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History: Abolition

History: Abolition
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Civil Rights Movement: "Black Power" Era The impressive March on Washington in the summer of 1963 has been remembered as one of the great successes of the Civil Rights Movement, a glorious high point in which a quarter of a million people—black and white—gathered at the nation's capital to demonstrate for "freedom now." But for many African Americans, especially those living in inner-city ghettos who discovered that nonviolent boycotts and sit-ins did little to alter their daily lives, the great march of 1963 marked only the first stage of a new, more radical phase of the Civil Rights Movement. You probably just finished reading the first chapter of the Civil Rights Movement. (Hint, hint.) Isn't it incredible how much had been accomplished by civil rights activists from World War II to the 1963 March on Washington? Isn't it staggering just how much had been sacrificed, how high the stakes had been raised, and how widespread the movement had become? Let's quickly review some highlights. How can this be? Not exactly.

Legacies of British Slave-ownership Legacies of British Slave-ownership is the umbrella for two projects based at UCL tracing the impact of slave-ownership on the formation of modern Britain: the ESRC-funded Legacies of British Slave-ownership project, now complete, and the ESRC and AHRC-funded Structure and significance of British Caribbean slave-ownership 1763-1833, running from 2013-2015. Colonial slavery shaped modern Britain and we all still live with its legacies. The slave-owners were one very important means by which the fruits of slavery were transmitted to metropolitan Britain. We believe that research and analysis of this group are key to understanding the extent and the limits of slavery's role in shaping British history and leaving lasting legacies that reach into the present. Full Project Overview Britain's forgotten slave-owners: BBC TV broadcast We've been consulting with the BBC on two new TV programmes entitled Britain's Forgotten Slave-owners. Full Details LBS Workshops 2015 Full Details LBS Project Book

Slavery in America The History of Slavery in America From the beginnings of slavery in British North America around 1619, when a Dutch ship brought 20 enslaved Africans to the Virginia colony at Jamestown, nearly 240 years passed until the Thirteenth Amendment to the Constitution officially ended slavery in 1865. This section of the site is devoted to an in-depth investigation of those years from many angles; from looking at the lives and cultures of the oppressed before they were enslaved, to understanding the ways in which those enslaved survived and ultimately triumphed over the institution of slavery. The first of the original essays and lesson plans based on the latest scholarship on slavery in America is offered below. If you are interested in contributing to the Slaveryinamerica.org Web site, please join us. History Essays: Scholars and historians contribute original essays on the latest scholarship regarding the issues and events in the history of slavery in America. Creating Slavery Surviving Slavery

Lady Jane Grey: The Nine Day Queen The secret history of women's football - BBC Newsbeat Maps of London's bus journeys Photo by Dan Kitwood/Getty Images This article originally appeared in Business Insider. In 2013, Londoners took 2.4 billion bus journeys. They were prescribed 116 million items by doctors, and found themselves joined by more than 1,750,000 American tourists. Meanwhile, in one small, financial corner of the capital, the population, in every 24-hour period of the year, spiked from 222 residents to more than 127,000. These staggering statistics are the work of geographer James Cheshire and visual artist Oliver Uberti, who have merged to create a new series of maps depicting London as "the most data-heavy capital in the world." The maps and infographics are as diverse as the information they cover—highlighting, for example, the 2,580 mobile phones left in a single year at Heathrow Airport, and charting the 1.1 million phone calls the emergency services took in 2013. "Almost every journey taken in London leaves a digital trace in its wake," explain Cheshire and Uberti on their website.

How Thatcher gave Pol Pot a hand On 17 April, it is 25 years since Pol Pot's Khmer Rouge entered Phnom Penh. In the calendar of fanaticism, this was Year Zero; as many as two million people, a fifth of Cambodia's population, were to die as a consequence. To mark the anniversary, the evil of Pol Pot will be recalled, almost as a ritual act for voyeurs of the politically dark and inexplicable. Declassified United States government documents leave little doubt that the secret and illegal bombing of then neutral Cambodia by President Richard Nixon and Henry Kissinger between 1969 and 1973 caused such widespread death and devastation that it was critical in Pol Pot's drive for power. After two and a half years in power, the Khmer Rouge was overthrown by the Vietnamese on Christmas Day, 1978. To this end, the United Nations was abused by the powerful. In fact, the US had been secretly funding Pol Pot in exile since January 1980. I witnessed this. Until 1989, the British role in Cambodia remained secret.

BBC iWonder - Are you a Roundhead or a Cavalier? UK Data Archive - OUR DATA IN USE About the data The UK National Food Survey collects weekly data on household food acquisition every year. It contains year and month specific information about all food entering the household using a diary reporting quantities and expenditures of food purchased. How the data were used Twenty-six waves of the National Food Survey were used for a PhD research on 'Nutrition, Health and Socio-Economic Status' documenting how diet changed in Britain between 1975 and 2000. About the author Paola De Agostini is a senior research officer at the University of Essex whose main areas of research are applied microeconometrics and health economics. To view and download the data GO TO UK DATA SERVICE <div class="noscript" style="clear: both;"><p><strong>Please enable JavaScript</strong><br />The UK Data Archive website is intended to be viewed with JavaScript enabled, although every effort has been made to ensure our content is accessible regardless of your JavaScript settings.

Map of London Social and Functional Analysis 1943 | Mapping London [Updated] This map of London districts, was intended to be used as a grand “masterplan” of how a post-WW2 London could look. Each district appears as a simplified “blob” with rounded edges – many districts are simple ovals. Specific single “University”, “Government”, “Press” and “Law” districts are all defined. Blue dots mark out the main shopping streets, with town halls marked with larger red dots. The accompanying text reads: A simplification of the communities & open space survey showing the existing main elements of London. Thankfully London has not ended up as ordered and prescribed – and obsolescent – as this map suggests. [Update – Thanks to Andrea Marchesetti for mentioning the below related map, from around the same time and with the same general idea, except with more precise boundaries drawn around the communities.] See more maps featured on Mapping London

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