background preloader

Mindfulness and Neural Integration: Daniel Siegel, MD at TEDxStudioCityED

Mindfulness and Neural Integration: Daniel Siegel, MD at TEDxStudioCityED

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=LiyaSr5aeho

Related:  Dan Siegelsprater44Mind

Dr. Dan Siegel - Books - Mindsight Mindsight: The New Science of Personal Transformation (Random House 2010) A groundbreaking book on the healing power of "mindsight," the potent skill that is the basis for both emotional and social intelligence. Mindsight allows you to make positive changes in your brain–and in your life. Is there a memory that torments you, or an irrational fear you can't shake?

Bringing mindfulness to the school curriculum Photograph by Cole Garside Aliza Naqvi, a 14-year-old student at Dr. Norman Bethune Collegiate Institute in Toronto, carries a key chain strung with seven coloured beads. When she’s feeling stressed or anxious, she can pull it out as a reminder: The first bead, which is blue, stands for “breathe.” The second, red, cues her to reflect on her thoughts; yellow is to consider her emotions, and so on. 5 Creepy Forms of Mind Control You're Exposed to Daily One of our favorite subjects is the way marketers can use psychology to manipulate you into doing what they want (we don't think "brainwashing" is too strong a word). We know what you're thinking: You're far too cynical to fall for the ads you fast forward through on your DVR or the little tricks employed by marketers and politicians to push your subconscious buttons. But are you sure? Because science has found ... #5. The Color of a Pill Can Trick You into Thinking It's Working

Mindfulness For Kids: Why We Should Be Encouraging Young People To Find Inner Peace Once upon a time mindfulness was reserved for spiritual types sitting cross-legged on the tops of faraway mountains, but these days the mind-calming practice has well and truly gone mainstream. Now, everyone is doing it, from comedian and HuffPost UK blogger Ruby Wax to high-flying bankers ditching the city for a life of peace. But what exactly is it? Mindfulness is a therapeutic technique that involves focusing on the present moment while acknowledging and accepting feelings and thoughts - whether positive or negative. While the practice is certainly helping adults deal with negative tendencies such stress, self-doubt and anxiety, many believe that principles could also be hugely beneficial if used for children and teenagers. A series of research papers quoted by Katherine Weare , Emeritus Professor, Universities of Exeter and Southampton, show that regular practice not only helps young people deal with strong emotions, but increases concentration and improves performance at school.

Four Arguments for the Elimination of Television Four Arguments for the Elimination of Television (1978) is a book by Jerry Mander, who argues that many of the problems with television are inherent in the medium and technology itself, and thus cannot be reformed. Mander spent 15 years in the advertising business, including five as president and partner of Freeman, Mander & Gossage, San Francisco, a nationally-known advertising agency.[1] Summary[edit] Four Arguments for the Elimination of Television argues that the technology of television is not a neutral or benign instrument or tool.

Mindfulness at work: what are the benefits? Practising mindfulness can help you to deal with difficult situations in the workplace. Photograph: Alamy Mindfulness. Everybody's doing it. From Google to the NHS and Transport for London. Philosophy of mind A phrenological mapping[1] of the brain – phrenology was among the first attempts to correlate mental functions with specific parts of the brain Philosophy of mind is a branch of philosophy that studies the nature of the mind, mental events, mental functions, mental properties, consciousness, and their relationship to the physical body, particularly the brain. The mind–body problem, i.e. the relationship of the mind to the body, is commonly seen as one key issue in philosophy of mind, although there are other issues concerning the nature of the mind that do not involve its relation to the physical body, such as how consciousness is possible and the nature of particular mental states.[2][3][4] Mind–body problem[edit]

Dr. Dan Siegel Join Dr. Dan Siegel at the Garrison Institute April 25th through April 27th, 2014, as he explores the integration of science and spirituality. Soul and Synapse - The Integration of Science and Spirituality Harvard Yoga Scientists Find Proof of Meditation Benefit Scientists are getting close to proving what yogis have held to be true for centuries -- yoga and meditation can ward off stress and disease. John Denninger, a psychiatrist at Harvard Medical School, is leading a five-year study on how the ancient practices affect genes and brain activity in the chronically stressed. His latest work follows a study he and others published earlier this year showing how so-called mind-body techniques can switch on and off some genes linked to stress and immune function. While hundreds of studies have been conducted on the mental health benefits of yoga and meditation, they have tended to rely on blunt tools like participant questionnaires, as well as heart rate and blood pressure monitoring. Only recently have neuro-imaging and genomics technology used in Denninger’s latest studies allowed scientists to measure physiological changes in greater detail.

Integral theory consciousness Ken Wilber Journal of Consciousness Studies, 4 (1), February 1997, pp. 71-92 Copyright, 1997, Imprint Academic Abstract: An extensive data search among various types of developmental and evolutionary sequences yielded a `four quadrant' model of consciousness and its development (the four quadrants being intentional, behavioural, cultural, and social). Each of these dimensions was found to unfold in a sequence of at least a dozen major stages or levels. Combining the four quadrants with the dozen or so major levels in each quadrant yields an integral theory of consciousness that is quite comprehensive in its nature and scope. This model is used to indicate how a general synthesis and integration of twelve of the most influential schools of consciousness studies can be effected, and to highlight some of the most significant areas of future research.

Related: