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EVALUATING CRITICAL THINKING SKILLS

EVALUATING CRITICAL THINKING SKILLS

Free Critical Thinking Worksheets Critical Thinking Worksheets Critical thinking is more than just a simple thought process. It involves thinking on a much deeper underlying level rather than just at the surface. There is so much information available to us in this world that we don't know what is true and what is not. That's why it's important for students to analyze, think effectively, and understand that not everything is black and white. Brain Teasers- A great way to stimulate thinking. Socratic Electronics Socratic Electronics by Tony R. Kuphaldt is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution 3.0 United States License. Take me to the worksheets now! Copyright © 2003 - 2009, Tony R. These worksheets and all related files are licensed under the Creative Commons Attribution 3.0 United States License. A copy of the Attribution License is included with the files. What is Socratic Electronics? We live in a world where the accumulation of knowledge is exponential over time, and where the ability to continuously learn and make sound judgments is essential to survival. The most important thing any educator can impart to a student, in any context, is the ability to teach themselves. Placing students at the center of the instructional process breaks this dependency. The purpose of this website is to provide both rationale and resources for research/discussion-based instruction to instructors everywhere. An important feature of these questions and answers is that they are configurable. News Flashes

10 Signs You're A Critical Thinker Critical thinkers are able to analyze issues from a wide variety of angles, resulting in more success in business and life. Discover your ability to think critically today with these ten signs you’re a critical thinker. 1. You get your news from a wide variety of sources. Critical thinkers know that partisan politics come into play at any mainstream media outlet, so they strive to learn about the world from a variety of sources that offer different journalistic voices. 2. Critical thinkers are not afraid of a healthy debate. 3. Critical thinkers know that it is impossible to be right about everything all the time. 4. Critical thinkers are often frustrated at the total lack of rationality that surrounds them on the Internet. 5. Critical thinkers wake up every day, excited to have another opportunity to sharpen their thinking ability. 6. Critical thinkers have an unquenchable thirst for knowledge. 7. Critical thinkers would rather innovate than regurgitate. 8. 9. 10.

How to Teach Critical Thinking Robert H. Ennis, rhennis@illinois.edu The actual teaching of critical thinking is a function of many situation-specific factors: teacher style, teacher interest, teacher knowledge and understanding, class size, cultural and community backgrounds and expectations, student expectations and backgrounds, colleagues’ expectations, recent local events, the amount of time available to teachers after they have done all the other things they have to do, and teacher grasp of critical thinking, to name some major factors. I here suggest some general strategies and tactics gleaned from years of experience, research, and others’ suggestions. They are guidelines and must be adjusted to fit the actual situation. Underlying Strategies (The three underlying strategies are “Reflection, Reasons, Alternatives” (RRA): 1. 2. 3. Fundamental Strategies 4. 5. 6. 7. 8. 9. 10. 11. 12. Tactics 13. 14. 15. 16. 17. 18. 19. 20. Mid-level Strategies 21. Be patient, but show that you are interested in their thoughts.

An Abbreviated Glossary of Critical Thinking Concepts and Terms critical thinking: Everybody thinks; it is our nature to do so. But much of our thinking left to itself, is biased, distorted, partial, uninformed, or down-right prejudiced. Shoddy thinking is costly, both in money and in quality of life. Excellence in thought through critical thinking must be systematically cultivated. A well-cultivated critical thinker: raises vital questions and problems, formulating them clearly and precisely; gathers and assesses relevant information, using abstract ideas to interpret it effectively; comes to well-reasoned conclusions and solutions, testing them against relevant criteria and standards; thinks open-mindedly within alternative systems of thought, recognizing and assessing, as need be their assumptions, implications, and consequences; and communicates effectively with others figuring out solutions to complex problems. cultural assumption: Un-assessed (often implicit) belief adopted by virtue of enculturation. s, community or nation.

List of thought processes Nature of thought[edit] Thought (or thinking) can be described as all of the following: An activity taking place in a: brain – organ that serves as the center of the nervous system in all vertebrate and most invertebrate animals (only a few invertebrates such as sponges, jellyfish, adult sea squirts and starfish do not have a brain). Types of thoughts[edit] Content of thoughts[edit] Types of thought (thinking)[edit] Listed below are types of thought, also known as thinking processes. Animal thought[edit] See Animal cognition Human thought[edit] Human thought Classifications of thought[edit] Williams' Taxonomy Creative processes[edit] Creative processes – Decision-making[edit] Decision-making Erroneous thinking[edit] see Error for some examples, see also Human error) Emotional intelligence (emotionally based thinking)[edit] Emotional intelligence – Problem solving[edit] Problem solving Reasoning[edit] Reasoning – Machine thought[edit] Machine thought (outline) Organizational thought[edit] Organizations[edit] Lists

untitled untitled untitled Outline of thought Nature of thought[edit] Thought (or thinking) can be described as all of the following: An activity taking place in a: brain – organ that serves as the center of the nervous system in all vertebrate and most invertebrate animals (only a few invertebrates such as sponges, jellyfish, adult sea squirts and starfish do not have a brain). It is the physical structure associated with the mind. mind – abstract entity with the cognitive faculties of consciousness, perception, thinking, judgement, and memory. Having a mind is a characteristic of humans, but which also may apply to other life forms.[1][2] Activities taking place in a mind are called mental processes or cognitive functions.computer (see automated reasoning, below) – general purpose device that can be programmed to carry out a set of arithmetic or logical operations automatically. Types of thoughts[edit] Content of thoughts[edit] Types of thought (thinking)[edit] Listed below are types of thought, also known as thinking processes. Lists

Thinking Tools, Graphic Organisers & Templates This graphic organizer is a great tool for students struggling to make a logical decision. It encourages them to look at the pro's and cons and explore alternatives which they might not ordinarily consider. Download it here. Dan Ackland submitted this lesson plan and earned cash for it. *Please note all of our documents are originally designed using high resolution images and fonts at A3 paper size. Be aware it will be automatically resized to your default paper size when using Adobe Acrobat Reader without any loss of quality. We recommend laminating them for best results. Finally if you would like to purchase a completely editable version of this document to alter without any restrictions you can purchase it for $10.00 simply by emailing us.

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