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A Quick Guide on Blooms Taxonomy Apps for iPad

A Quick Guide on Blooms Taxonomy Apps for iPad
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Apple Will Now Let Any Teacher Publish Content to iTunes U - Liz Gannes - Mobile Apple is upping its bid for its hot-selling iPad to be a teaching device, with an update today to its iTunes U app that allows any teacher to create a private course. The new features, aimed at K-12 teachers who use iPads in the classroom, allow teachers to create up to 12 private courses. Within each course, teachers can point students to curriculum across lots of different (mostly Apple-powered) media such as iBooks, textbooks, apps, videos and Pages and Keynote documents. The new iTunes U also includes a tool for students to take timestamped notes inside a video. Previously, teachers had to go through a verification process to add their lectures to Apple’s repository — which over the past six years has accumulated 500,000 audio and video files from 1,000 universities, with 700 million total downloads. The dedicated iTunes U app is just six months old; it has been downloaded 14 million times.

Study Vibe - How to study - study skills for primary and high school students Collecting Student Work in an iPad Classroom There are many ways to go about collecting work from students but this is one method that works very effectively. ** Submitting work with a Printopia Virtual Printer If you haven't checked out the blog post on Printopia, it's worth a read. You'll find it here... Printopia installs on your Mac. It's an invaluable, simple and effective way to collect work from students. It's so easy to setup virtual printers that you can just set up a new folder and virtual printer every time you need students to submit work and keep all the submissions organized. ** Returning work with Evernote There are many ways to return the work. Note that you can also use Evernote for the entire process by designating a shared folder in your Evernote account and having the students submit the work that way. Sam Gliksman samgliksman@gmail.com

SOLO taxonomy I am pleased to say that John Biggs himself has endorsed this representation of his ideas; "I've just found your website on SOLO et al. via google. I'm delighted! Your diagrams of prestructural-extended abstract are very elegant..." (Unsolicited email, 29 May 2005) The SOLO taxonomy stands for: Structure of Observed Learning Outcomes It describes level of increasing complexity in a student's understanding of a subject, through five stages, and it is claimed to be applicable to any subject area. I confess to a slight distrust of this kind of "progressive" model, which aspires inexorably to a final state. However, the emerging field of work on Threshold Concepts and Troublesome Knowledge links in very effectively with the SOLO taxonomy and offers some points about how the above issues might be addressed. There is a small but enthusiastic group of teachers using the SOLO taxonomy to structure their teaching in schools, and blogging about it.

Get Smart! Using mobile apps to improve your teaching. by Tim Walker It was only a few years ago that cell phones were being banished from classrooms. As far as school districts were concerned, these devices’ reputation as tools for student distraction, mischief, and even harassment easily outweighed any possible benefits in the learning process. Banning them was—and, in many districts, still is—the easy call to make, but as cell phones have become more sophisticated, powerful, and even more entrenched in students’ daily lives, a growing number of schools have decided to open the door to what are, essentially, mobile computers. “Educators can’t afford to be behind the 8-ball anymore,” says Mike Pennington, who teaches world history at Chardon Middle School in Chardon, Ohio, and blogs about classroom technology at Teachers for Tomorrow, a website he co-founded with colleague Garth Holman. Video: Digital Technology in the Classroom Many are free—or at least very cheap. In Ohio, Going Mobile and Loving It

Top 12 Ways to Increase Student Participation Call it "active learning," or "classroom participation" -- every teacher wants to know how to motivate students to particpate, and how to nurture more involved students and fewer apathetic ones. With a little extra planning, that is possible. Below are four common reasons students don’t participate and techniques to solve those problems and spice up your lessons. Problem: The content is repetitive. Maybe it needs to be repetitive because the students don’t really “get it,” or maybe you’re reviewing for a test. In any case, they’re tuning out. Solution #1: Assess their prior knowledge. This could be as simple as asking students, “What do you know about (topic)?” Technology in the classroom tools that keep parents informed about classroom... To kick off this holiday week, we want to spread a little Thanksgiving joy with... Teaching strategies to help guide your students through a writer’s workshop... Exciting ways to use video conferencing in your classroom. Solution #2: Try skills grouping.

iPads and iPods in Education - @Ideas_Factory The blog of Julian S. Wood This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike 3.0 Unported License. @Ideas_Factory The blog of Julian S. Wood. Privacy Policy for www.ideasfactory.me If you require any more information or have any questions about our privacy policy, please feel free to contact us by email at skyblue_jules@talk21.com. At www.ideasfactory.me, the privacy of our visitors is of extreme importance to us. Log Files Like many other Web sites, www.ideasfactory.me makes use of log files. Cookies and Web Beacons www.ideasfactory.me does not use cookies. Some of our advertising partners may use cookies and web beacons on our site. These third-party ad servers or ad networks use technology to the advertisements and links that appear on www.ideasfactory.me send directly to your browsers. www.ideasfactory.me has no access to or control over these cookies that are used by third-party advertisers. If you wish to disable cookies, you may do so through your individual browser options.

Memory Improvement Techniques - Improve Your Memory with MindToo © VeerPRZEMYSLAW PRZYBYLSKI Use these techniques to improve your memory. The tools in this section help you to improve your memory. The tools are split into two sections. As with other mind tools, the more practice you give yourself with these techniques, the more effectively you will use them. Mnemonics 'Mnemonic' is another word for memory tool. The idea behind using mnemonics is to encode difficult-to-remember information in a way that is much easier to remember. Our brains evolved to code and interpret complex stimuli such as images, colors, structures, sounds, smells, tastes, touch, positions, emotions and language. Unfortunately, a lot of the information we have to remember in modern life is presented differently – as words printed on a page. This section of Mind Tools shows you how to use all the memory resources available to you to remember information in a highly efficient way. Using Your Whole Mind to Remember You can do the following things to make your mnemonics more memorable:

An introductory guide to iPads for Teachers I’m delivering some iPad training to a school tomorrow, so thought it might be useful to collate some of the links I’ve been putting together for the session. The session is concentrating mainly on teachers using the iPads for their own professional use, rather than being used as a classroom resource, but a lot of the apps below will be suitable for use by students too. I’ll do another post sometime of great apps for different subject areas. Here’s some of the useful apps I’d recommend investigating. File storage / Transfer Dropbox Dropbox is probably one of the most useful applications I’ve used in years. Other apps also work with Dropbox too. Word Processing / Office Capability Documents to Go Microsoft have yet to release an Office app for the iPad – so there’s a need to look at alternatives. The spreadsheet would make it possible to set up grade books and student record sheets without having to buy additional gradebook applications. Note taking Also worth taking a look at these apps too :

Making Study Plan, Study Schedule A very well-known saying is, “He who fails to plan, he plans to fail”. Planning is very much important, if you want to be a successful student. A schedule helps you in utilizing your time more productively. It helps you to complete your course in a particular time. It tells you how much part of your course should be studied weekly or monthly so that you can complete your course before the exam. A schedule is made on weekly or monthly or daily basis. Count the number of subjects included in your course. Example. • Book-1 = 15 chapters = 185 topics • Book-2 = 20 chapters = 200 topics • Book-3 = 13 chapters = 145 topics • Book-4 = 16 chapters = 190 topics His entire course comprises of 185+200+145+190 = 720 Topics He has 6 month for preparation or 30x6 = 180 Days Divide total topics by total days you have for preparation, 720 topics/180 days = 4 topic/per day. After this calculation he shall make a table (having rows and column) on paper with the help of ruler and pen.

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