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Iron Man

Iron Man
Iron Man is a fictional character, a superhero that appears in comic books published by Marvel Comics. The character was created by writer-editor Stan Lee, developed by scripter Larry Lieber, and designed by artists Don Heck and Jack Kirby. He made his first appearance in Tales of Suspense #39 (March 1963). Publication history[edit] Premiere[edit] Iron Man's Marvel Comics premiere in Tales of Suspense #39 was a collaboration among editor and story-plotter Stan Lee, scripter Larry Lieber, story-artist Don Heck, and cover-artist and character-designer Jack Kirby.[2] In 1963, Lee had been toying with the idea of a businessman superhero.[3] He wanted to create the "quintessential capitalist", a character that would go against the spirit of the times and Marvel's readership.[4] Lee said, I think I gave myself a dare. In his premiere, Iron Man was an anti-communist hero, defeating various Vietnamese agents. Themes[edit] First series[edit] Later volumes[edit]

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Iron_Man

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Dark Legacy Comics (When you are out of the country and have no Wacom Pad or Photoshop) 1. Obtain a cutout of your favorite character. The Avengers (2012 film) The Avengers premiered on April 11, 2012, at Hollywood's El Capitan Theatre and was released theatrically in the United States on May 4, 2012. The film garnered numerous critical awards and nominations, including Academy Award and BAFTA nominations for achievements in visual effects and has set or tied numerous box office records, including the biggest opening weekend in North America. The Avengers grossed over $1.5 billion worldwide, and became the third-highest-grossing film during its theatrical run—as well as the first Marvel production to generate $1 billion in ticket sales.

Spider-Man When Spider-Man first appeared in the early 1960s, teenagers in superhero comic books were usually relegated to the role of sidekick to the protagonist. The Spider-Man series broke ground by featuring Peter Parker, the high school student behind Spider-Man's secret identity and with whose "self-obsessions with rejection, inadequacy, and loneliness" young readers could relate.[4] Unlike previous teen heroes such as Bucky and Robin, Spider-Man had no superhero mentor like Captain America and Batman; he thus had to learn for himself that "with great power there must also come great responsibility"—a line included in a text box in the final panel of the first Spider-Man story but later retroactively attributed to his guardian, the late Uncle Ben. Publication history

Ms. Marvel Carol Danvers[edit] Sharon Ventura[edit] Karla Sofen[edit] Kamala Khan[edit] Intro to Graphic Novels So you think you’ve got the next WATCHMEN percolating in your brain? Itching to bring your very own X-MEN to life? Or maybe there’s simply a RICHIE RICH story burning a hole in your skull. Avengers (comics) The Avengers is a team of superheroes, appearing in comic books published by Marvel Comics. The team made its debut in The Avengers #1 (Sept. 1963), created by writer-editor Stan Lee and artist/co-plotter Jack Kirby, following the trend of super-hero teams after the success of DC Comics' Justice League of America.[1] The team debuted in The Avengers #1 (Sept. 1963), using characters created primarily by writer-editor Stan Lee with penciller and co-plotter Jack Kirby. This initial series, published bi-monthly through issue #6 (July 1964) and monthly thereafter ran through issue #402 (Sept. 1996), with spinoffs including several annuals, miniseries and a giant-size quarterly sister series that ran briefly in the mid-1970s.[3] Marvel filed for a trademark for "The Avengers" in 1967 and the United States Patent and Trademark Office issued the registration in 1970.[4]

Hulk The Hulk first appeared in The Incredible Hulk #1 (cover dated May 1962), written by writer-editor Stan Lee, penciled and co-plotted by Jack Kirby,[6] and inked by Paul Reinman. Lee cites influence from Frankenstein[7] and Dr. Jekyll and Mr. Hyde in the Hulk's creation: Doctor Doom Publication history[edit] Created by writer-editor Stan Lee and artist/co-plotter Jack Kirby, the character first appeared in The Fantastic Four #5 (July 1962) wearing his trademark metal mask and green cloak. Creation and development[edit] Like many of Marvel's Silver Age characters, Doctor Doom was conceived by writer Stan Lee and artist Jack Kirby. With the Fantastic Four title performing well, Lee and Kirby were trying to dream up a "soul-stirring…super sensational new villain.

ReTales: Dave Pifer, Owner of Secret Headquarters Wednesday, July 23, 2008, by Keri Pina Secret Headquarters owner Dave Pifer <div class="gallery-container"><div class="gallery"><a href=" src=" width="528" height="396" border="0" /></a><br /><a href=" style="font-size: 9px; text-align: center;">Click the image above to view the full photogallery.</a></div></div> Wood floors and leather arm chairs make Secret Headquarters feel more like a gentleman’s study than a comic book store.

Maria Hill Publication history[edit] Joe Quesada, who was Marvel's editor-in-chief during her first appearance, describes the character thus: "[Hill] is such a strong personality, she's like a force of nature and quite frankly, while perhaps not immediately loved by all involved, she's certainly as strong and imposing a figure as Nick Fury. Right now I feel that people view her as the outsider but [while] I don't think she's any harsher than Fury has ever been, what's different is that we aren't quite clear about her motives".[dead link][2] Maria Hill appeared as a supporting character in the 2010–2013 Avengers series, from issue #1 (July 2010) through its final issue, #34 (January 2013), but only appeared sporadically after the first half of its run.

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