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BubbleWrap Window Insulation

BubbleWrap Window Insulation
Search The Renewable Energy site for Do-It-Yourselfers Installation Cut the bubble wrap to the size of the window pane with scissors. Spray a film of water on the window using a spray bottle. If you have trouble with the bubble wrap separating from the window when the film dries, you can try adding a little Glycerin to the water, but this probably won't be necessary. A few small pieces of double back tape can be helpful on really stubborn windows. The bubblewrap can be installed in the fall, and removed in the spring. When you take the bubble wrap down, put a small number in on the upper right corner of each piece of bubble wrap, and write down which window that number goes with on a piece of paper. Some places to get bubble wrap: Suggestion from Pat: "Bubble wrap small bubble and large can be had for free by contacting furniture retailers or rental shops. (2/27/07 -- see note below on reported bubble wrap life) Installation: Click pictures to enlarge: Double Bubble (added Nov 15, 2007) Payoff Related:  ENERGIES

Cheap/Free Window Insulation Bubble glazing Whenever financial aspects take precedence - availability of resources seems to be a disincentive for progress in sustainability and conservation. When we can afford more – we simply waste more, without even admitting for consideration that Earth is a system of limited resources. The opposite direction on the other hand – aiming to improve quality of life while accepting severe limits to every resource including money – seems to be one of the greatest incentives for creativity and innovation. It is a part of human nature – we don’t even begin to invent things unless we really need them and we don’t think about ways of conserving resources unless their supply becomes limited. Bubble glazing idea emerged from a pressing need to become more comfortable in winter combined with severe budget restrictions. Double glazing is expensive, heavy and does not really represent a good value for money. For details please read the full article.

almost free garage heat – just drink a lot of soda | Hemmings Blog: Classic and collectible cars and parts I’ve had a few days during the HMX build while I’m either waiting for parts or waiting for something to dry and had some free time. I’m not exactly one to sit and watch TV when I have nothing planned, so I set out on another project. While I have electricity out to the garage now, heat has been an issue all winter long. Mattar graciously lent me his kerosene heater, which did an okay job of taking the bite off the chill. Insulating the garage would go a long way to help keep the bitter Vermont cold out, but that’s a project for another day. I started with some 2x4s and plywood to build a simple box. I actually built the box to certain dimensions, based on what scrap materials I had and on the dimensions of my heat collection method – aluminum cans. Sealed the box using adhesive caulk, just to keep any heated air from escaping the box. So you may have already thought, “How can air climb the columns of cans when there’s no hole at the bottom of the can?” The caulk is pretty strong.

Guide To Free-Energy Devices, Zero-Point Energy How To Make A Solar Heater Using some easy to find materials, soda cans being the main one, you can make this really easy and simple solar heater. Perfect for a crafty workshop, garage, shed…or anywhere that you want to get yourself free heat. Made for next to nothing it works off of the suns heat. Don’t worry about it being complicated…it’s really not at all. It’s so simple to do. To get the full tutorial visit blog.hemmings.com here… Included in this life changing eBook are: 105+ Natural Home Remedies -treat almost any illness with natural ingredients you probably already have in your kitchen. 75+ Natural Beauty Recipes - Get the best hair and skin you've ever had and look younger with these insanely clever natural beauty recipes. 35+ DIY Household Products & Cleaners - Never buy a toxic cleaning product again!

DIY Super Efficient Chest Fridge Hack Chest fridge Using vertical doors in refrigeration devices is an act against the Nature of Cold Air. Understanding and cooperating with Nature rather than acting against it leads to much better efficiency. My chest fridge (Vestfrost freezer turned into a fridge) consumes about 0.1 kWh a day. It works only about 2 minutes per hour. At all other times it is perfectly quiet and consumes no power whatsoever. It is obvious that a truly energy efficient fridge does not cost any more money than a mediocre one. So - WHY mediocre food-spoiling fridges are being made? Nearly every household on Earth has a fridge that totally wastes at least 1 kWh of energy a day (365 kWh a year). Rather than waiting for someone to do something I would like to volunteer to supply modified chest freezers and/or freezer modification kits to environmentally conscious people of Australia. Chest fridge that consumes about 0.1 kWh per day. Full article pdf | Thermostat part list

Solar Water Heating Projects and Plans Solar water heating systems have a good economic payoff, and are manageable systems to install or build as a DIY project. Some of the solar water heating designs are very simple and low cost. You can save as much as $7000 by building your own system. The projects range from simple batch heaters for warm climates through closed loop and drain back systems that will work in any climate. One of the systems is our own $1,000 solar water heating system that has provided a solar fraction in excess of 90% through our cold Montana winter. My thanks to the people who have built systems, and then taken the time to send in pictures and descriptions for others to use. Directory for this page: Information on pumps, heat exchangers, heat storage tanks Controllers, pipe insulation, backdraft dampers and other components for solar space heating systems here... Solar Water Heater kits or packages... If ya wanna be a solar pioneer, take a look at the Experimental section as well. Questions?

5 DIY Earth-Friendly Cooking Devices Capturing HEAT Five Earth-Friendly Cooking Technologies and How to Build Them By Dean Still and Jim Kness Aprovecho Research Center Illustrations by Loki Quinnangeles, Cathy White, Shon Lenzo, Lynn Forbes, Amelia Ettinger Aprovecho is a center for research, experimentation, and education on alternative technologies that are ecologically sustainable and culturally responsive. Since 1976, Aprovecho Research Center has been involved with developing energy efficient and non-polluting inventions that reflect current research but which are designed to be made in most any country. The center is largely supported by its internship program. Additional copies of this book are available for $7 postpaid from: Aprovecho Research Center, 80574 Hazelton Road, Cottage Grove, Oregon 97424, (541) 942-8198. Capturing 2nd Edition - Newly revised and updated. Contents: 4 Saving Biomass Resources Worldwide 7 MARIA TELKES SOLAR COOKER 8 How to Design a Powerful Solar Cooker 20 How to Build the Rocket Stove Introduction

How to Solar Power Your Home (Amazing Tutorial) Image – © Elenathewise – fotolia.com Here’s a brilliant video tutorial on solar power installation that we had to share. The video is below our introduction to the topic. Our modern technology has ushered an era where living in homes conveniently powered by solar energy is not anymore a far-fetched or for-millionaires-only dream. With the advent of cheaper and more readily available solar technology, homeowners across the globe have started to realize what the sun’s energy can do for them and their household living. Off-grid systems have no connection to the power company, are independent of the utility grid, and incorporate batteries to the system to furnish energy storage in times of low input (when the sun is not shining!) So, which is better? Ok here’s the video: Please Share This Page:

Fabricating a Heavy-Duty Rocket Stove Rocket stoves are small efficient stoves that can produce a hot flame with only a few small pieces of wood. The reason it is called a rocket stove is because when wood is added to the fire the flames create an internal draft. As the draft is created, the fire begins to produce a jet of fire coming through the stove pipe. The stove flame eventually becomes so hot that it produces very little smoke. The stove should be able to produce a hot continuous flame that will lick the bottom surface of a pot or pan placed on top of the stove. These stoves were created out of necessity in third world countries to cook small meals and have recently become more popular as a do-it-yourself camping stove. DIY fire making

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