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Tabulator: Generic data browser

Tabulator: Generic data browser
The Tabulator project is a generic data browser and editor. Using outline and table modes, it provides a way to browse RDF data on the web. RDF is the standard for inter-application data exchange. You can use it in two ways As a Firefox Add-on The tabulator extension is a Firefox extension which allows Firefox to handle data as well as documents. As a web application The tabulator online version is a set of open source Javascript scripts ("AJAX") which can run in any web page to add data browsing. The Tabulator is open source under the W3C software license. Try it: About it: Publications: Berners-Lee, T., Hollenbach, J., Lu, K., Presbrey, J., Pru d'ommeaux, E. and schraefel, m. c. , Tabulator Redux: Writing Into the Semantic Web, unpublished, 2007. For Developers: Thanks to all those who have provided feedback, code patches etc. Data links Only if you have a data browser, such as ffox+Tabulator extension, installed. Tabulator project

SWSE The Tabulator (1) Tim Berners-Lee Tim coded up the original version at odd times in November and December 2005. See Links on the Semantic Web from Dec 2005 Undergraduate Research Opportunity Program (UROP) over June-August 2006 people are below. A new team will work over the summer. Yushin Chen "Joyce" wrote the calendar views, and incorporated the Simle timeline. Lydia Chilton Lydia is working on statistical analysis, charts, etc. Ruth Dhanaraj Ruth worked on the Tabulator in January 2006, adding the asynchronous fetching of documents during queries, etc. Adam Lerer Adam works on the back-end -- the query system, and generic stuff around the query UI. Jim Hollenbach Jim is responsible for the map view. David Sheets David wrote the RDF parser, and does a lot of architecture and release engineering. Thanks also to Dan Connolly and Ralph Swick for co-supervising students and for ideas, support, testing and encouragement. When you use these techniques on the server, the tabulator works better.

Tools This page gives an overview of software tools related to the Semantic Web or to semantic technologies in general. Due to the large amount of tools being created in the community, this site is always somewhat outdated. Contributions and updates are welcomed. Adding your own Adding your own tool is as easy as creating a page. Do not forget to use a suitable category to classify the tool, otherwise it will not appear below. If your tool is an OWL 2 implementation or a RIF implementation not yet listed here, please consider to add it. Current tools on semanticweb.org.edu The following tools are currently recorded in this wiki. RDF2Go (Version 4.8.3, 4 June 2013) Bigdata (Version 1.2.3, 31 May 2013) Semantic Measures Library (Version 0.0.5, 4 April 2013) HermiT (Version 1.3.7, 25 March 2013) Fluent Editor (Version 2.2.2, 20 March 2013) The following is a list of all tools currently known (use the icons in the table header to sort by any particular column)

RDF Automation Ushering in Semantic Web Researchers with the Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute (RPI) have thrown themselves head over heels into the semantic web. At this year's 8th International Semantic Web Conference, they presented a paper (download the PDF) focused on the problem of automatically generating the metadata that many semantic web functionalities rely on. Talking about RDF closures can cause eyelids to flutter, but the RPI folks aren't living in some theoretical world. A Quick RDF Primer Before I get into the tech, here's a quick primer for those who don't know their RDFs from their RFCs. Ultimately, RDF is the heart of the Semantic Web. The most important RDF concept to understand is that of the RDF Triple. Resource Description Framework (RDF) Triple — Subject, Predicate (or Property) and Object (or Value) The meaning (or semantic value) of an RDF expression is that some relationship — defined by the RDF Predicate/Property — exists between the RDF Subject and the RDF Object/Value. RDF in Action <?

Primer - Getting into the semantic web and RDF using N3 [translations into other languages ] The world of the semantic web, as based on RDF, is really simple at the base. This article shows you how to get started. Subject, verb and object In RDF, information is simply a collection of statements, each with a subject, verb and object - and nothing else. <#pat><#knows><#jo> . Everything, be it subject, verb, or object, is identified with a Uniform Resource Identifier. There is one exception: the object (only) can be a literal, such as a string or integer: <#pat><#knows><#jo> . The verb "knows" is in RDF called a "property" and thought of as a noun expressing a relation between the two. <#pat><#child><#al> . alternatively, to make it more readable, as either <#pat> has <#child><#al> . or <#al> is <#child> of <#pat> . There are two shortcuts for when you have several statements about the same subject: a semicolon ";" introduces another property of the same subject, and a comma introduces another object with the same predicate and subject. could be written

