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Tabulator: Generic data browser

Tabulator: Generic data browser
The Tabulator project is a generic data browser and editor. Using outline and table modes, it provides a way to browse RDF data on the web. RDF is the standard for inter-application data exchange. You can use it in two ways As a Firefox Add-on The tabulator extension is a Firefox extension which allows Firefox to handle data as well as documents. As a web application The tabulator online version is a set of open source Javascript scripts ("AJAX") which can run in any web page to add data browsing. The Tabulator is open source under the W3C software license. Try it: About it: Publications: Berners-Lee, T., Hollenbach, J., Lu, K., Presbrey, J., Pru d'ommeaux, E. and schraefel, m. c. , Tabulator Redux: Writing Into the Semantic Web, unpublished, 2007. For Developers: Thanks to all those who have provided feedback, code patches etc. Data links Only if you have a data browser, such as ffox+Tabulator extension, installed. Tabulator project

Social Hacking LinkedData - ESW Wiki LinkedData is to spreadsheets and databases what the Web of hypertext documents is to word processor files. Use URIs as names for things Use HTTP URIs so that people can look up those names. When someone looks up a URI, provide useful information. Include links to other URIs. so that they can discover more things groupage cargo service. Linked Data Presentations: Writings: Workshop Series about Linked Data at the WWW conferences Other Workshops about Linked Data 1st International Workshop on Consuming Linked Data (COLD 2010) at ISWC 2010 Community: Examples of Linked Data: See DataSets Client side tools: Server side tools: dbview.py by DanConnolly, Rob Crowell and TimBL Virtuoso - "Sponger" component of Virtuoso's SPARQL Engine, RDF Views of SQL, and the HTTP engine's Linked Data Deployment features D2R Server P2R - expose Prolog knowledge base as linked data (when bundled with UriSpace) SPARQL2XQuery - Bridging the Gab between the XML and the Semantic Web Worlds. Live Demos: Meetups:

The Tabulator (1) Tim Berners-Lee Tim coded up the original version at odd times in November and December 2005. See Links on the Semantic Web from Dec 2005 Undergraduate Research Opportunity Program (UROP) over June-August 2006 people are below. A new team will work over the summer. Yushin Chen "Joyce" wrote the calendar views, and incorporated the Simle timeline. Lydia Chilton Lydia is working on statistical analysis, charts, etc. Ruth Dhanaraj Ruth worked on the Tabulator in January 2006, adding the asynchronous fetching of documents during queries, etc. Adam Lerer Adam works on the back-end -- the query system, and generic stuff around the query UI. Jim Hollenbach Jim is responsible for the map view. David Sheets David wrote the RDF parser, and does a lot of architecture and release engineering. Thanks also to Dan Connolly and Ralph Swick for co-supervising students and for ideas, support, testing and encouragement. When you use these techniques on the server, the tabulator works better.

C Opens Data on the Web with SPARQL Powerful Technology for Querying Distributed and Diverse Data Contact Americas, Australia -- Ian Jacobs, <ij@w3.org>, +1.718.260.9447 or +1.617.253.2613 Contact Europe, Africa and the Middle East -- Marie-Claire Forgue, <mcf@w3.org>, +33.492.38.75.94 Contact Asia -- Yasuyuki Hirakawa <chibao@w3.org>, +81.466.49.1170 -- 15 January 2008 -- W3C announced today the publication of SPARQL, the key standard for opening up data on the Semantic Web. "Trying to use the Semantic Web without SPARQL is like trying to use a relational database without SQL," explained Tim Berners-Lee, W3C Director. There are already 14 known implementations of SPARQL, many of which are open source. SPARQL Overcomes Traditional Query Language Limitations of Local Searches, Single Formats Many successful query languages exist, including standards such as SQL and XQuery. The goal of the Semantic Web is to enable people to share, merge, and reuse data globally. SPARQL Turns Data Access into a Web Service

What people find hard about Linked Data | I Really Don’t Know This post originally appeared on Talis Consulting Blog. Following on from the post I put up last talking about Linked Data training, I got asked what people find hard when learning about Linked Data for the first time. Delivering our training has given us a unique insight into that, across different roles, backgrounds and organisations — in several countries. We’ve taught hundreds of people in all. It’s definitely true that people find Linked Data hard, but the learning curve is not really steep compared with other technologies. I’ve broken those down into conceptual difficulties, the way we think, and practical problems. The main steps we find people have to climb (in no particular order) are Graph Thinking, URI/URL distinction, Open World Assumption, HTTP 303s, and Syntax… Conceptual Graph Thinking The biggest conceptual problem learners seem to have is with what we call graph thinking. Take the idea of a simple social network — friend-to-friend connections. What can we do? Practical Syntax

Semantic Web roadmap Up to Design Issues A road map for the future, an architectural plan untested by anything except thought experiments. This was written as part of a requested road map for future Web design, from a level of 20,000ft. It was spun off from an Architectural overview for an area which required more elaboration than that overview could afford. Necessarily, from 20,000 feet, large things seem to get a small mention. It is architecture, then, in the sense of how things hopefully will fit together. This document is a plan for achieving a set of connected applications for data on the Web in such a way as to form a consistent logical web of data (semantic web). Introduction The Web was designed as an information space, with the goal that it should be useful not only for human-human communication, but also that machines would be able to participate and help. It follows the note on the architecture of the Web, which defines existing design decisions and principles for what has been accomplished to date.

