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Voices of the Holocaust

Voices of the Holocaust
During the 1930s and 40s, the Nazis and their collaborators murdered six million Jews. Hitler's intention was to destroy all Jewish communities, and to build a 'master race' of Aryans. Many other 'non-aryans' were persecuted including Romanies, homosexuals, and the disabled, as well as those who were politically opposed to the Nazis. This terrible moment in history is now known as the Holocaust. It remains one of the most horrific examples in recent European history of indifference, inhumanity, prejudice and genocide. Voices of the Holocaust consists of oral history testimonies gathered from Jewish men and women who came to live in Britain during or after WWII. Further interviews with Jewish survivors of the Holocaust can be found on the Sounds website. Survivor testimonies Listen to personal stories from Jewish Holocaust survivors, and learn what life was like for Jews during Hitler's reign. Information cards Discover more about the background to the Holocaust. Reference Activities ShareThis

http://www.bl.uk/learning/histcitizen/voices/holocaust.html

Related:  HOLOCAUST

The Danish Center for Holocaust and Genocide Studies Concentration camps and extermination camps belonged to two widely different camp systems: Extermination camps were only constructed with one purpose: to mass murder Jews and other “unwanted”. Concentration camps, on the other hand, had a number of purposes, among these to work as reformatory facilities, “punishment camps”, POW camps, transit camps, etc. The Holocaust Library of Congress Resources Introduction: Nuremberg Race Laws | Kristallnacht | GhettosConcentration Camps: Dachau | Bergen-Belsen | AuschwitzRighteous Among the Nations: Gies | Schindler | Winton | Grueninger Primary Source and Analysis Tools | Library of Congress Resources Primary Source Sets | PDF Version Library of Congress Resources

Holocaust Timeline Jump to: 1938 1939 1940 1941 1942 1943 1944 1945 1933 January 30, 1933 - Adolf Hitler is appointed Chancellor of Germany a nation with a Jewish population of 566,000. February 22, 1933 - 40,000 SA and SS men are sworn in as auxiliary police. February 27, 1933 - Nazis burn Reichstag building to create crisis atmosphere. February 28, 1933 - Emergency powers granted to Hitler as a result of the Reichstag fire. March 22, 1933 - Nazis open Dachau concentration camp near Munich, to be followed by Buchenwald near Weimar in central Germany, Sachsenhausen near Berlin in northern Germany, and Ravensbrück for women. March 24, 1933 - German Parliament passes Enabling Act giving Hitler dictatorial powers.

German Jews during the Holocaust, 1939–1945 1933-1939 In January 1933, some 522,000 Jews by religious definition lived in Germany. Over half of these individuals, approximately 304,000 Jews, emigrated during the first six years of the Nazi dictatorship, leaving only approximately 214,000 Jews in Germany proper (1937 borders) on the eve of World War II. In the years between 1933 and 1939, the Nazi regime had brought radical and daunting social, economic, and communal change to the German Jewish community. Six years of Nazi-sponsored legislation had marginalized and disenfranchised Germany's Jewish citizenry and had expelled Jews from the professions and from commercial life. By early 1939, only about 16 percent of Jewish breadwinners had steady employment of any kind. Thousands of Jews remained interned in concentration camps following the mass arrests in the aftermath of Kristallnacht (Night of the Broken Glass) in November 1938.

Anne Frank - Biography - Anne Frank was a teen writer who went into hiding during the Holocaust, journaling her experiences in the renowned work The Diary of Anne Frank. Synopsis Born on June 12, 1929, in Frankfurt, Germany, Anne Frank lived in Amsterdam with her family during World War II.

What was the Holocaust? - Key Stage 3 - The Holocaust Explained The Holocaust (Shoah) was a unique event in 20th century history. It evolved slowly between 1933 and 1945. It began with discrimination; then the Jews were separated from their communities and persecuted; and finally they were treated as less than human beings and murdered. During the Second World War the Nazis sought to murder the entire Jewish population of Europe and to destroy its culture. In 1941 there were about 11 million Jews living in Europe; by May 1945 the Nazis had murdered six million of them. One-and-a-half million of these were children. Jews in Pre-War Germany (January 22-23, 1934) : Table of Contents | Introductory History | Glossary of Terms ...The full truth about the persecution of the Jews is not and cannot be known. Perhaps it will never be known.

Auschwitz: Inside the Nazi State . Auschwitz 1940-1945 . The Killing Evolution Funeral of inmates who died or were killed just prior to liberation The Nazis did not start World War II with a plan to eliminate the Jews. This solution evolved—especially from 1939 to 1941—as they tried different techniques to accomplish their goals. Particularly in Germany and Poland camp commandants experimented with various killing methodologies and consulted with one another on their successes and failures. The ability of a single camp to kill 2,000-3,000 people per hour took years to achieve.

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