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HTML - Instant search in HTML and other developer documentation

HTML - Instant search in HTML and other developer documentation
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Documentation | Spritely Spritely is a simple plugin with only two key methods, sprite() and pan() both of which simply animate the background-image css property of an element. The difference between the two is that a 'sprite' image contains two or more 'frames' of animation, whereas a 'pan' image contains a continuous image which pans left or right and then repeats. Typically, in either case, you would use a png file (with or without transparency) for this. You might wish to use a transparent gif for Internet Explorer 6, though it probably won't look as good. Your html elements must already be the correct size you want the sprite to appear, but the background image will typically be larger than the html element, and the spritely methods reposition the background image within the html element. For documentation in languages other than English, please see Unoffical Documentation. Please note: there is a problem with the current version of Mobile Safari on the iPad Quick start What's new in version 0.6? For example,

Code Snippets Flash CS4 Professional ActionScript 3.0 Language Reference The ActionScript® 3.0 Reference for the Adobe® Flash® Platform contains the ActionScript language elements, core libraries, and component packages and classes for the tools, runtimes, services and servers in the Flash Platform. Filter by product using the preset filters This reference combines the information about the ActionScript language elements and libraries for the following Adobe products and runtimes. Click on a product name below to filter this reference to show only the content for the latest version of that product and related runtimes: Filter by product using the filter controls Use the controls at the top of the page to customize your view of the reference: Use the filters to include or exclude content for specific products and runtimes.

Creating geometric patterns in Illustrator | Veerle's blog Sometimes when I create a pattern background in Illustrator I don’t end up with a Pattern Swatch. Instead, I create a Symbol of the repeating element and I create a whole background repeating this Symbol: duplicating 1, then 2, 4, 8, 16 and so on. It’s just not always that simple to create perfectly seamless patterns, especially with geometric forms. Inspiration I found this beautiful pattern on FFFFound and I thought, this is perfect for a tutorial. Creating a hexagon shape Select the Polygon Tool from the Toolbox and draw a hexagon. Give the hexagon a dark red fill and brown border of 75 pt. Rotate the hexagon Select the Rotate Tool from the Toolbox and click in the right corner of the hexagon to us as rotation point. Add a vertical line to the hexagon Make sure your Rulers are turned on: go to View > Show Rulers or hit command/control + r. Turn strokes into fills Hit command/control + a to select everything. Tweak the brown border Duplicate and rotate 180° Create a pattern symbol

Compare Comparing strings in JavaScript is quite easy, as long as you know about the equals operator and the JavaScript If Statement. This is all you need to know to find out if two strings of your choosing are equal. Below we have created a fake authentication system and use an if statement to see if the user's name will grant them access to a special message. JavaScript Code: <script type="text/javascript"> var username = "Agent006"; if(username == "Agent007") document.write("Welcome special agent 007"); else document.write("Access Denied!") Display: Access Denied! Would you like to try again? Welcome special agent 007 Be sure you realize that when you are comparing one string to another, you use two equals operators "==" instead of just one "=". In this case, the English translation of our program would be: "If username is equal to Agent007, then print out a welcome message; otherwise, access is denied." Let's try it with toLowerCase Welcome special agent

Save form values script We have all had it happen. You spend ages filling in an online form, but before you can send it, your computer crashes, or you try to send it, but your internet connection fails, or you hit the exit button by accident. In all cases, you have just lost all the work that you put into filling in the form. That is what this script is designed to prevent. It saves all the options that you chose, and all of the text you wrote, so that in the event of you losing it all, you can recover it later, just by opening the page again, or by clicking on a button. The author of the page containing the form only needs to include the script in their page, and offer a way to save and recover the values, as I will describe here. To download the script(s), see the script license, and check details like browser compatibility, use the links on the navigation panel at the top of this page. The script can save and recover the values of: datetimedatatime-localdatemonthweektimenumberrangeemailurl Demonstration

Learn to Program, by Chris Pine A Place to Start for the Future Programmer I guess this all began back in 2002. I was thinking about teaching programming, and what a great language Ruby would be for learning how to program. I mean, we were all excited about Ruby because it was powerful, elegant, and really just fun, but it seemed to me that it would also be a great way to get into programming in the first place. Unfortunately, there wasn't much Ruby documentation geared for newbies at the time. And it wasn't very good. What saved me was that I made it really easy for people to contact me, and I always tried to help people when they got stuck. A couple of years later, it was getting pretty good. :-) So good, in fact, that I was ready to pronounce it finished, and move on to something else. It took me another year, but now I think it's really good, mostly because of the hundreds of brave souls who have helped me write it. What's here on this site is the original tutorial, more or less unchanged since 2004.

How To Create 70+ Adobe Fireworks Resources - Is there a future for Fireworks? : Speckyboy - Web Design, Web Development and Graphic Design Resources Adobe Fireworks resources seem to be few and far between, what is happening? Has Fireworks ran its course? Photoshop was always the better and more powerful (definitely, harder to use), it seems to have totally taken over. I use Fireworks all the time for quick mock ups, and Photoshop for everything else. Anyway, here are the Best (maybe, the only) 70+ Adobe Fireworks Resources. Fireworks Resource Portals Adobe Fireworks CS4 Homepage DMXzone Ultraweaver.com senocular.com Phireworx FWKit Playing with Fire Fireworks Tutorials Directories Adobe Fireworks – Tutorials Fireworks Tutorials on Layers Magazine Community MX – Tutorials qrayg.com – Tutorials disdatdesigns.com – Tutorials Aentheosweb.com – Tutorials maujor.com – Tutorials Fireworks Weblog – Tutorials maagraphics.com – Tutorials TW Design – Tutorials Vector Babe – Fireworks Tutorials Voidix.com – Fireworks Tutorials Firetuts Fireworks Extensions Adobe – Fireworks Exchange Phireworx Senocular nathanpitman.com John Dunning FW Extensions Fireworks Styles RevButton

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