Notation3 (N3) A readable RDF syntax Up to Design Issues An RDF language for the Semantic Web This article gives an operational semantics for Notation3 (N3) and some RDF properties for expressing logic. These properties, together with N3's extensions of RDF to include variables and nested graphs, allow N3 to be used to express rules in a web environment. This is an informal semantics in that should be understandable by a human being but is not a machine readable formal semantics. These properties are not part of the N3 language, but are properties which allow N3 to be used to express rules, and rules which talk about the provenance of information, contents of documents on the web, and so on. The log: namespace has functions, which have built-in meaning for CWM and other software. See also: The prefix log: is used below as shorthand for the namespace < Motivation The motivation of the logic was to be useful as a tool in in open web environment. Formal syntax Semantics Note. Simplifications means

Build Your Own NYT Linked Data Application Now that we’ve published nearly 10,000 of our tags as Linked Open Data, you’re probably wondering what kind of cool applications you can build with this data. To help you get started (and since linked data applications are a little different from your average Web application), we thought we’d provide a sample application and detailed information about how we built it. Our sample application, “Who Went Where,” lets you explore recent Times coverage of the alumni of a specified college or university. The Who Went Where application (click for larger image) You can find the application here and beautified source code here. Before we dive into the source, let’s take a high-level look at the application’s control (which is fairly straightforward). Wait! Linked Data: The idea behind linked data is super simple. DBpedia: Have you ever noticed those handy little info boxes on certain Wikipedia articles? Step-by-Step to Your Own NYT Linked Data Application Step 1: Initializing the Auto-Complete Field

The Semantic Web: An Introduction This document is designed as being a simple but comprehensive introductory publication for anybody trying to get into the Semantic Web: from beginners through to long time hackers. Recommended pre-reading: the Semantic Web in Breadth. Table Of Contents What Is The Semantic Web? The Semantic Web is a mesh of information linked up in such a way as to be easily processable by machines, on a global scale. The Semantic Web was thought up by Tim Berners-Lee, inventor of the WWW, URIs, HTTP, and HTML. What's the rationale for such a system? So the Semantic Web can be seen as a huge engineering solution... but it is more than that. The Semantic Web is generally built on syntaxes which use URIs to represent data, usually in triples based structures: i.e. many triples of URI data that can be held in databases, or interchanged on the world Wide Web using a set of particular syntaxes developed especially for the task. URI - Uniform Resource Identifier RDF - Resource Description Framework Why RDF? Logic

Semantic Studios | Information Architecture, User Experience, Fi What is the Semantic Web? Introduction Many people are not clear as to what the Semantic web is, and as we are the Semantic Web Agreement Group, we need to define it for people. Therefore, here is an attempt at a clear view of the Semantic Web:- The Semantic Web is a Web that includes documents, or portions of documents, describing explicit relationships between things and containing semantic information intended for automated processing by our machines. It operates on the principle of shared data. Clear Intent Although the SW is a Web of data, it is intended primarily for humans; it would use machine processing and databases to take away some of the burdens we currently face so that we can concentrate on the more important things that we can use the Web for. Practical solutions include the use of XSLT to derive RDF from XML sources, the work on topic maps and RDF convergence, the emergence of general-purpose RDF databases and engines, and general and specific GUIs for RDF data. - XML.com An Example Data:- Filter:-

Web&#039;s second phase puts users in control | E-learning | Edu Many believe the web has entered a second phase, where new services and software - collectively known as web 2.0 - are transforming the web from a predominantly "read only" medium to one where anyone can publish and share content and easily collaborate with others. The "new" web is already having an impact in class, as teachers start exploring the potential of blogs, media-sharing services, and other social software, which, although not designed specifically for e-learning, can be used to empower students and create exciting new learning opportunities. These same tools allow teachers to share and discuss innovations more easily and, in turn, spread good practice. A travel weblog "Snails are not that bad, they taste like garlic mushrooms when you get them out of the shell," writes Scott on Musselburgh grammar school's Paris-Normandy 2006 web log. Discussing/annotating images Students discuss a Robert Campin painting using Flickr at Video blogging

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