Notation3 (N3): A readable RDF syntax Up to Design Issues An RDF language for the Semantic Web This article gives an operational semantics for Notation3 (N3) and some RDF properties for expressing logic. These properties, together with N3's extensions of RDF to include variables and nested graphs, allow N3 to be used to express rules in a web environment. This is an informal semantics in that should be understandable by a human being but is not a machine readable formal semantics. This document is aimed at a logician wanting to a reference by which to compare N3 Logic with other languages, and at the engineer coding an implementation of N3 Logic and who wants to check the detailed semantics. These properties are not part of the N3 language, but are properties which allow N3 to be used to express rules, and rules which talk about the provenance of information, contents of documents on the web, and so on. The log: namespace has functions, which have built-in meaning for CWM and other software. See also: Motivation Formal syntax

Resource Description Framework (RDF) Schema Specification 1.0 W3C Candidate Recommendation 27 March 2000 This Version: Latest Version: Previous Version: Editors: Dan Brickley, University of Bristol R.V. Acknowledgments Copyright ©1998,1999,2000 W3C® (MIT, INRIA, Keio), All Rights Reserved. Abstract This specification describes how to use RDF to describe RDF vocabularies. Status of this document This document is a Candidate Recommendation of the World Wide Web Consortium. This specification is a revision of the Proposed Recommendation of March 03 1999, incorporating editorial suggestions received in review comments. The Resource Description Framework is part of the W3C Metadata Activity. This section describes the status of this document at the time of its publication. It is inappropriate to use W3C Candidate Recommendations as reference material or to cite them as other than "work in progress". Table of Contents 1. 1.1. 1.1.1. 2.

Resource Description Framework (RDF) / W3C Semantic Web Activity Overview RDF is a standard model for data interchange on the Web. RDF has features that facilitate data merging even if the underlying schemas differ, and it specifically supports the evolution of schemas over time without requiring all the data consumers to be changed. RDF extends the linking structure of the Web to use URIs to name the relationship between things as well as the two ends of the link (this is usually referred to as a “triple”). Using this simple model, it allows structured and semi-structured data to be mixed, exposed, and shared across different applications. This linking structure forms a directed, labeled graph, where the edges represent the named link between two resources, represented by the graph nodes. Recommended Reading The RDF 1.1 specification consists of a suite of W3C Recommendations and Working Group Notes, published in 2014. A number of textbooks have been published on RDF and on Semantic Web in general. Discussions on a possible next version of RDF

SPARQL Query Language for RDF W3C Recommendation 15 January 2008 New Version Available: SPARQL 1.1 (Document Status Update, 26 March 2013) The SPARQL Working Group has produced a W3C Recommendation for a new version of SPARQL which adds features to this 2008 version. This version: Latest version: Previous version: Editors: Eric Prud'hommeaux, W3C <eric@w3.org> Andy Seaborne, Hewlett-Packard Laboratories, Bristol <andy.seaborne@hp.com> Please refer to the errata for this document, which may include some normative corrections. See also translations. Copyright © 2006-2007 W3C® (MIT, ERCIM, Keio), All Rights Reserved. Abstract RDF is a directed, labeled graph data format for representing information in the Web. Status of This Document This section describes the status of this document at the time of its publication. This is a W3C Recommendation. Appendices 1 Introduction Data: Query: ? ? ? ?

Linked Data | Linked Data - Connect Distributed Data across the SweoIG/TaskForces/CommunityProjects/LinkingOpenData - ESW Wiki News 2014-12-03: The 8th edition of the Linked Data on the Web workshop will take place at WWW2015 in Florence, Italy. The paper submission deadline for the workshop is 15 March, 2015. 2014-09-10: An updated version of the LOD Cloud diagram has been published. The new version contains 570 linked datasets which are connected by 2909 linksets. New statistics about the adoption of the Linked Data best practices are found in an updated version of the State of the LOD Cloud document. 2014-04-26: The 7th edition of the Linked Data on the Web workshop took place at WWW2014 in Seoul, Korea. The workshop was attended by around 80 people. Project Description The Open Data Movement aims at making data freely available to everyone. The goal of the W3C SWEO Linking Open Data community project is to extend the Web with a data commons by publishing various open data sets as RDF on the Web and by setting RDF links between data items from different data sources. Clickable version of this diagram. Demos

RDF Book Mashup The RDF book mashup demonstrates how Web 2.0 data sources like Amazon, Google or Yahoo can be integrated into the Semantic Web. The RDF book mashup makes information about books, their authors, reviews, and online bookstores available on the Semantic Web. This information can be used by RDF tools and you can link to it from your own Semantic Web data. Contents News 2009/07/17: GoodRelations support added. 1. The vision of the Semantic Web is to build a global information space consisting of linked data. The goal of the RDF book mashup is to show how Web 2.0 data sources can be integrated into the Semantic Web, meaning that Web 2.0 data can be browsed using generic RDF browsers like Tabulator and can be crawled and cached by Semantic Web search engines like SWSE, SWOOGLE or the Semantic Web Client Library, which will eventually make it possible to query the complete Web using the SPARQL query language. The book mashup applies these principles to Web 2.0 data about books. 2. 3. 4. 5. 6.

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