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History - Historic Figures: George Orwell (1903 - 1950)

History - Historic Figures: George Orwell (1903 - 1950)

http://www.bbc.co.uk/history/historic_figures/orwell_george.shtml

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George Orwell - Author, Journalist George Orwell was an English novelist, essayist, and critic most famous for his novels Animal Farm (1945) and Nineteen Eighty-four (1949). Synopsis Born Eric Arthur Blair in Motihari, Bengal, India, in 1903, George Orwell, novelist, essayist and critic, went on to become best known for his novels Animal Farm and Nineteen Eighty-Four. Early Life

British author George Orwell, pseudonym of Eric Arthur Blair (born June 25, 1903, Motihari, Bengal, India—died January 21, 1950, London, England), English novelist, essayist, and critic famous for his novels Animal Farm (1945) and Nineteen Eighty-four (1949), the latter a profound anti-utopian novel that examines the dangers of totalitarian rule. Born Eric Arthur Blair, Orwell never entirely abandoned his original name, but his first book, Down and Out in Paris and London, appeared in 1933 as the work of George Orwell (the surname he derived from the beautiful River Orwell in East Anglia). In time his nom de plume became so closely attached to him that few people but relatives knew his real name was Blair. 1917: The Russian Revolution 100 GREAT STORIES reported, investigated, written, produced, filmed, edited, photographed, anchored, and/or tweeted by columbia journalists We compiled this collection by culling the school’s archives, researching the recipients of a wide array of journalism prizes, consulting with colleagues and scouring some of the best journalism ever produced. In fall 2011, we enlisted our faculty and a group of distinguished judges to vote for their favorites on the first installment of 50 Great Stories.

George Orwell - Author, Journalist George Orwell was an English novelist, essayist, and critic most famous for his novels Animal Farm (1945) and Nineteen Eighty-four (1949). Synopsis Born Eric Arthur Blair in Motihari, Bengal, India, in 1903, George Orwell, novelist, essayist and critic, went on to become best known for his novels Animal Farm and Nineteen Eighty-Four. Early Life Born Eric Arthur Blair, George Orwell created some of the sharpest satirical fiction of the 20th century with such works as Animal Farm and Nineteen Eighty-Four. He was a man of strong opinions who addressed some of the major political movements of his times, including imperialism, fascism and communism.

Crazy Medieval Medical Practices We Still Use Medieval times were dark and without reason, or at least that’s what we’re taught to think. But contrary to this popular belief, many of our common medical practices have roots in this period. Of course the treatments have been refined and the instruments standardized, but many practices are relatively unchanged. So if you’ve ever wondered about the origins of modern medical procedures, check out our list of amazing ones from the Middle Ages which we still use today: #1 Bloodletting A.K.A Phlebotomy We’re all shocked and disgusted when we hear about medieval bloodletting, but this seemingly crazy practice is still used today. Animal Farm Themes Animal Farm is a satire of totalitarian governments in their many guises. But Orwell composed the book for a more specific purpose: to serve as a cautionary tale about Stalinism. It was for this reason that he faced such difficulty in getting the book published; by the time Animal Farm was ready to meet its readers, the Allies were cooperating with the Soviet Union. The allegorical characters of the novel represent specific historical figures and different factions of Imperial Russian and Soviet society. These include Karl Marx (Major), Vladimir Lenin (Major), Leon Trotsky (Snowball), Joseph Stalin (Napoleon), Adolf Hitler (Frederick), the Allies (Pilkington), the peasants (Boxer), the elite (Mollie), and the church (Moses). The resemblance of some of the novel’s events to events in Soviet history is indubitable.

Christopher Hitchens on George Orwell’s Political Mind George Orwell’s best-known work (Animal Farm, Nineteen Eighty-Four) emerged from painstaking investigation. In the introduction to a groundbreaking volume of Orwell’s diaries, V.F.’s late columnist dissects one of the 20th century’s greatest political minds, a writer who was also his lifelong inspiration At various points in his essays—notably in “Why I Write” but also in his popular column “As I Please”—George Orwell gave us an account of what made him tick, as it were, and of what supplied the motive for his work. At different times he instanced what he called his “power of facing unpleasant facts”; his love for the natural world, “growing things,” and the annual replenishment of the seasons; and his desire to forward the cause of democratic socialism and oppose the menace of Fascism. The diaries are not by any means a “straight” guide, or a trove of clues and cross-references. From this period also dates some of Orwell’s best and most mordant egalitarianism.

Russian Revolution The February Revolution (known as such because of Russia’s use of the Julian calendar until February 1918) began on March 8, 1917 (or February 23 on the Julian calendar), when demonstrators clamoring for bread took to the streets in the Russian capital of Petrograd (now called St. Petersburg). Supported by huge crowds of striking industrial workers, the protesters clashed with police but refused to leave the streets. On March 10, the strike spread among all of Petrograd’s workers, and irate mobs destroyed police stations. Several factories elected deputies to the Petrograd Soviet, or council, of workers’ committees, following the model devised during the 1905 revolution. On March 11, the troops of the Petrograd army garrison were called out to quell the uprising.

George Orwell (Author of 1984) Eric Arthur Blair, better known by his pen name George Orwell, was an English author and journalist. His work is marked by keen intelligence and wit, a profound awareness of social injustice, an intense opposition to totalitarianism, a passion for clarity in language, and a belief in democratic socialism. In addition to his literary career Orwell served as a a police officer with the Indian Imperial Police in Burma from 1922-1927 and fought with the Republicans in the Spanish Civil War from 1936-1937.

The King's Speech: the real story This became a mutual love the day after a Luftwaffe bomb landed on Buckingham Palace. 'I’m glad we’ve been bombed,’ Queen Elizabeth said memorably. 'Now we can look the East End in the face.’ John Boorman’s autobiographical film Hope and Glory, about growing up in London during the Blitz, captures this relationship well. George Orwell Eric Arthur Blair (25 June 1903 – 21 January 1950),[1] known by his pen name George Orwell, was an English novelist, essayist, journalist and critic. His work is marked by lucid prose, awareness of social injustice, opposition to totalitarianism, and commitment to democratic socialism.[2][3] Commonly ranked as one of the most influential English writers of the 20th century and as one of the most important chroniclers of English culture of his generation,[4] Orwell wrote literary criticism, poetry, fiction and polemical journalism.

George Orwell Timeline of Important Dates How It All Went Down Jun 25, 1903 George Orwell Born Eric Arthur Blair—later known as George Orwell—is born in Motihari, Bengal, a British colony in what is now India. His father, Richard Walmesley Blair, works in the Indian Civil Service overseeing opium exports to Asia. Young Orwell Moves to England

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