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Medical Dictionary definitions of popular medical terms easily defined on MedTerms

Medical Dictionary definitions of popular medical terms easily defined on MedTerms
MedTerms medical dictionary is the medical reference for MedicineNet.com. Our doctors define difficult medical language in easy-to-understand explanations of over 16,000 medical terms. Medterms online medical dictionary provides quick access to hard-to-spell and often misspelled medical definitions through an extensive alphabetical listing. Explore MedTerms Medical Dictionary by Letter: If you know the spelling, use the search function above to look up the meaning of the medical term in MedTerms and find related medical articles on MedicineNet.com. If you're not sure of the spelling (medical misspellings are common), type the first few letters, followed by an asterisk(*). Word of the Day Tuberculosis: A highly contagious infection caused by the bacterium called Mycobacterium tuberculosis. Health News of the Week New & Updated A Note to Healthcare Professionals: The MedTerms online medical dictionary is written with consumers and patients in mind.

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BMI (body mass index) A graph of body mass index as a function of body mass and body height is shown above. The dashed lines represent subdivisions within a major class. For instance the "Underweight" classification is further divided into "severe", "moderate", and "mild" subclasses.[1] The body mass index (BMI), or Quetelet index, is a measure for human body shape based on an individual's mass and height. Devised between 1830 and 1850 by the Belgian polymath Adolphe Quetelet during the course of developing "social physics",[2] it is defined as the individual's body mass divided by the square of their height – with the value universally being given in units of kg/m2.

Writing in Nursing Writing as a Professional Nurse Summary: These resources will help you write on the job and in the classes you will take to become a nurse. Dictionary Whether you're looking for an obscure phrase or your basic marketing definition, the AMA Dictionary has it all! Originating from the print version in 1995, we're always adding new terms to keep marketers up to date in the ever-evolving marketing profession. Browse terms related to - A.

HyperGrammar Welcome to HyperGrammar electronic grammar course at the University of Ottawa's Writing Centre. This course covers approximately the same ground as our English department's ENG 1320 Grammar course. The content of HyperGrammar is the result of the collaborative work of the four instructors who were teaching the course in Fall 1993: Heather MacFadyen, David Megginson, Frances Peck, and Dorothy Turner. David Megginson was then responsible for editing the grammar and exercises and for converting them to SGML. This package is designed to allow users a great deal of freedom and creativity as they read about grammar. HyperGrammar allows users to create and follow their own lines of thought.

AAHA Guidelines OTHER SITES: Career Center | DEVTP | JAAHA | NEWStat | Microchip Lookup | My Veterinary Career | Pet Owners | Students | Yearly Conference Search: More search options BVI (body volume index) The Body Volume Index (BVI) is a new measurement for obesity, proposed as an alternative to the Body Mass Index (BMI). BMI is based on a measurement of total mass, irrespective of the location of the mass, but BVI looks at the relationship between mass and volume distribution (i.e. where different body mass is located on the body). People of different age, gender or ethnicity will have different body shapes and recent studies have highlighted the limitations of BMI as an indicator of individual health risk.[1][2] BVI as an application for body shape and obesity measurement[edit] The Body Volume Index (BVI) was originally devised in February 2000 as a new, modern-day measurement for measuring obesity; an alternative to the Body Mass Index (BMI) which was originally conceived between 1830 and 1850. BVI is an application[3] that can be used on a 3D Full Body Scanner to determine individual health risk, whether the scanning hardware uses visible light optical information or otherwise.

Common Medical Abbreviations BBB bundle branch blockBCAA branched chain amino acidsBE barium enemaBEE basal energy expenditurebid twice a dayBKA below the knee amputationBM bone marrow or bowel movementBMR basal metabolic rateBOM bilateral otitis mediaBP blood pressureBPH benign prostatic hypertrophy BPM beats per minuteBRBPR bright red blood per rectumBRP bathroom priviledgesBS bowel or breath soundsBUN blood urea nitrogenBW body weightBX biopsy DAT diet as toleratedDAW dispense as writtenDC discontinue or dischargeD&C dilation and curettageDDx differential diagnosisD5W 5% dextrose in waterDI diabetes insipidusDIC disseminated intravascular coagulopathyDIP distal interphalangeal jointDJD degenerative joint diseaseDKA diabetic ketoacidosisdL deciliterDM diabetes mellitusDNR do not resuscitateDOA dead on arrivalDOE dyspnea on exertionDPL diagnostic peritoneal lavageDPT diphtheria, pertussis, tetanusDTR deep tendon reflexesDVT deep venous thrombosisDX diagnosis

Discover meaning of words and associated words at SnappyWords.com It’s an online interactive English dictionary and thesaurus that helps you find the meanings of words and draw connections to associated words. You can easily see the meaning of each by simply placing the mouse cursor over it. Why use Snappy Words visual dictionary? Easy to use dictionary and thesaurus. Democratic Party (United States) Since the 1930s, the party has promoted a social liberal platform.[2][11][12] Until the late 20th century the party had a powerful conservative and populist wing based in the rural South, which over time has greatly diminished. Today its Congressional caucus is composed mostly of progressives and centrists.[13] History The Democratic Party evolved from the Jeffersonian Republican or Democratic-Republican Party organized by Thomas Jefferson and James Madison in opposition to the Federalist party of Alexander Hamilton and John Adams.

The Human Heart Your browser does not support JavaScript. <a title='RSS-to-JavaScript.com: Free RSS to JavaScript Converter' href= to read the latest news</a>. From the moment it begins beating until the moment it stops, the human heart works tirelessly. In an average lifetime*, the heart beats more than two and a half billion times, without ever pausing to rest. Nursing The content available from the Johnson & Johnson health channel is for informational purposes only. The content is not intended to be a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis, or treatment. Always seek the advice of your physician or other qualified health care provider with any questions you may have regarding a medical condition.

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