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Your Source for Norse Mythology and Vikings

Your Source for Norse Mythology and Vikings
Related:  Norse mythology

Norse Mythology for Smart People - The Ultimate Online Resource for Norse Mythology and ReligionNorse Mythology for Smart People | The Ultimate Online Resource for Norse Mythology and Religion Norse Mythology - the gods of the Vikings Introduction The red-blooded, rip-roaring, gung-ho Gods beloved by the Vikings. We could have listed them as Nordic, but 'Norse' sounds like the snorting of a giant battle stallion so we went for that. Their idea of Heaven was VALHALLA. Warriors only. "Bjorn, when you took my head off with that double-headed axe — just fantastic! So welcome to the Norse pantheon, which is not just Norway but the rest of Scandinavia — which includes Denmark and Sweden. Something which helped enormously was that all these people spoke the same Norse language, and would have known their own Kingdoms under the names of Danmark, Vastergotland, Ostergotland and Svealand. Colonies and footholds were established all over the place, from Greenland to England - where their heritage includes Norfolk and Humberside with many Norse-named villages in between. Thanks to the richness of its legends, as told in the Eddas and a host of poetic sagas, Norse Mythology is as popular as ever. The Gods told us to do it.

Berserker Berserkers (or berserks) were Norse warriors who are primarily reported in the Old Norse literature to have fought in a nearly uncontrollable, trance-like fury, a characteristic which later gave rise to the English word berserk. Berserkers are attested to in numerous Old Norse sources. Most historians believe that berserkers worked themselves into a rage before battle, but some think that they might have consumed drugged foods. The Úlfhéðnar (singular Úlfheðinn), another term associated with berserkers, mentioned in the Vatnsdœla saga, Haraldskvæði and the Völsunga saga, were said to wear the pelt of a wolf when they entered battle.[1] Úlfhéðnar are sometimes described as Odin's special warriors: "[Odin’s] men went without their mailcoats and were mad as hounds or wolves, bit their shields...they slew men, but neither fire nor iron had effect upon them. Etymology[edit] The name berserker derives from the Old Norse berserkr (plural berserkir). Terminology[edit] Attestations[edit]

Germanic Myths, Legends, and Sagas Compiled by D. L. See also Folklore and Mythology Electronic Texts Germanic Geography The Germanic world. Germanic (Especially Old Norse) Mythology and Culture Ancient Monuments Dolmens in Denmark, a collection of photographs of pre-Christian stone graves and monuments.Runestones and Picture Stones from Scandinavia: A Selection of Photographs.The Sigurd Portal. The Gods' Home Pages Balder's Home Page.Frey's Home Page. The Vikings Vikings in America. Electronic texts Index of Folklore and Mythology Electronic Texts, compiled by D. Germanic Mythology and Culture Nordic Mythology, a summary essay from Sweden. Mythology and legendry in general Encyclopedia Mythica, edited by M. Fairy mythology The Yahoo index Society and Culture:Mythology and Folklore:Fabulous Creatures:Faeries. Folk and fairy tales Folk and fairy tale links, edited by D. Return to the top of this document Tabulation by WebCounter.

Frigg | Norse Mythology “Frigga Spinning the Clouds” by John Charles Dollman (1909) Frigg (pronounced “FRIG;” Old Norse Frigg, “Beloved”[1]), sometimes Anglicized as “Frigga,” is the highest-ranking of the Aesir goddesses. She’s the wife of Odin, the chief of the gods, and the mother of Baldur. Strangely for a goddess of her high position, the surviving primary sources on Norse mythology give only sparse and casual accounts of anything related to her personality, deeds, or other attributes. Frigg and Freya Like Freya, Frigg is depicted as a völva, a Viking Age practitioner of the form of Norse magic known as seidr. In the Viking Age, the völva was an itinerant seeress and sorceress who traveled from town to town performing commissioned acts of seidr in exchange for lodging, food, and often other forms of compensation as well. Thus, in the Migration Period, the goddess who later became Freya (and Frigg) was the wife of the god who later became Odin. Clearly, then, the two are ultimately the same goddess.

