background preloader

How to Build New Habits with Mind Maps and Mindmapping

How to Build New Habits with Mind Maps and Mindmapping
Recently I had the opportunity to read a fantastic book on habits and how they really work backed with some scientific research. What really stood out how the author was able to break down habits into different components that would make it much easier to adapt new habits and change old ones. With help of mind maps building new habits has become even easier. Here’s how. Quick Summary Each habit consists of a cue, routine and a reward.Mind maps support you in planning your habit and effectively overseeing it.Each mind map will have a branch for each habit component.Specify your plan of action and details in your mind map. Habits 101: The Habit Loop In the book The Power of Habit, author Charles Duhigg writes how each habit can be broken down into different parts and I’m going to borrow his framework for this post. CueRoutineReward This is the habit loop. The habit loop. Each habit is started by a cue or another way of phrasing that is that a trigger is what will initiate a habit. Cue Routine Related:  Mind VisualMindmappingHabits

5 Examples of Asian Efficiency Mind Maps (And See How We Mind Map) We frequently get asked for mind mapping tips and how we implement mind maps. We have decided to share a couple examples of mind maps we have used for the blog so everyone can have a glimpse of how we do it. Below are five examples of mind maps that we have created so you can get an idea on how we do it. We have a very specific way of blogging – it starts with brain storming and we use mind maps to help us in this process. The mind maps discussed in the post are created by both Aaron and I. All mind maps are available in a zip file that you can download here. So with that all out of the way, let’s get to the actual mind maps. 1. One good use of mind mapping is for brainstorming. As an example, here is a brainstorm mind map of mine when I wrote about Eat That Frog by Brian Tracy. When you really know your topic then your mind map will be fairly complete when you first create it. 2. Mind maps can great great for compiling lists just like text notes. Pretty straight forward, right? 3. 4. 5.

Mind Mapping Benefits Clive Lewis, the author of this briefing, has used Mind Maps for over 25 years and has trained thousands of people in how to gain dramatic benefits from this uniquely versatile technique. Businesses and other organisations have many needs that can be satisfied by properly constructed Mind Maps. The key is to ensure that Mind Maps are used effectively. To paraphrase the age-old truth: "No-one needs Mind Maps; they need what Mind Maps can do for them!" In order to be successful in the long term, people and the organisations they work for need to constantly develop their effectiveness and their efficiency. Read some real Mind Map user stories As someone who has used Mind Maps throughout my adult life, I am sometimes guilty of being a little fanatical about how they can transform people’s working and learning. Mind Map® and Mind Maps® are registered trademarks of The Buzan Organisation ^ Back to top

The Power of Habit: Why We Do What We Do in Life and Business: Charles Duhigg: 3520700000553: Amazon.com 7 Everyday Mind Mapping Uses with Examples One simple way to extend your understanding and use of mind maps, is to simply use them in different situations and contexts. Here are some simple everyday uses for mind maps (with examples). Quick Summary Think notes, think mind map. This is the best way to find potential mind map uses – think about where you normally take notes, and use a mind map instead.The common uses: summaries, brainstorming and ideation, problem solving, content creation, taking notes.The less-common uses: project management, planning, analyses and decision making, rapid thought recording.Download all the example mindmaps here. Common Everyday Mind Map Uses Let’s start with the common uses for mind maps. 1. One of the simplest and most effective uses for mind maps is to use them to create summaries for books, audiobooks or any other sort of multimedia course. Why create book summaries? As an example, here’s a stripped-down copy of one of my own book summaries for The Alchemist, a book we looked at recently. 2. 3. 4.

Using Brainwriting For Rapid Idea Generation Advertisement When a group wants to generate ideas for a new product or to solve a problem, you will usually hear the clarion call, “Let’s brainstorm!” You assemble a group, spell out the basic ground rules for brainstorming (no criticism, wild ideas are welcome, focus on quantity, combine ideas to make better ideas) and then have people yell out ideas one at a time. Brainstorming is often the method of choice for ideation, but it is fraught with problems that range from participants’ fear of evaluation to the serial nature of the process — only one idea at a time. Brainwriting is an easy alternative or a complement to face-to-face brainstorming, and it often yields more ideas in less time than traditional group brainstorming. What Is Brainwriting? When I teach my graduate course in “Prototyping and Interaction Design,” I start with a class on ways to generate ideas. Brainwriting is simple. When To Use Brainwriting Brainwriting can be used in the following situations: Brainwriting 6-3-5

