidays, a thousand miles from your own PC, when inspiration strikes, a brilliant idea for the next plot twist in your novel! Or consider: you’re on a business trip and your laptop is stolen — and the proposal you’re working on is due tomorrow! Or you’re on campus when you remember you have an assignment due in two hours — and you live an hour away! Maybe you have a thumb drive you keep your work on; now all you have to do is find a PC that can read your files, and hope you remembered to backup the files you need right away. But advances in web technology over the last couple years have given us another way to work from anywhere, no matter what computer we have access to, as long as we have access to the Internet: online word processors. An online word processor gives you the ability to create, edit, save, and access your documents from anywhere. New Kid on the Block: Adobe Buzzword I do have a few very minor complaints.

10 More from the Webware 100 - Stepcase Lifehack Last week, I looked at the apps chosen by CNet for the productivity section of the Webware 100. There were, however, 10 other sections – 9 categories of apps voted for as top in their class and an extra categories of apps chosen by the editors at CNet. This week, I want to look at a selection of applications from the rest of the Webware 100, with an eye towards their use to increase or improve personal productivity. Some of the categories aren’t very productivity-oriented, like the music and audio section – I love Pandora and Amazon MP3, but I can’t say they help with my productivity in anything but the most indirect way (by giving me music to listen to while I’m working). The browsing category is particularly useless – picking the 10 best apps for web browsing is a bit like picking your ten best fingers. 1. 2. I certainly don’t need to sing the praises of Skype – the VoIP service is already beloved by many. 3. Like Skype, the glories of Gmail are widely known. 4. 5. 6. 7. 8. 9.

Getting started with "Getting Things Done" This article was originally posted during the first week of 43 Folders' existence, and, pound for pound, it remains our most popular page on the site. Please be sure to also visit related pages, browse our GTD topic area, plus, of course you can search on GTD across our family of sites. I’ll be talking a lot here in coming weeks about Getting Things Done, a book by David Allen whose apt subtitle is “The Art of Stress-Free Productivity.” You’ve probably heard about it around the Global Interweb or have been buttonholed by somebody in your office who swears by GTD. (It probably takes a backseat only to the Atkins Diet in terms of the number of enthusiastic evangelists: sorry about that.) Like I did the other day with Quicksilver, I wanted to provide a gentle, geek-centric introduction to Getting Things Done, so that you can think about whether it might be right for you. The Problem with “stuff” Stuff is bouncing around in our heads and causing untold stress and anxiety. GTD is geek-friendly

GTD Cheatsheet: The Workflow This is the first part in a refresher series on the basics of Getting Things Done. Ok, I’m going to jump right in. Getting Things Done (or GTD) is a system to free your mind of it’s resources and become more organized in the process. In short: it’s a way to become more productive and stress free, in one fell swoop. It’s a beautiful thing, really. The book deals mainly with the processes to the GTD system which include clearing your mind (and living space) of useless clutter, organizing it, and storing it in appropriate places, and reviewing it on a consistent basis. The Workflow The workflow is a very powerful thing. Once you see something that needs to be organized, you ask the question What is it? Is it doable? Well, if it’s doable or actionable (meaning it takes 2 or less minutes to complete), go ahead and do it. If it’s doable, but takes multiple actions, we call that a project. We’ve also got some other options for doable items. Dude, it’s not doable Don’t fret! The Tickler File

30 Money Sites to Check Out in 2009 - Stepcase Lifehack There are so many personal finance resources online that it’s hard to know where to start. There are blogs, web applications, news sites and more. This list is a beginning — if you take a look at the sites included here, I know you’ll find something new for 2009. Some of these sites are brand new, some are the online presence of organizations that have been around for decades. But all of them look like they’ll have great things happening in the next year: these sites have the information that we all need (no matter our current financial situation) to get a great start on 2009. Blogs Get Rich Slowly: I never fail to be impressed by the posts on GRS — this blog started as a personal financial journey, but has grown into so much more.I Will Teach You To Be Rich: While most personal finance blogs focus on cutting costs, I Will Teach You… pushes readers to increase their income, instead. Web Applications Resources Have any more websites you’d like to add?

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