Germanic Mythology: Texts, Translations, Scholarship The Norse Mythology Blog Norse and German Mythology Myth is the foundation of life; it is the timeless pattern, the religious formula to which life shapes itself…Whereas in the life of mankind the mythical represents an early and primitive stage, in the life of an individual it represents a late and mature one. -- Thomas Mann The following list came from a dozen or so sources, including translations of the Eddas. Where applicable comparisons with Greek and Roman deities appear. For a brief discussion of gods and archetypes see my Celtic Deities page. Dedication: to my ancestors: my foremothers and forefathers who danced like furies, lived close to Earth, and held back the night in Britain, France, Germania, Holland, Scandinavia, Spain, Ireland, and Scotland. Aegir ("AY-ear"): the Norse sea god, master brewer of storms, and husband to Ran, with whom he had nine daughters who personify as waves. Axe-time, sword-time, shields are sundered, Wind-time, wolf-time, ere the world falls; Nor ever shall men each other spare....

The Viking-age Fylki (Petty kingdoms) of Norway Important! This is the “de jure” regions so to say. A petty king might have power in 2 or 3 of them, or they might be divided in various ways. The fylki are mostly a kind of administrative grouping, and they survived into the time of medieval Norway and beyond. The fylki had in the beginning mostly a þing each, but some went for further cooperation made bigger multi-fylki þings, which I have tried to represent here. For example Trøndelag. In the middle ages, all fylki eventually joined such a big thing and in the end there were 4 big ones covering all of Norway. Also, in this time Hálogaland, Jamtaland and similar areas are not to be considered the same as fylki. Sources: Mostly the writings of SnorriThe medieval manuscripts dealing with the fylki of that time. Apologies to Hälsingland, which I can not say are suitably represented on this map due to my limited knowledge.

Germanic mythology Thor or Donar, god of thunder, one of the major figures in Germanic mythology. Germanic mythology is a comprehensive term for myths associated with historical Germanic paganism, including Norse mythology, Anglo-Saxon mythology, Continental Germanic mythology, and other versions of the mythologies of the Germanic peoples. Germanic mythology ultimately derives from Indo-European mythology, also known as Indo-Germanic mythology. Gods of Asgard Dimension of Origin: Unrevealed, possibly AsgardHabitat: TemperateGravity: Earth-likeAtmosphere: Earth-likePopulation: 500-800 (estimated)Other Associated Dimensions: The Asgardian dimension is a cosmology of inter-connected worlds of which inhabit the other known races of the Asgardian gods. Among these are Asgard (home of the gods), Vanaheim (former home of the Vanir), Alfheim (home of elves), Nidavellir (home of dwarves), Jotunheim (home of the Jotuns or giants), Svartlheim (home of the dark elves), Hel (the land of the dead) and Niffleheim (the frozen land reserved for the dishonored dead). Among these realms is Midgard, the Norse name for Earth. The Gods of Asgard are a race of superhumanly powerful humanoid beings who were once worshipped by the ancient Norse and German tribes of Western and Northern Europe between 1100 BC to 1200 AD. The precise origin of the Asgardian gods, like that of all of Earth's pantheons of gods, is shrouded in legend. ==Characteristics== ==Powers==

Norse mythology An undead völva, a Scandinavian seeress, tells the spear-wielding god Odin of what has been and what will be in Odin and the Völva by Lorenz Frølich (1895) For the practices and social institutions of the Norse pagans, see Norse paganism Norse mythology, or Scandinavian mythology, is the body of mythology of the North Germanic people stemming from Norse paganism and continuing after the Christianization of Scandinavia and into the Scandinavian folklore of the modern period. The northernmost extension of Germanic mythology, Norse mythology consists of tales of various deities, beings, and heroes derived from numerous sources from both before and after the pagan period, including medieval manuscripts, archaeological representations, and folk tradition. Most of the surviving mythology centers on the plights of the gods and their interaction with various other beings, such as humanity and the jötnar, beings who may be friends, lovers, foes and/or family members of the gods. Sources[edit]

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