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Using Hardware Devices

Using Hardware Devices
When building a mobile application, it's important that you always test your application on a real device before releasing it to users. This page describes how to set up your development environment and Android-powered device for testing and debugging on the device. You can use any Android-powered device as an environment for running, debugging, and testing your applications. The tools included in the SDK make it easy to install and run your application on the device each time you compile. You can install your application on the device directly from Eclipse or from the command line with ADB. If you don't yet have a device, check with the service providers in your area to determine which Android-powered devices are available. If you want a SIM-unlocked phone, then you might consider a Nexus phone. Note: When developing on a device, keep in mind that you should still use the Android emulator to test your application on configurations that are not equivalent to those of your real device.

http://developer.android.com/tools/device.html

Related:  Android Development

Configuring Virtual Machine Acceleration The Android SDK includes a virtual mobile device emulator that runs on your computer. The emulator lets you prototype, develop and test Android applications without using a physical device. The Android emulator mimics all of the hardware and software features of a typical mobile device, except that it cannot place actual phone calls. It provides a variety of navigation and control keys, which you can "press" using your mouse or keyboard to generate events for your application. It also provides a screen in which your application is displayed, together with any other active Android applications.

Ubuntu - Automount Nexus 7 in MTP mode Created on 12 Oct 2012, updated on 14 Aug 2013, by Nicolas Bernaerts Google USB Driver Before downloading the Google USB Driver, you must agree to the following terms and conditions. This is the Android Software Development Kit License Agreement 1. Introduction 1.1 The Android Software Development Kit (referred to in this License Agreement as the "SDK" and specifically including the Android system files, packaged APIs, and Google APIs add-ons) is licensed to you subject to the terms of this License Agreement. This License Agreement forms a legally binding contract between you and Google in relation to your use of the SDK. 1.2 "Android" means the Android software stack for devices, as made available under the Android Open Source Project, which is located at the following URL: as updated from time to time. 1.3 "Google" means Google Inc., a Delaware corporation with principal place of business at 1600 Amphitheatre Parkway, Mountain View, CA 94043, United States.

Reading and Writing Logs The Android logging system provides a mechanism for collecting and viewing system debug output. Logcat dumps a log of system messages, which include things such as stack traces when the emulator throws an error and messages that you have written from your application by using the Log class. You can run LogCat through ADB or from DDMS, which allows you to read the messages in real time. The Log class Log is a logging class that you can utilize in your code to print out messages to the LogCat. Common logging methods include: OEM USB Drivers If you are developing on Windows and would like to connect an Android-powered device to test your applications, then you need to install the appropriate USB driver. This document provides links to the web sites for several original equipment manufacturers (OEMs), where you can download the appropriate USB driver for your device. However, this list is not exhaustive for all available Android-powered devices.

OEM USB Drivers If you are developing on Windows and would like to connect an Android-powered device to test your applications, then you need to install the appropriate USB driver. This document provides links to the web sites for several original equipment manufacturers (OEMs), where you can download the appropriate USB driver for your device. However, this list is not exhaustive for all available Android-powered devices. If you're developing on Mac OS X or Linux, then you probably don't need to install a USB driver. [How to] Connect your Android Ice Cream Sandwich Phone to Ubuntu for File Access The Galaxy Nexus – such a great phone, and one that wows anyone who uses it. But there is one area in which the phone falls short: getting it hooked up to my Ubuntu laptop. A simpler version of this guide can be found here.

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