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The KKK and racial problems

The Ku Klux Klan was basically based in the south of America. Here they targeted those set free after the American Civil War - the African Americans. The KKK had never considered the former slaves as being free and terrorised Africa American families based in the South. America experienced great economic prosperity during the 1920's but not much of it filtered to the South. Racism mixed with anger at their economic plight formed a potent cocktail. Many different groups had emigrated to America over the years. A meeting of the KKK in 1922 The leader of the KKK in the 1920’s was a dentist called Hiram Wesley Evans whose name in the KKK was Imperial Wizard. The Black Americans tried to fight back using non-violent methods.

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Related:  Civil rights/RacismUS Civil Rights

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Founded in 1866, the Ku Klux Klan (KKK) was a secret society against color people.Today, we can refer them to the mafia because they did similar actions on ethnic groups. The same procedures were taken when the government took away the aboriginals children to put them in residential schools where they suffered many crimes. by gagnonseguinzilio Oct 31

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