The 30 second habit with a lifelong impact — Sonra Oku There are no quick fixes. I know this as a social science junkie, who’s read endless books and blogs on the subject, and tried out much of the advice — mostly to no avail. So I do not entitle this post lightly. And I write it only having become convinced, after several months of experimentation, that one of the simplest pieces of advice I’ve heard is also one of the best. It is not from a bestselling book — indeed no publisher would want it: even the most eloquent management thinker would struggle to spin a whole book around it. Nor is it born out of our world of digital excess and discontent. The man in question, an éminence grise of the business world, is one of the most interesting people I have ever met. I met him first over a coffee in his apartment, to discuss the strategy for a highly political non-profit working in Africa. So when he shared some of the best advice he’d ever received, I was captivated. If you only do one thing, do this He did, and he was.

10 Ways to Use Mind Maps Over Text Notes - Great Mindmapping Technique Here at Asian Efficiency we love mind mapping. It’s like a Swiss Army knife that can serve many functions. In fact, we prefer mind mapping in most cases, overtaking text notes. There are exceptions to this rule but in this case I will show you why you should start using mind maps over text notes for specific scenarios. Quick Summary Mind mapping has many benefits over linear text notes.The visual aspect of mind maps allows you to use mindmapping for a wide variety of things.Practical examples of when you should use mind maps over text notes. All the mind maps created are done by Mindjet MindManager – our favorite mindmapping software. 1. A great way to take notes during meetings is by using a mind map. 2. We have shared many of our book summaries here and they have all started off as mind maps. Mind maps are ideal for summarizing information, such as that found in books. 3. BudgetResourcesPeopleScopeDeadline Basic structure of a mind map for project management. 4. 5. Why? 6. 7. 8. 9. 10.

untitled 30 Challenges for 30 Days Did you know that it takes 30 days to form a new habit? The first few days are similar as to how you would imagine the birth of a new river. Full of enthusiasm it gushes forth, only to be met by strong obstacles. The path is not clear yet, and your surroundings don’t agree. Old habits urge you to stay the same. So, take a moment to reflect on the question ‘Who do I want to be in 5 years?’ Check out this short TED talk first to get inspired: Now pick one or more challenges and stick with them! However, be cautioned, picking too many challenges at the same time can easily result in a failure of all of them. #1 Write a I-Like-This-About-You note/text/email each day for someone (Easy) This is the perfect way to let someone else know you care. #2 Talk to one stranger each day (Hard) This is a great one to cure approaching anxiety. #3 Take one picture each day (Hard) This one gets harder nearing the end of the challenge because at one point you will run out of the easy shots. We recommend:

Popplet 100 Reasons to Mind Map 100 examples of how you can use mindmapping whether completely new to mind maps or a seasoned pro. I hope the list helps generate ideas for you. 100 Reasons to Mind Map 1. Want to share your Mind Maps with others? Here are the 100 reasons on one page: Exploring the art and science of conscious living. - Blog - 30 Days Will Not Change Your Life I think I can be unnecessarily hard on myself sometimes (I did just draft an article tentatively titled "I Do Dumb Things"). I get disappointed with myself when I don't follow through with habit changes as completely as I imagined I would. I've started and failed a myriad of activities, hobbies, and new habits. Just a couple of highlights from my own personal Wall of Shame include; meditating every day for over two months, going to a meditation retreat, and then not meditating for 5 months after that; still biting my nails; wasting huge swaths of time doing stupid things on my computer; eating like an idiot more than I should (donutsssssssssssss) and I'm sure many others that I'm conveniently forgetting. I started thinking about why I seem to have had trouble with certain habit changes but have done fine with others. When training for a marathon you don't strap on your shoes and go out for a 15 mile run as your first training session. And so on.

Course of Actions - Task Flow Mapping Your Day One of the things I’ve found when listing out tasks and actions, is the difficulty of organizing a list into a logical flow. Most of my day is filled with tasks that I need or want to complete in a specific order, and I wanted a simple way to map out the flow of my day. When I set out to find a way to do this, I had several criteria in mind: It had to be simple – I didn’t want a lot of options or stuff to fill in. Just a quick way to map out the actions for my day.It had to be flexible – Even though I know what tasks or actions I want to perform during the course of my day, things invariably come up. A Task Flow Map is Born I played around with several methods, and many were way too complex. The worksheet I came up with has a set of boxes, one for each task, with a small arrow indicating the flow from one box, and task, to the next. The first box has an arrow box for the current page number and the last box has one for the “continued on” page. “W” = Waiting for or @Waiting. Tony D.

WiseMapping - Visual Thinking Evolution

Related: