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Folklore

Folklore
A magic carpet - a carpet that can allegedly transport persons instantaneously or swiftly to a destination. Folklore can be divided[by whom?] into four areas of study: artifacts (such as voodoo dolls)describable and transmissible entity (oral tradition)culturebehavior (rituals) These areas do not stand alone, however, as often a particular item or element may fit into more than one of these areas.[2] Oral tradition[edit] While folklore can contain religious or mythic elements, it equally concerns itself with the sometimes mundane traditions of everyday life. Sometimes "folklore" is religious in nature, like the tales of the Welsh Mabinogion or those found in Icelandic skaldic poetry. "Folktales" is a general term for different varieties of traditional narrative. Contemporary narratives common in the Western world include the urban legend. Vladimir Propp's classic study Morphology of the Folktale (1928) became the basis of research into the structure of folklore texts. Cultural[edit] Related:  Myths & Related Articles

The Silencing: How the Left is Killing Free Speech: Kirsten Powers: 9781621573708: Amazon.com: Books Legend The Brothers Grimm defined legend as folktale historically grounded.[2] A modern folklorist's professional definition of legend was proposed by Timothy R. Tangherlini in 1990:[3] Legend, typically, is a short (mono-) episodic, traditional, highly ecotypified[4] historicized narrative performed in a conversational mode, reflecting on a psychological level a symbolic representation of folk belief and collective experiences and serving as a reaffirmation of commonly held values of the group to whose tradition it belongs." Etymology and origin[edit] Legend is a loanword from Old French that entered English usage circa 1340. In 1613, English-speaking Protestants began to use the word when they wished to imply that an event (especially the story of any saint not acknowledged in John Foxe's Actes and Monuments) was fictitious.[6] Thus, legend gained its modern connotations of "undocumented" and "spurious", which distinguish it from the meaning of chronicle. Christian legenda[edit] See also[edit]

I Tried To Become A Psychic & It Was More Revealing Than Therapy For the month of October, Bustle's #blessed series will explore how young women are searching for meaning, finding connections to a higher power and navigating spirituality in 2017. Did you wait until you were sure no one was looking over your shoulder before you clicked on this article? Are you reading this with one eye on the door, lest a partner, parent, or coworker come in, look over at your screen, raise an eyebrow, and chide, " Developing your psychic abilities, huh?" Just kidding! And as I sit in my room, practicing exercises that are supposed to help me increase my intuition and tap into my psychic abilities, I'm also practicing my poker face, so I can look calm and collected when my loved ones discover me and begin rolling their eyes once more. I want access to my intuition so I can better pursue my riskiest creative dreams, not so I can decide whether to take the express or local bus. Why is belief in any sort of psychic phenomena so taboo? Scott Rodgerson/Unsplash

Ancient Sumerians In Ecuador: The Father Crespi Mystery… | Hidden Inca Tours In the Amazonian Ecuadorian region called Morona Santiago there is a very deep cavern, known in Spanish as Cueva de los Tayos (Cave of the Oilbirds). According to some researchers the true discoverer of the huge archaeological treasures of the Cueva de los Tayos was not the Hungarian Juan Moricz, but rather the Salesian priest Carlo Crespi (1891-1982), a native of Milan, Italy. Carlo Crespi, who arrived to the Amazonian Ecuador area of Cuenca in 1927, was able to win the trust of the natives Jibaro, and so they did deliver to him, over decades, hundreds of fabulous archaeological pieces dating back to an unknown time, many of them made of gold or golden, often masterfully carved with archaic hieroglyphs that, to date, no one has been able to decipher. From 1960 Crespi obtained from the Vatican the permission to open a museum in the city of Cuenca, where was located his Salesian mission. We have 2 major tours of Peru and Bolivia left in 2014; see details below: Full details Here

Hunting and killing ninjas in Indonesia - New Mandala Editor’s note: this article contains graphic imagery. Nicholas Herriman recounts a troubling tale of sorcerer killings, ninja fear, mass hysteria and violence in East Java. Distressed students in Kelantan, Malaysia, have recently described apparitions haunting their school. The sight of these ghostly beings apparently precipitates screaming fits. Attempts to exorcise the school by various shamans and ulama(Islamic scholar-preachers) have failed. From the outside, it is easy to look sceptically, if not dismissively, at such reports. A sorcerer huntThe ‘ninja’ case had its origins in an even more violent episode—what we might call a ‘sorcerer hunt’—centred in the East Javanese district of Banyuwangi. Perceiving this ‘sorcerer’ in their midst, and unsure if the state can do anything about it, locals might form a group and kill their fellow resident. The police and army brought the killings to a halt with widespread arrests of alleged killers in October 1998.

Swedish divers unearth a 'Stone Age Atlantis': 11,000-year-old ancient settlement discovered under the Baltic Sea Divers found a harpoon, tools, horns and the bones of ancient cattle The bones belonged to the animal auroch last seen in the early 1600sArchaeologists believe these relics date back to the Stone AgeIt is said to be the oldest settlement in the area - dubbed Sweden’s 'Atlantis' By Victoria Woollaston Published: 16:06 GMT, 27 January 2014 | Updated: 17:16 GMT, 27 January 2014 Divers in Sweden have discovered a rare collection of Stone Age artefacts buried deep beneath the Baltic Sea. Archaeologists believe the relics were left by Swedish nomads 11,000 years ago and the discovery may be evidence of one of the oldest settlements ever found in the Nordic region. Some of the relics are so well preserved, reports have dubbed the find 'Sweden’s Atlantis' and suggested the settlement may have been swallowed whole by the sea in the same way as the mythical island in the Atlantic Ocean. Divers in Sweden have discovered a rare collection of Stone Age artefacts buried beneath the Baltic Sea, pictured.

The top three scientific explanations for ghost sightings From ghosts to ghouls, witches to wizards, Halloween is the one time of the year when people come together to celebrate everything supernatural. But beyond the fancy dress and trick or treating, belief in ghosts is actually relatively common – with 38% of people classifying themselves as believers and a similar number having actually reported seeing one. The term “ghost” refers to the idea that the spirits of the dead – human and animal – influence the physical world. But in a world filled with science and reason, these “hauntings” can often boil down to a very simple explanation. 1. Attempts to explain hauntings often draw upon psychological factors – such as suggestion – so being told a place is haunted is more likely to lead to ghostly goings-on. One classic study saw participants visiting five main areas of a theatre before completing a questionnaire to assess their feelings and perceptions. But research in real-world settings has produced inconsistent results. 2. 3.

Oedipus In the most well-known version of the myth, Oedipus was born to King Laius and Queen Jocasta. Laius wished to thwart a prophecy, so left him to die on a mountainside. However, the baby was found by shepherds and raised by King Polybus and Queen Merope as their own. Oedipus learned from the oracle at Delphi of the prophecy that he would end up killing his father and marrying his mother but, unaware of his true parentage, believed he was fated to murder Polybus and marry Merope, so left for Thebes. On his way he met an older man and quarrelled, and Oedipus killed the stranger. Continuing on to Thebes, he found that the king of the city (Laius) had been recently killed, and that the city was at the mercy of the Sphinx. Years later, to end a plague on Thebes, Oedipus searched to find who had killed Laius, and discovered that he himself was responsible. Basics of the myth[edit] On the way, Oedipus came to Davlia, where three roads crossed each other. 5th century BC[edit] Later additions[edit]

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