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Graphing the history of philosophy « Drunks&Lampposts

Graphing the history of philosophy « Drunks&Lampposts
A close up of ancient and medieval philosophy ending at Descartes and Leibniz If you are interested in this data set you might like my latest post where I use it to make book recommendations. This one came about because I was searching for a data set on horror films (don’t ask) and ended up with one describing the links between philosophers. To cut a long story very short I’ve extracted the information in the influenced by section for every philosopher on Wikipedia and used it to construct a network which I’ve then visualised using gephi It’s an easy process to repeat. It could be done for any area within Wikipedia where the information forms a network. First I’ll show why I think it’s worked as a visualisation. Each philosopher is a node in the network and the lines between them (or edges in the terminology of graph theory) represents lines of influence. It gets more interesting when we use Gephi to identify communities (or modules) within the network. It has been fairly successful. Simon

http://drunks-and-lampposts.com/2012/06/13/graphing-the-history-of-philosophy/

Related:  GaphiPhilosophyText Analyticsideas & concepts

A New Best Friend: Gephi for Large-scale Networks Though I never intended it, some posts of mine from a few years back dealing with 26 tools for large-scale graph visualization have been some of the most popular on this site. Indeed, my recommendation for Cytoscape for viewing large-scale graphs ranks within the top 5 posts all time on this site. When that analysis was done in January 2008 my company was in the midst of needing to process the large UMBEL vocabulary, which now consists of 28,000 concepts. Like anything else, need drives research and demand, and after reviewing many graphing programs, we chose Cytoscape, then provided some ongoing guidelines in its use for semantic Web purposes. We have continued to use it productively in the intervening years.

9 Mind-Bending Epiphanies That Turned My World Upside-Down Over the years I’ve learned dozens of little tricks and insights for making life more fulfilling. They’ve added up to a significant improvement in the ease and quality of my day-to-day life. But the major breakthroughs have come from a handful of insights that completely rocked my world and redefined reality forever. The world now seems to be a completely different one than the one I lived in about ten years ago, when I started looking into the mechanics of quality of life. It wasn’t the world (and its people) that changed really, it was how I thought of it. Maybe you’ve had some of the same insights.

Analysis Jean Lievens: Wikinomics Model for Value of Open Data Categories: Analysis,Architecture,Balance,Citizen-Centered,Data,Design,Graphics,ICT-IT,Knowledge,Policies-Harmonization,Processing,Strategy-Holistic Coherence Jean Lievens A visual model showing the value of open data Human cycles: History as science Sometimes, history really does seem to repeat itself. After the US Civil War, for example, a wave of urban violence fuelled by ethnic and class resentment swept across the country, peaking in about 1870. Internal strife spiked again in around 1920, when race riots, workers' strikes and a surge of anti-Communist feeling led many people to think that revolution was imminent.

Building the Future of Work and Culture: Announcing CultureCon 2012! my doodle! I’ve been a solo artist working independently for several years now, occasionally teaming up with others around events or short-term media projects. Lately though, I’ve become less interested in just doing one-off collaborations. Querying DBpedia DBpedia, as its home page tells us, "is a community effort to extract structured information from Wikipedia and to make this information available on the Web." That's "available" in the sense of available as data to programs that read and process it, because the data was already available to eyeballs on Wikipedia. This availability is a big deal to the semantic web community because it's a huge amount of valuable (and often, fun) information that the public can now query with SPARQL, the W3C standard query language that is one of the pillars of the semantic web. Although I'd dabbled in SPARQL and seen several sample SPARQL queries against DBpedia in action, I had a little trouble working out how to create my own SPARQL queries against DBpedia data. I finally managed to do it, so I thought I'd describe here how I successfully implemented my first use case.

How To Be A Philosopher Articles Ian Ravenscroft philosophizes about philosophizing. 1. What to Wear Philosophers rarely get worked up about clothing. Clothes can be a source of aesthetic pleasure, and few philosophers are adamantly opposed to pleasure. Linguistics and the Book of Mormon According to most adherents of the Latter Day Saint movement, the Book of Mormon is a 19th-century translation of a record of ancient inhabitants of the American continent, which was written in a script which the book refers to as "reformed Egyptian."[1][2][3][4][5] This claim, as well as virtually all claims to historical authenticity of the Book of Mormon, are generally rejected by non–Latter Day Saint historians and scientists.[6][7][8][9][10] Linguistically based assertions are frequently cited and discussed in the context of the subject of the Book of Mormon, both in favor of and against the book's claimed origins. Both critics and promoters of the Book of Mormon have used linguistic methods to analyze the text. Promoters have published claims of stylistic forms that Joseph Smith and his contemporaries are unlikely to have known about, as well as similarities to Egyptian and Hebrew.

Official Podcast of New York City Skeptics - Current Episodes - RS21 - Joshua Knobe on Experimental Philosophy Release date: November 7, 2010 Our guest, Joshua Knobe, is a philosopher interested in cognitive science, so interested, in fact, that he has contributed to establishing a whole new branch of inquiry known as experimental philosophy — and he plausibly claims that the name is not actually an oxymoron! The idea is summarized in this way on one of the major web sites devoted to the enterprise: "Experimental philosophy, called x-phi for short, is a new philosophical movement that supplements the traditional tools of analytic philosophy with the scientific methods of cognitive science. So experimental philosophers actually go out and run systematic experiments aimed at understanding how people ordinarily think about the issues at the foundation of the philosophical discussion.” Joshua Knobe is an assistant professor at Yale University, affiliated both with the Program in Cognitive Science and the Department of Philosophy. Comment on the episode teaser.

Adam Feuer » Blog Archive » Culture Hacking Some culture hackers work on methods that can be shared between teams; others work on the culture for specific companies. Some, like the Core Protocols, are applicable to both. Culture Hacking as a field or discipline is at a level above individual systems. Culture hacking at its best is about creating cultures that enable people and teams to achieve greatness. Culture hackers combine and edit cultural systems, practices, values, and viewpoints, try them to to see if they work and share them with others. They do so systematically, rationally, and in the spirit of play.

About DBpedia is a crowd-sourced community effort to extract structured information from Wikipedia and make this information available on the Web. DBpedia allows you to ask sophisticated queries against Wikipedia, and to link the different data sets on the Web to Wikipedia data. We hope that this work will make it easier for the huge amount of information in Wikipedia to be used in some new interesting ways. Furthermore, it might inspire new mechanisms for navigating, linking, and improving the encyclopedia itself. Upcoming Events

Related:  Philosophyfocus